The Perfect Road Map For Your Child’s Oral Health

Sep 15th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Kid Roadmap

On July 3rd, 1806, two years into their journey to chart the uncharted west of America, pioneer explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark reached a challenge of epic proportion – the Rocky Mountains. What next, they wondered? Without a map, they were forced to do what explorers do – explore, and hope for the best. So, that got us thinking. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a handy map you could use to chart your own dental health? With that in mind, and in honor of our explorers, we at The Dental Center at Easton wanted to share with you a few mile markers you can use to stay on top of your child’s health today, next year, and for years to come!

 

6 to 24 months

When you’re a new parent, life is a whirlwind, and the dental care of your newborn may not be top of mind when you look in their mouths and see no teeth! Here are some things to keep in mind:

Schedule your regular visit: As soon as that first tooth comes in, you’ll want to give us a call at (614) 414-0111 to schedule your regular visit so we can review your next steps and the steps for your child. Also, be aware the ADA recommends fluoridated toothpaste now for all children under the age of three. Don’t wait!

Ask us about:

  • Home hygiene basics: Things like, tips and tricks on brushing and other care. There’s nothing better than having our hygienists give brushing tutorials – they’re experts!
  • Preventative dentistry: The possible need for fluoride supplements
  • Dietary strategies: Achieving a balanced diet early in life for good oral health later
  • Feeding practice awareness: Bottle, breastfeeding, and no-spill training cups
  • Non-nutritive oral habits: Thumb sucking, pacifiers
  • Making Dental Visits Normal: Even from a young age, your child should be very comfortable visiting the dentists. He or she should build that regular habit while young to keep a strong sense of normalcy.

 

2 to 12 years old

Ah, the little ones are growing up. Teeth are coming in at all sorts of crazy angles, and you’re going crazy from the rise in obligations. Here’s a quick list of what to consider during this time frame:

  • Preventative dentistry: Pit and fissure sealants can do wonders for keeping your child’s dental bills down, and their teeth in their head until they’re ready to fall out naturally. Ask us about them. They’re affordable AND useful. And, super-fast, you’ll be in and out in no time.
  • Orthodontic Consultation: Visiting an orthodontist for an early consultation is best done around your child’s seventh birthday. With today’s technology, early intervention can reduce the cost and duration of braces when your child gets older.

 

The Teen Years

The years “everything” happens! As children start to come into their own, new habits and desires begin to unfold as well. You’ll have to address every imaginable concern during these years, from piercings, to calls for whitening, braces, and the need to refer yourself away from your pediatric dentist and to a general dentist for continuing oral care. So, speak with us about:

  • Cosmetic Dentistry: What solutions are advisable now, and what things should be avoided.
  • Teen social pressures: Smoking, alcohol, intraoral/perioral piercings and the like. Believe it or not, we can help a lot with this. Does your teen have a favorite Dental Center hygienist? We might be able to arrange for that person to help when your teen comes in so they can address these concerns with an intermediary they trust. Give us a call at (614) 414-0111 to see how we can help!
  • Orthodontics: Options for minimizing appearance and health problems later in life.
  • Home hygiene tips: Brushing, flossing, choosing the right mouthwash.
  • Craniofacial injury prevention: With your children’s possible participation in sports, you’ll want to get them a mouthguard. Hands down it’ll be one of your best investments in a healthy mouth. And we make great ones here at The Dental Center!
  • Positive Reinforcement: Your teen hears lots of feedback from every direction, but it can be very helpful to hear the benefits of good oral health from a different voice then they hear everything else. We will work hard to reinforce this necessary message with you to your teen!

Staying on top of your child’s oral health isn’t as hard as you think, and if you keep this schedule handy, you’ll be ahead of most of your neighbor’s kids when it comes to a healthy mouth and body. Come to think of it … why not share it with them as well? They’ll thank you for the help.

5 Simple Tricks for Avoiding the Flu

Dec 12th, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

It always happens this time of year in Columbus.  Noses start running, eyes get red; people are getting the flu.  During cold and flu season, getting sick seems like an inevitability.  No matter where you go in Ohio, someone is always sniffling or coughing.  It almost seems like the only way to avoid cold and flu season is to stay locked up in your own home and wait for spring to arrive.

Luckily, though, we have a few simple steps you can take to stay healthy during flu season without completely neglecting the outside world.  One of the least thought of places where bacteria thrives is a toothbrush.  Think about it, you use one to get germs off your teeth but then what do you do to get germs off your toothbrush?  As dentists in Columbus, Ohio, here’s what we can advise you to start doing.

 

  1. For a thorough cleaning, put the head of your toothbrush in a cup of antibacterial mouthwash.  By letting your toothbrush soak overnight, you allow the antibacterial mouthwash to kill all the germs that typically live between its bristles.
  2. During the day, soak your toothbrush in a small container of hydrogen peroxide.  This agent has been used for years to help clean stubborn stains; it will do the same thing for your toothbrush.  The best part is, hydrogen peroxide is safe enough for you to use this trick every day, just make sure you change it out after every use.
  3. For a more intense clean, boil your toothbrush in water for three minutes.  This action will be a little harder on the life of your toothbrush but the extreme heat will kill most of the bacteria on your brush.
  4. If you’re looking to sanitize your toothbrush, you may already have a sanitizer in your kitchen.  Stick your toothbrush in your dishwasher for a cycle without soap.  The heat and water pressure will get your toothbrush absolutely clean.
  5. If you like gadgets, find yourself a UV toothbrush sanitizer.  These tools combine dry heat and steam with a powerful UV light to kill 99.9% of all germs on your toothbrush.  A UV toothbrush sanitizer will get your toothbrush about as clean as it can get.

During cold and flu season, it’s important to take every possible step to ensure your health, especially in Columbus.  Keeping your toothbrush clean is the smart and simple way to keep your mouth as free of germs as possible.  For more tips on good oral hygiene, follow us on Facebook!

When is it Time to Have Your Wisdom Teeth Removed?

Oct 9th, 2012
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Most of us have had our wisdom teeth removed or know someone that has but if you are unfamiliar with the process, it can be a little mysterious.  Maybe the only thing you know about wisdom teeth removal is that your friend from high school or college missed a week of classes because of it but that does little in helping decide whether or not you need your wisdom teeth removed.

Wisdom teeth removal is a medical procedure, usually performed by a dentist or surgeon, that removes anywhere from one to all four of the patient’s wisdom teeth.  If done at all, the extraction is usually performed when the patient is between the ages of 15 and 25, though it can also be done later in life.  In most cases, the younger a patient is, the quicker and more easily they heal making surgeries performed later in life more of an ordeal for the patient.

The main reasons for wisdom teeth extraction are to prevent future problems or to stop current problems.  When wisdom teeth grow in, they often do so at strange angles, which can lead to pain and infection.  By removing the teeth before they finish growing in, the surgery prevents infections down the line.  If the teeth have already broken through the gums, they can begin to push against other teeth and cause pain.  If they are causing irritation, immediate removal is often the best option.

For the actual surgery, the dentist or surgeon will first numb the area surrounding the teeth with a local anesthetic.  After that, they will make an opening in the gums above and around the tooth to make extraction easier.  The tooth is then separated from the jaw and gums.  As you can imagine, this would be a pretty painful procedure without the use of anesthetic.

After the surgery, the doctor will stitch up the area where the tooth had once been.  The patient is then sent home, usually with a prescription for painkillers.  Recovery time is typically a few days but could be longer if the patient is older or doesn’t follow the doctor’s orders.

The cost of having wisdom teeth removed varies but it would be best to talk to your dentist and insurance agency before you commit to anything.  If you still have questions about your wisdom teeth, let us know!  The Dental Center at Easton Town Center is more than happy to help.