Tooth Whitening Boosts Self-Esteem

May 28th, 2010
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Gleaming white teeth used to be a sign of wealth, privilege, or celebrity.  Today, tooth whitening is a common practice for people in all walks of life.  Our tooth whitening services are in high demand.

Your physical appearance says a lot about you.  You know the saying, “You only have once to make a first impression.”  Whether you are applying for a job, speaking in public, or just meeting people in general, your teeth are on display.  White teeth communicate a message that you practice good hygiene, you care about yourself, and often help you convey a healthy, vibrant and more youthful appearance.

As you age, if left untreated, your teeth will start to darken and yellow.  If you drink coffee or tea, or you smoke, your teeth can stain more quickly.  Some of the staining can be controlled through regular brushing, flossing, and dental check-ups, gut some darkening is almost inevitable.

The lack of good dental hygiene can lead to problems like cavities, bad breath, gum disease and other dental issues.  Excessive plaque often appears yellow.  All of these concerns can contribute to weakening the teeth, irritating the gums, and could lead to premature tooth loss.

If your teeth are unsightly, most people try to hide them by not smiling, not looking directly at people, not talking, or in extreme cases, not going out in public at all.  You become self-conscious and withdrawn.  Other people will be turned off, not just because of your bad-looking teeth, but your efforts to hide them make you less engaging.

White teeth can make you look more credible and confident.  Especially if your job has to do with dealing and meeting with people, such as a salesperson, consultant, marriage counselor, executive officer in your company, financial adviser, or inspirational speaker.  In those types of roles, having yellow teeth can negatively affect your image and credibility. People see someone with dark, yellowing teeth and think, ”How can I rely on this person when he or she cannot even take care of his or her own teeth?”

Sure, inner beauty is more important than outer beauty. That is true. However, this does not mean that we can neglect our physical appearance. It is also not an excuse to look shabby or practice poor hygiene. It is never all right to have that kind of attitude that as long as you are kind-hearted, it does not matter if you have the worse teeth in this world.  Like it or not, appearance matters.

Having white teeth can have an incredible effect on your confidence, and how you look and feel about yourself.  Having white teeth boosts your self-esteem.  Getting a bright white smile is not  difficult with all the different procedures available today. We offer several different tooth whitening procedures at affordable prices.  We are here to help you have a set of nice and shiny white teeth that make you feel healthy and self-confident.

How to Have a Brilliant Smile in Your Christmas Photos

Dec 20th, 2009
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

You’ve just returned home from a great holiday party, and smiling as you walk by the hallway mirror, you see it – a big green blob is stuck on your front tooth. Why didn’t anyone tell you?

To help you avoid embarrassing dental disasters during this holiday season, here are some tips to help your smile shine as brightly as the Christmas tree.

  • Alleviate some of the discoloration of “red wine mouth” by eating a bit of cheese or even drinking water between sips of wine. You should also avoid alternating between white wine with red, which is a definite stain maker.
  • Since acids in wine temporarily dissolve a microlayer of tooth, wine drinkers should avoid brushing their teeth immediately after drinking. Since teeth remain in this weakened state for about 20 to 30 minutes, rinsing with water instead of brushing right away will help protect the teeth.
  • To avoid getting food stuck in teeth at holiday gatherings, avoid broccoli, spinach, and other “stringy” foods that often lodge themselves between teeth. Sugary sweets are an obvious no-no, but if you must indulge, chocolate is a better option than caramels or lollipops. You may want to carry toothpicks or dental floss in your pocket to use when you visit the restroom.
  • Try to avoid chewing hard nuts, hard candy, and unpopped kernels because they make your teeth particularly vulnerable to cracking since they tend to weaken enamel
  • Need a cold beverage? Don’t forget that many people habitually chew on ice, which can cause gum injuries and, most frequently, cracked or broken teeth. In addition, never open containers with your teeth because that can put tremendous pressure on teeth and may result in cracking or even breaking teeth, preventing you from having a brilliant smile.

Should You be Worried About Discolored Baby Teeth?

Dec 14th, 2009
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Baby teeth, which are also called primary teeth, are typically off-white or ivory. As a young child’s teeth start to come in, many parents are alarmed to realize that their child’s teeth are not white. Discolored baby teeth can be caused by many reasons, including:

  • Inadequate brushing. If baby teeth aren’t brushed properly, plaque may form on the teeth — which can lead to tooth discoloration.
  • Medication use. Infant medications containing iron, such as supplemental vitamins, may cause dark stains on baby teeth. Taking the antibiotic tetracycline during pregnancy can cause discolored baby teeth, too.
  • Tooth or gum injury. Trauma to baby teeth or gums may give baby teeth a pink or gray hue.
  • Weak enamel. A genetic problem with enamel formation may lead to discolored baby teeth.
  • Excessive fluoride. Excessive fluoride, or fluorosis, may cause bright white spots or streaks on the teeth.
  • Newborn jaundice. A baby who develops jaundice after birth may have baby teeth with a green tint.
  • Serious illness. A widespread infection during infancy may result in discolored baby teeth. Conditions such as newborn hepatitis and some types of heart disease can have the same effect.

If the discoloration is caused by inadequate brushing, more thorough brushing is likely to help. Use water and a small, soft-bristled toothbrush or the fingertip variety designed for infants. A child does not need to use toothpaste until he or she learns to spit, usually about age 2 or 3.

If your child drinks from a bottle, remember that sipping milk or juice throughout the day or while falling asleep may lead to tooth decay. Don’t let your child carry a bottle during the day, and don’t put your baby to bed with a bottle, unless it contains a small amount of plain water.

In other cases, treatment options may include bleaching the discolored teeth or simply watching the teeth for signs of other problems. Discuss your concerns about your son’s baby teeth with his doctor. He or she may offer a referral to a pediatric dentist.