Is Dental Anxiety For Real?

Jun 16th, 2019
Easton Dentists Jul 5th, 2019

Believe it or not, there is an actual syndrome that is called Dental Anxiety.  Numerous studies have been performed on the topic.  One such study resulted in the following questionnaire, developed by J.H. Clarke and S. Rustvold, Oregon Health Sciences University School of Dentistry, 1993, and revised in 1998.  This scale helps dentists, especially emergency dentists, determine how to treat certain patients.

If you are anxious about visiting the dentist, please print out this form and rank your concerns or anxiety over the dental procedures listed below. Please fill in any additional concerns and bring to your appointment or your visit to your emergency dentist in Gahanna, Ohio.

Level of Concern or Anxiety

1. Sound or vibration of the drill:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

2. Not being numb enough:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

3. Dislike the numb feeling:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

4. Injection (“Novocain”):  Low Moderate High Don’t know

5. Probing to assess gum disease:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

6. The sound or feel of scraping  during teeth cleaning: Low Moderate High Don’t know

7. Gagging, for example during impressions  of the mouth: Low Moderate High Don’t know

8. X-rays:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

9. Rubber dam:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

10. Jaw gets tired: Low Moderate High Don’t know

11. Cold air hurts teeth: Low Moderate High Don’t know

12. Not enough information about procedures: Low Moderate High Don’t know

13. Root canal treatment:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

14. Extraction:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

15. Fear of being injured:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

16. Panic attacks:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

17. Not being able to stop the dentist: Low Moderate High Don’t know

18. Not feeling free to ask questions: Low Moderate High Don’t know

19. Not being listened to or taken seriously: Low Moderate High Don’t know

20. Being criticized, put down, or lectured to: Low Moderate High Don’t know

21. Smells in the dental office: Low Moderate High Don’t know

22. I am worried that I may need a lot of  dental treatment: Low Moderate High Don’t know

23. I am worried about the cost of the  dental treatment I may need: Low Moderate High Don’t know

24. I am worried about the number of appointments and the time that will be required for necessary appointments and treatment; time away from work, or the   need for childcare or transportation:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

25. I am embarrassed about the condition  of my mouth:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

26. I don’t like feeling confined or not in control: Low Moderate High Don’t know

Keep in mind that your emergency dentist in Columbus Ohio may or may not have time to use this tool. It is suggested that when you call for an appointment, that you notify staff at Easton Dental that you are concerned or experience dental anxiety. If you decide to take this assessment, be prepared to discuss with Dr. Gilmer to ensure the best possible care.

Teaching Your Child Proper Dental Care

Mar 1st, 2019
Easton Dentists May 18th, 2019

Teaching your child proper dental care in their younger years is an investment in their health that will pay off in their latter years. Start by setting an example; taking good care of your own teeth sends a message that oral health is something to be valued.

To help your child protect their teeth and gums, teach them to these simple habits:

  • Brushing twice a day to remove plaque-the sticky film on teeth that’s the main cause of tooth decay.
  • Flossing daily to remove plaque from between your teeth and under the gum line, before it can harden into tartar. Once tartar has formed, it can only be removed by a professional cleaning.
  • Eat a well-balanced diet that limits starchy or sugary foods, which produce plaque acids that cause tooth decay.
  • Use dental products that contain fluoride, including toothpaste.
  • Take your child to the dentist for regular checkups.

Supervising your children until they get the hang of these steps may be a good idea:

  • Use a pea-sized dab of toothpaste. Teach your child not to swallow the toothpaste.
  • Using a soft-bristled toothbrush, brush the inside surface of each tooth first, where plaque may accumulate most. Brush gently back and forth.
  • Clean the outer surfaces of each tooth. Angle the brush along the outer gumline. Gently brush back and forth.
  • Brush the chewing surface of each tooth. Gently brush back and forth.
  • Use the tip of the brush to clean behind each front tooth, both top and bottom.
  • Don’t forget to brush the tongue.

The Perfect Road Map For Your Child’s Oral Health

Sep 15th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Kid Roadmap

On July 3rd, 1806, two years into their journey to chart the uncharted west of America, pioneer explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark reached a challenge of epic proportion – the Rocky Mountains. What next, they wondered? Without a map, they were forced to do what explorers do – explore, and hope for the best. So, that got us thinking. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a handy map you could use to chart your own dental health? With that in mind, and in honor of our explorers, we at The Dental Center at Easton wanted to share with you a few mile markers you can use to stay on top of your child’s health today, next year, and for years to come!

 

6 to 24 months

When you’re a new parent, life is a whirlwind, and the dental care of your newborn may not be top of mind when you look in their mouths and see no teeth! Here are some things to keep in mind:

Schedule your regular visit: As soon as that first tooth comes in, you’ll want to give us a call at (614) 414-0111 to schedule your regular visit so we can review your next steps and the steps for your child. Also, be aware the ADA recommends fluoridated toothpaste now for all children under the age of three. Don’t wait!

Ask us about:

  • Home hygiene basics: Things like, tips and tricks on brushing and other care. There’s nothing better than having our hygienists give brushing tutorials – they’re experts!
  • Preventative dentistry: The possible need for fluoride supplements
  • Dietary strategies: Achieving a balanced diet early in life for good oral health later
  • Feeding practice awareness: Bottle, breastfeeding, and no-spill training cups
  • Non-nutritive oral habits: Thumb sucking, pacifiers
  • Making Dental Visits Normal: Even from a young age, your child should be very comfortable visiting the dentists. He or she should build that regular habit while young to keep a strong sense of normalcy.

 

2 to 12 years old

Ah, the little ones are growing up. Teeth are coming in at all sorts of crazy angles, and you’re going crazy from the rise in obligations. Here’s a quick list of what to consider during this time frame:

  • Preventative dentistry: Pit and fissure sealants can do wonders for keeping your child’s dental bills down, and their teeth in their head until they’re ready to fall out naturally. Ask us about them. They’re affordable AND useful. And, super-fast, you’ll be in and out in no time.
  • Orthodontic Consultation: Visiting an orthodontist for an early consultation is best done around your child’s seventh birthday. With today’s technology, early intervention can reduce the cost and duration of braces when your child gets older.

 

The Teen Years

The years “everything” happens! As children start to come into their own, new habits and desires begin to unfold as well. You’ll have to address every imaginable concern during these years, from piercings, to calls for whitening, braces, and the need to refer yourself away from your pediatric dentist and to a general dentist for continuing oral care. So, speak with us about:

  • Cosmetic Dentistry: What solutions are advisable now, and what things should be avoided.
  • Teen social pressures: Smoking, alcohol, intraoral/perioral piercings and the like. Believe it or not, we can help a lot with this. Does your teen have a favorite Dental Center hygienist? We might be able to arrange for that person to help when your teen comes in so they can address these concerns with an intermediary they trust. Give us a call at (614) 414-0111 to see how we can help!
  • Orthodontics: Options for minimizing appearance and health problems later in life.
  • Home hygiene tips: Brushing, flossing, choosing the right mouthwash.
  • Craniofacial injury prevention: With your children’s possible participation in sports, you’ll want to get them a mouthguard. Hands down it’ll be one of your best investments in a healthy mouth. And we make great ones here at The Dental Center!
  • Positive Reinforcement: Your teen hears lots of feedback from every direction, but it can be very helpful to hear the benefits of good oral health from a different voice then they hear everything else. We will work hard to reinforce this necessary message with you to your teen!

Staying on top of your child’s oral health isn’t as hard as you think, and if you keep this schedule handy, you’ll be ahead of most of your neighbor’s kids when it comes to a healthy mouth and body. Come to think of it … why not share it with them as well? They’ll thank you for the help.

Fighting Cavities With Candy

Jul 18th, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Yes, you read it right! A new confection exists that combats tooth decay. Thanks to the research and development of oral biologist Dr. Israel Kleinberg of New York’s Stony Brook University, there is an inexpensive dental product exclusively licensed to Ortek Therapeutics Inc., called BASICMints®, that keep pearly whites cavity-free for adults and children.

This innovative “dental candy” is made with Cavistat, an all-natural product that imitates the positive effects of saliva. Cavistat contains arginine, an amino acid that neutralizes sugar-generated acid by metabolizing bacteria. It is a well-known fact among family dental professionals that saliva plays an essential role in fighting cavities by balancing the pH levels in the mouth. By combining an amino acid with the calcium in Cavistat, a protective layer forms to the teeth preventing enamel destruction.

Unfortunately, candy, processed foods, and sodas are widely consumed in today’s society. These products are normally saturated in tooth-decaying, cavity-causing sugars. However, based on Dr. Kleinberg’s research, children who ate two of the BASICMints® twice a day, during a two-year period, had 68% fewer molar cavities than the children who did not. “The number of cavities, we think, ultimately is going to get to almost zero,” Dr. Kleinberg predicted. The soft mints dissolve into the biting surfaces of the back teeth when chewed. As providers of family dental services, we’ve noted the back teeth are where 90% of cavities occur.

So, in a gist, BASICMints®:
● Nourishes healthy biofilms
● Sustains the structure to dental enamel
● Supports an ideal pH environment
● Supplies essential saliva-based nutrients for people who experience chronic dry mouth
● Adds support to daily dental hygiene

Although BASICMints® will have both parents and children smiling ear-to-ear, it should never be relied upon as the only source of preventative dental care. It is highly recommended that adults and children continue good oral hygiene (brushing, flossing, and rinsing) to prevent cavities, along with regular check-ups by your local dentist. And if you’re in the Columbus area, contact us for affordable, quality family dental services.

Be sure to stay tuned for more innovative news and information shared by The Dental Center at Easton Town Center as it pertains to improving your dental and oral hygiene habits and practices.

Infant Dental Injuries are Common but Preventable

Jul 2nd, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Since baby teeth begin to form before birth, it should be no surprise that a child’s dental care really begins during the mother’s pregnancy. Pregnancy is a time when the mother makes important choices (or not) to eat balanced, nutritious meals and ingest the necessary amount of the essential vitamins and minerals to support a healthy pregnancy. Furthermore, pregnant women should have a thorough dental exam and have any cavities or gum disease addressed and treated, as well.

Infant teeth first appear through the gums at or around the age of six months. This is also the awkward, clumsy stage of development when infants are learning to crawl, sit, stand, or take steps. As we provide emergency dental services at Easton Dental, the most common infant dental injuries we see happen as a result of a fall or impact, resulting in a direct blow to the teeth.

In many cases, the teeth become loose or displaced, as the bones in which the teeth roots are anchored are still soft and elastic. A study conducted by researchers at the Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio suggests that within a 10-year span an estimated 45,398 children under the age of three required emergency room treatment due to accidents involving baby bottles, pacifiers and sippy cups. These are injuries that are preventable.

Below are guidelines that we suggest to promote infant oral health and prevent dental injuries:

● Do not put your infant or small child to bed with a bottle of milk, formula, juice, or other product that contains sugar. The sugar and acids in these liquids can cause tooth decay. Do not prop the bottle up in your baby’s mouth. Remove the bottle as soon as your baby has finished feeding or is asleep.
● Use lidless cups by 12 months of age to prevent dental injuries from falls and impacts, and limit the use of the pacifier after the age of six months to prevent infections.
● If your child sucks his or her fingers or thumb, help your child to stop. If the child can’t stop, contact your dentist.
● Experts recommend that dental care for children start at 12 months of age and continue with routine visits every 6 months afterwards.

For more information or to schedule an emergency dental appointment for your child or infant, contact the friendly, professional staff at The Dental Center at Easton Town Center today! We provide family dental services to patients throughout the Central Ohio area – call for directions today.

New Dental Fillings Are Nano-Terrific!

Jun 13th, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Sometimes, visiting your dentist on a regular basis and treating a cavity the traditional way just isn’t enough for some researchers.

As we now know, tooth decay affects our physical, mental and social well being. Caused by acids secreted by bacteria in our mouth, tooth decay (cavity) is almost always been treated by removing the decayed area on the tooth and refilling the area with a substance such as gold, silver amalgam, composite, or ceramic. Because of recent scientific development and research at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, we can add one more material to that list—Nanotech!

Researchers using nanotechology (the study of manipulating matter on an atomic and molecular scale) at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry have created a dental filling that can do much more than the traditional dental filling materials used in the past. The new material consists of tiny, nano-size particles of silver and calcium, along with an antibacterial primer and antibacterial adhesive.

Professor Xu, who directs the school’s Division of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, explains, “The reason we want to get the antibacterial agents also into primers and adhesives is that these are the first things that cover the internal surfaces of the tooth cavity and flow into tiny dental tubules inside the tooth.” Simply put, the nanotech filling material not only treats cavities, but it also kills the harmful bacteria that exists in the mouth, in addition to cultivating growth to the tooth structure that is often lost to bacterial decay.

What’s even better is researchers expect the nanotech dental fillings will last longer than the traditional dental filling substances that typically last five to 10 years. However, the exact lifespan of nanotech fillings has not yet be determined and patents are currently pending.

The professionals at The Dental Center at Easton Town Center are consistently following progressive advancements in the field of dentistry and oral health. They actively engage in passing on vital information, promoting the necessity for optimum dental health, to their patients and public, alike. If you’ve delayed a trip to a dentist in your area, now’s the time to make an appointment to remove that tooth decay. We’re accepting new patients now!

Hey Doc, Why is My Mouth So Dry?

Jun 1st, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

It’s pretty safe to say that dry mouth (also known as Xerostomia) has been around as long as humans have existed. However, dry mouth shouldn’t be overlooked. It can lead to severe problems including chronic bad breath, deep cavities and other dental issues that could require a trip to your local dentist.

When you are asleep, the jaw relaxes and opens. Therefore, the salivary glands can’t replace the saliva in the mouth as quickly as it evaporates. In addition, your brain knows you are not alert and that you will not be eating, therefore it produces less saliva. This leads to the tongue and palate drying out very quickly. So while you are sleeping, bacteria is breeding and wreaking havoc in every space and crevice in your mouth. This leads to bad morning breath and the layer of scum you feel on your teeth. This is why is it is very important to brush, floss, and rinse your mouth out in the mornings. Remember the following saying: Dry mouth at night: bacteria’s delight. Dry mouth at morning: halitosis! Take warning!

Dry mouth can also be caused by the effects of medication, diseases/infections, dehydration, radiation therapy, or from the surgical removal of the salivary glands. Although dry mouth is, in and of itself, a symptom, it often occurs along with other symptoms, such as:

● Frequent thirst
● Burning or tingling sensation, especially on the tongue
● Red, raw tongue
● Sores in mouth or at corners of lips
● Difficulty swallowing
● Problems with taste
● Sore throat and hoarseness
● Bad breath
● Problems with speech
● Dry nasal passages
● Dry, cracked lips
● Increase in dental problems, such as cavities and gum disease
● Difficulty wearing dentures
● Repeated yeast infections in the mouth

Only your dentist or physician can truly evaluate dry mouth thoroughly and effectively. If you feel have the symptoms referenced above, do not wait to discuss them with dentist in your local area. Dental decay can develop quickly in a dry mouth that is otherwise healthy. If you currently do not have a dentist, the professionals at The Dental Center at Easton Town Center are more than happy to assess and evaluate your situation. Contact them today to set up an appointment to review your dental needs – but if you feel it’s a dental emergency, we also have urgent dental services if your dry mouth has been going on too long!

Home Remedies for Fresh Breath

May 16th, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Even for those who regularly visit their local dentist, bad breath (halitosis) is a condition most encounter at one point in time. It is characterized by unpleasant breath odor. The cause of bad breath could be something as simple as types of food we eat, dry mouth, common cold, or upset stomach. Most often, however, it is caused by inadequate dental hygiene.
Here’s the dirt on halitosis. The odor is born from food particles and dead cells in the mouth that attract bacteria—bacteria that go to town in environments that have little to no oxygen (such as back of the tongue and gum pockets). These gangs of bacteria emit the noticeable odor consisting of sulfur compounds.

Let’s face it, bad breath certainly causes a person to be uncomfortable and embarrassed when around other people. The good news is that there are simple home remedies, along with regular visits to your local dentist, which eliminate the problem of bad breath.

Below are a few simple suggestions:
● Improve your daily dental hygiene routine by brushing at least twice a day and flossing.
● If you are a tea drinker, researchers have found that green and black tea stop the growth of bacteria responsible for bad breath.
● Use a mouthwash that contains no alcohol (dries the mouth), but does contain zinc ions and/or essential oils. Zinc has been found to neutralize sulfur compounds and essential oils (tea tree, peppermint, and lemon) help to reduce bad breath.
● Purchase a tongue scraper from the drug store. By gently scraping your tongue, you’ll remove dead cells, food particles, and bacteria. Thoroughly rinse afterward. If you cannot find a tongue scraper, use a toothbrush to clean your tongue or consult with your family dentist as a resource.
● Keep yourself hydrated by drinking plenty of water. This will keep your mouth moist and eliminate dry mouth.
● Snack on crunchy fruits and vegetables like apples, carrots, and celery. Crunchy foods help to remove bacteria, food, and plaque from teeth.
● Rub fluoride toothpaste on your teeth. Let it remain for 30 minutes, then rinse. The fluoride adheres to the enamel of your teeth longer than typical brushing, thus giving you added protection.
● Chew on the natural herbs licorice root, parsley, rosemary, or tarragon for 60 seconds.
● Avoid indulging in alcohol, coffee, fried foods, milk, spicy foods, and sugar, as they are found to worsen bad breath. And you dentist will be happy because many of these products are bad for your teeth.

In normal circumstances, bad breath can be eliminated with simple home remedies. However, before relying on home remedies to eliminate bad breath, it is very important to visit a dentist in your area at least every six months to have your teeth examined and cleaned. If you do not have a local dentist, The Dental Center at Easton Town Center would certainly welcome you as a new patient.

New Massaging Method Could Quadruple Protection Against Tooth Decay

May 4th, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

The well-known daily drill of brushing and flossing twice a day is fine and dandy, as your dentist will tell you, but massaging your chompers after lunch adds to the protection against tooth decay. In fact, the University of Gothenburg (Sweden) researchers have found that by massaging high-fluoride toothpaste on your teeth in between your morning and bedtime brushing routine, you can increase protection against tooth decay by approximately 400 percent.

This is terrific news, seeing that dentists have been noticing a significant rise of cavities and tooth decay among young children. We, at The Dental Center at Easton Town Center, recommend the massaging regimen to all our patients. Rubbing toothpaste on your teeth allows fluoride to remain on the surface longer than just brushing. It is almost like brushing your teeth for a third time. However, it should never be a replacement for daily brushing and flossing. Your local dentist will remind you this routine is still needed for adequate plaque removal.

Below are three easy steps to the dental massaging technique that provide your teeth and gums added protection.

1. Massage high-fluoride toothpaste on the surface of your teeth and gums after lunch or in the afternoon.
2. Let sit for 30 minutes or so.
3. Rinse with water and voila!

Check with a family dentist in your area before implementing the dental massaging method on children. Children have different requirements when it comes to fluoride and too much can cause dental problems, such as developing fluorosis (a disturbance of dental enamel from overexposure to fluoride).

However, for adults, especially those who are dealing with dental issues or poor oral hygiene, the massage method is definitely something to consider. In addition to brushing and flossing twice a day, and seeing your dentist every six months, massaging your chompers will help keep them cavity-free and you’ll avoid dental emergencies down the road.

Ways to Promote Good Dental Health: Sink Your Teeth Into This—Licorice

Apr 26th, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

We’ve spent many years in the Columbus area providing comprehensive and emergency dental services to our clients. And one question we always hear from our patients is, “What are other ways, besides brushing and flossing that I can improve my dental health?”

Often when one thinks of licorice, the vision of red or black chewy rope candy comes to mind. Licorice candy certainly is not something dentists or doctors encourage their patients to indulge in, but dried licorice root is! Licorice root is a natural herb that promotes good dental health and comes in many forms, such as sticks, loose tea, powder, and liquid extract. Its sweet menthol flavor makes it a tasty supplement to the basic daily ritual of brushing, flossing and rinsing.

The benefits of using licorice root are numerous.

• Freshens breath
• Remedies sore throats
• Prevents oral infections
• Inhibits the growth of plaque and tartar
• Soothes digestive issues
• Decreases inflammation
• Enhances the immune system

This is a great thing to know, especially since the World Health Organization reports that “tooth decay affects more than one-fourth of U.S. children aged 2-5 years and half of those aged 12-15 years.” Those are high percentages, as is this startling statistic: “one-fourth of U.S. adults aged 65 or older have lost all of their teeth.”

If you are thinking about adding licorice root to your daily dental regimen, talk with your doctor or local dentist first. As with any herbal supplement, there are slight risks for adverse reactions with medications and complications in certain medical conditions, such as high blood pressure and pregnancy. Most often than not, though, licorice root can be used safely in moderation.

Certainly, licorice root seems to be a wonderful supplement that promotes good dental health and hygiene, but it should never be a replacement for brushing, flossing, and regular dental checkups. It is definitely something to sink your teeth into! Teeth and gums are two personal assets worth tending to and improving for a lifetime of eating and smiles!

Live in Central Ohio? Schedule your appointment today with The Dental Center at Easton Town Center!