Fighting Cavities With Candy

Jul 18th, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Yes, you read it right! A new confection exists that combats tooth decay. Thanks to the research and development of oral biologist Dr. Israel Kleinberg of New York’s Stony Brook University, there is an inexpensive dental product exclusively licensed to Ortek Therapeutics Inc., called BASICMints®, that keep pearly whites cavity-free for adults and children.

This innovative “dental candy” is made with Cavistat, an all-natural product that imitates the positive effects of saliva. Cavistat contains arginine, an amino acid that neutralizes sugar-generated acid by metabolizing bacteria. It is a well-known fact among family dental professionals that saliva plays an essential role in fighting cavities by balancing the pH levels in the mouth. By combining an amino acid with the calcium in Cavistat, a protective layer forms to the teeth preventing enamel destruction.

Unfortunately, candy, processed foods, and sodas are widely consumed in today’s society. These products are normally saturated in tooth-decaying, cavity-causing sugars. However, based on Dr. Kleinberg’s research, children who ate two of the BASICMints® twice a day, during a two-year period, had 68% fewer molar cavities than the children who did not. “The number of cavities, we think, ultimately is going to get to almost zero,” Dr. Kleinberg predicted. The soft mints dissolve into the biting surfaces of the back teeth when chewed. As providers of family dental services, we’ve noted the back teeth are where 90% of cavities occur.

So, in a gist, BASICMints®:
● Nourishes healthy biofilms
● Sustains the structure to dental enamel
● Supports an ideal pH environment
● Supplies essential saliva-based nutrients for people who experience chronic dry mouth
● Adds support to daily dental hygiene

Although BASICMints® will have both parents and children smiling ear-to-ear, it should never be relied upon as the only source of preventative dental care. It is highly recommended that adults and children continue good oral hygiene (brushing, flossing, and rinsing) to prevent cavities, along with regular check-ups by your local dentist. And if you’re in the Columbus area, contact us for affordable, quality family dental services.

Be sure to stay tuned for more innovative news and information shared by The Dental Center at Easton Town Center as it pertains to improving your dental and oral hygiene habits and practices.

New Massaging Method Could Quadruple Protection Against Tooth Decay

May 4th, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

The well-known daily drill of brushing and flossing twice a day is fine and dandy, as your dentist will tell you, but massaging your chompers after lunch adds to the protection against tooth decay. In fact, the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) researchers have found that by massaging high-fluoride toothpaste on your teeth in between your morning and bedtime brushing routine, you can increase protection against tooth decay by approximately 400 percent.

This is terrific news, seeing that dentists have been noticing a significant rise of cavities and tooth decay among young children. We, at The Dental Center at Easton Town Center, recommend the massaging regimen to all our patients. Rubbing toothpaste on your teeth allows fluoride to remain on the surface longer than just brushing. It is almost like brushing your teeth for a third time. However, it should never be a replacement for daily brushing and flossing. Your local dentist will remind you this routine is still needed for adequate plaque removal.

Below are three easy steps to the dental massaging technique that provide your teeth and gums added protection.

1. Massage high-fluoride toothpaste on the surface of your teeth and gums after lunch or in the afternoon.
2. Let sit for 30 minutes or so.
3. Rinse with water and voila!

Check with a family dentist in your area before implementing the dental massaging method on children. Children have different requirements when it comes to fluoride and too much can cause dental problems, such as developing fluorosis (a disturbance of dental enamel from overexposure to fluoride).

However, for adults, especially those who are dealing with dental issues or poor oral hygiene, the massage method is definitely something to consider. In addition to brushing and flossing twice a day, and seeing your dentist every six months, massaging your chompers will help keep them cavity-free and you’ll avoid dental emergencies down the road.

Ways to Promote Good Dental Health: Sink Your Teeth Into This—Licorice

Apr 26th, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

We’ve spent many years in the Columbus area providing comprehensive and emergency dental services to our clients. And one question we always hear from our patients is, “What are other ways, besides brushing and flossing that I can improve my dental health?”

Often when one thinks of licorice, the vision of red or black chewy rope candy comes to mind. Licorice candy certainly is not something dentists or doctors encourage their patients to indulge in, but dried licorice root is! Licorice root is a natural herb that promotes good dental health and comes in many forms, such as sticks, loose tea, powder, and liquid extract. Its sweet menthol flavor makes it a tasty supplement to the basic daily ritual of brushing, flossing and rinsing.

The benefits of using licorice root are numerous.

• Freshens breath
• Remedies sore throats
• Prevents oral infections
• Inhibits the growth of plaque and tartar
• Soothes digestive issues
• Decreases inflammation
• Enhances the immune system

This is a great thing to know, especially since the World Health Organization reports that “tooth decay affects more than one-fourth of U.S. children aged 2-5 years and half of those aged 12-15 years.” Those are high percentages, as is this startling statistic: “one-fourth of U.S. adults aged 65 or older have lost all of their teeth.”

If you are thinking about adding licorice root to your daily dental regimen, talk with your doctor or local dentist first. As with any herbal supplement, there are slight risks for adverse reactions with medications and complications in certain medical conditions, such as high blood pressure and pregnancy. Most often than not, though, licorice root can be used safely in moderation.

Certainly, licorice root seems to be a wonderful supplement that promotes good dental health and hygiene, but it should never be a replacement for brushing, flossing, and regular dental checkups. It is definitely something to sink your teeth into! Teeth and gums are two personal assets worth tending to and improving for a lifetime of eating and smiles!

Live in Central Ohio? Schedule your appointment today with The Dental Center at Easton Town Center!

Preventing Gingivitis

May 18th, 2010
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

The most common form of dental disease we see in our New Albany Ohio dentist office is gingivitis.  Gingivitis is a Periodontal (gum) disease that results in inflammation or infection of the gums.  If left untreated, gingivitis can begin to destroy the tissue that supports the teeth, the periodontal ligaments and even the tooth sockets.

Most gingivitis is caused by plaque deposits on the teeth.  Plaque is materials such as bacteria, mucus and food debris which collects together to form a sticky coating on the exposed portions of the teeth.  If it is not removed, it can mineralize and harden into tartar that becomes tightly adhered to the tooth.  The bacteria and other substances then begin to irritate the surrounding gums.

The symptoms of gingivitis are somewhat non-specific.  The gums may become swollen, or bright red, or sometimes even purplish. If the gums are tender or painful to the touch, it may be a sign that gingivitis is present.  One of the most common telltale signs is bleeding gums when brushing or especially when flossing.

If you already have gingivitis, the good news is that there are many treatments available.  The first goal has to be to reduce any inflammation and prevent infection. The teeth must be cleaned thoroughly by the dentist or dental hygienist. This may involve the use of various instruments or devices to loosen and remove deposits from the teeth. A dental hygienist or dentist will also look for signs of periodontitis using X-rays or periodontal probing instruments, as well as other methods.

If the gingivitis is not responsive to treatment, referral to a periodontist (a specialist in diseases of the gingiva and bone around teeth and dental implants) for further treatment may be necessary.

Good consistent oral hygiene is the best prevention against gingivitis.  Brushing your teeth at least twice daily and flossing regularly will go a long way toward prevention.  For people who are prone to gingivitis, brushing and flossing may be recommended after every meal and at bedtime.  Plus, there are many antiseptic mouthwashes available that help to kill the germs and bacteria that form the plaque.  Special toothpastes or even prescription medications can be used if an individual is particularly prone to infections. Consult your New Albany Ohio dentist or  dental hygienist for specific instructions on proper brushing and flossing techniques to prevent or alleviate gingivitis.

Increasing your intake of calcium has also been shown to reduce the occurrence of gingivitis and other periodontal diseases.  The recommended daily dietary allowance is 1,000 milligrams, and most adults have less than half of that each day. 

Professional teeth cleaning in addition to brushing and flossing may be recommended twice per year or more frequently for severe cases. Antibacterial mouth rinses or other aids may be recommended in addition to frequent brushing and flossing.

Periodontal Disease is a dental disorder that results from progression of gingivitis, involving inflammation and infection of the ligaments and bones that support the teeth. This gradually causes the destruction of tooth support and if left untreated will lead to tooth loss.  Studies have also shown that poor dental health can lead to infections in the bloodstream, which can lead to heart issues and even cardiac events.

If your gums are bleeding, call and make an appointment with our New Albany Ohio dental office.  Your health is too important to ignore.

Should You be Worried About Discolored Baby Teeth?

Dec 14th, 2009
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Baby teeth, which are also called primary teeth, are typically off-white or ivory. As a young child’s teeth start to come in, many parents are alarmed to realize that their child’s teeth are not white. Discolored baby teeth can be caused by many reasons, including:

  • Inadequate brushing. If baby teeth aren’t brushed properly, plaque may form on the teeth — which can lead to tooth discoloration.
  • Medication use. Infant medications containing iron, such as supplemental vitamins, may cause dark stains on baby teeth. Taking the antibiotic tetracycline during pregnancy can cause discolored baby teeth, too.
  • Tooth or gum injury. Trauma to baby teeth or gums may give baby teeth a pink or gray hue.
  • Weak enamel. A genetic problem with enamel formation may lead to discolored baby teeth.
  • Excessive fluoride. Excessive fluoride, or fluorosis, may cause bright white spots or streaks on the teeth.
  • Newborn jaundice. A baby who develops jaundice after birth may have baby teeth with a green tint.
  • Serious illness. A widespread infection during infancy may result in discolored baby teeth. Conditions such as newborn hepatitis and some types of heart disease can have the same effect.

If the discoloration is caused by inadequate brushing, more thorough brushing is likely to help. Use water and a small, soft-bristled toothbrush or the fingertip variety designed for infants. A child does not need to use toothpaste until he or she learns to spit, usually about age 2 or 3.

If your child drinks from a bottle, remember that sipping milk or juice throughout the day or while falling asleep may lead to tooth decay. Don’t let your child carry a bottle during the day, and don’t put your baby to bed with a bottle, unless it contains a small amount of plain water.

In other cases, treatment options may include bleaching the discolored teeth or simply watching the teeth for signs of other problems. Discuss your concerns about your son’s baby teeth with his doctor. He or she may offer a referral to a pediatric dentist.