How Apples are Good for Your Teeth

Oct 5th, 2018
Easton Dentists Oct 5th, 2018

Good for my teeth

People have been asserting that “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” since the 19 th century. While it may not necessarily be true that those who eat apples never have to see a doctor, apples certainly have great health benefits for our bodies! Did you know they can even be good for our teeth? Let’s take a look at what the research says …

It’s widely thought that chewing a crisp, fresh apple can help brush away plaque on our teeth. We’re not too sure on this one, as some studies show a higher plaque content on teeth after eating an apple. At the same time, there is evidence to suggest some polyphenols in apples can lower the ability of cavity-causing bacteria to adhere to teeth. Further, some studies have shown that the antioxidants in apples can help prevent periodontal disease.

Apples even contain a (very) small amount of fluoride. This is worth noting, as fluoride is so important in helping prevent cavities.

Lastly, the act of chewing an apple stimulates saliva production. Saliva helps wash away food debris and bacteria. Remember, though, apples contain sugar and acid so it’s best not to go overboard with them.

You can even swish with water after eating one to wash away some of the sugar left behind. As the science continues to look into how apples affect our teeth, one thing we know is true: regular dental visits, along with daily tooth brushing and flossing, is your best defense against tooth decay! Schedule an appointment today!

What Smiling Says About You and Why You Should Do More of It

Oct 23rd, 2017
Easton Dentists Oct 23rd, 2017

Smiles, Dentist Columbus, OH

You might’ve guessed that smiling can make you happier … but did you know it also helps you live longer?
It’s true!

Smiling also helps with attraction and happiness in more ways than you may have imagined. Looking for a romantic partner, or a new job this year? Then, get ready to flash those pearly whites!
More than a century ago, philosopher Charles Darwin and scientist William James suggested we might be able to adjust our mood simply by assuming the facial expressions representative of our goal. The first step to happiness is to start smiling!

Ever since Darwin and James proposed their theories, scientists have researched and discovered some interesting side effects to smiling along the way.

 

  • Smiling makes you more attractive: Research suggests we’re more attracted to people who smile than those who do not. While scientists aren’t exactly in agreement as to why this may be, there’s a perception that a smiling person makes others around them relaxed and happy. Basically, your smile is contagious … and therefore welcoming.
  • Smiles boost the immune system: It’s all about the neuropeptides, they say. Smiling (and also laughing) release these neuropeptides which help reduce stress. The result is less taxation on your immune system so you can remain healthy to combat any illness or stress that may come your way.
  • Smiling enhances your mood: Smile-science has a bit of a “chicken or the egg dilemma.” Does a smile make you happy, or do you smile because you’re happy? We can assume the latter is true, but what about the former? Recall those neuropeptides we mentioned earlier? Well, according to Psychology Today, when we smile, “feel good neurotransmitters dopamine, endorphins and serotonin are all released.” Your body relaxes, while your heart rate and blood pressure lower. This flood of feeling then places us in a better mood. Not bad for just crinkling up the corners of the mouth!

 

And, what about helping you live longer? Well, if the above three reasons aren’t enough for you, it seems, that, yes … smiling more can help you live a longer life. And the proof appears to be in the research. In 2010, a team of researchers aimed with an odd source material (The Sporting News Baseball Register), examined historical photographs of baseball players – tracking smile and life statistics throughout their lifetimes. From 1952 onward, these intrepid scientists crunched the numbers (and smiles), and discovered that, yes indeed, smiling did help these chaps live longer, healthier lives. They also remained married longer. Pretty neat, huh? You can check out a bit of the story on this fascinating study at Pacific Standard Magazine.

So, to wrap things up … we’ll leave you with this nugget of wisdom from cinema’s happiest of happy characters, Buddy, played by Will Ferrell in the feel-good Christmas film, Elf.
“I just like to smile! Smiling’s my favorite. Go forth and smile!”

Energy Drinks and Your Child’s Teeth. Should You Worry?

Nov 14th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Energy Drink

The hard clack of cleats echo about as your “little” sports hero rushes to get out of the house … soon to be late for practice. Armed with all they’ll need for a day in the sun, their equipment bag is packed and slung awkwardly over one shoulder, bursting at the seams with untold numbers of pads and dirty gear. And after making a final beeline through the kitchen to raid your refrigerator of a 64oz bottle or two of rainbow-colored sustenance, they’re off for what will no doubt be another grueling practice session. You’re proud of your kids – they’re growing up. And yet you wonder as you stare at the door that just shut behind them. Are those techni-colored drinks they’re drinking every day hurting them?

The truth, unfortunately, is yes. While they may keep your children energized and awake for the next few hours, the bad news is, they’re secretly eating away at their teeth – and fast.

Why Are Energy Drinks Such a Threat to Teeth?

The crux of the problem is the double-whammy that comes from an exceedingly high sugar content and citric acid pH that can be as low as 2.9. Now, we understand pH can be a tricky thing to understand, so to help put that number in perspective, a bit, consider this: battery acid has a pH of 0.0 (so, a lower number means a higher acid content). Stomach acid (which we can imagine as being quite acidic, at least!) has a pH that fluctuates between 1.0 and 3.0.  A lemon, in contrast, comes in at around 2.0, a grapefruit at 3.0, and tomato juice at 4.0.

The real distinction though is in knowing that with each increase in numerical value, the acid intensity increases 10-fold. So, in the example above, a lemon ends up being 10 times more acidic than a grapefruit, and 100 times more acidic than tomato juice – a sensation you can certainly taste if you bite into one!  In contrast, milk and water have a pH of 7.0, so, it’s easy to see the difference in the numbers – they’re huge.

The Science

What all this means to your child’s teeth is the real question, though, and precisely what researchers at Southern Illinois University set out to discover in 2012.  The results, which surprised even the research team, showed considerable damage to tooth enamel after only five days of steady consumption. Five days.

To determine the effect of these drinks on our teeth, the research team looked at 22 popular sports and energy drinks, and exposed artificial tooth enamel to the beverages for 15 minutes at a time, four times daily. This schedule was chosen because it mirrors the consumption habits of many users who drink these beverages every few hours – a particularly common habit among those who consume sports drinks, particularly when your kids are involved in sports.  After each 15-minute exposure, the enamel was then placed into an artificial saliva solution for two hours to mimic what would happen once consumption stopped.  After only five days on this schedule, the enamel showed a 1.5% loss with sports drinks, and a shocking 3% loss with energy drinks.

We have seen to many patients in their younger years already suffering from extensive enamel loss. One case was especially heartbreaking because the patient thought they were doing a great job simply by staying away from soda. The result: it gave that patient more perceived  freedom to consume these sport drinks at a higher rate because they were “better” than soda.

The Critics

While critics in the beverage industry suggest the time used to expose the enamel to the drinks may have been excessive, it’s widely known that snacking, as well as regular sipping of any beverage other than water, creates acidic activity in the mouth that promotes tooth decay. Of course, adults also need to be careful, and if you’re the weekend warrior type, or are pulling shifts and consuming these beverages throughout the day, the time of exposure might actually not be long enough.  The sweet spot is in the middle-ground, and that’s basically the advice we’re going to offer today.

There is no doubt that these beverages are not good for our teeth. They’re also not good for our stomach, and esophagus if one is prone to acid reflux.

The Middle Ground — It’s about being Informed

We’re not asking you to force your kids to give up their sports beverages and energy drinks. However, it is wise to know the risks, and to understand how you can help your kids combat some of their side-effects. Here are two quick tips that will help if they can’t shake the habit:

  • Have them keep water nearby so they sip on it to dilute the acid covering their teeth. This also increases saliva production to help protect tooth enamel.
  • Suggest that they don’t brush immediately after consuming such beverages.  Why? Because in the thirty minutes to an hour after consumption, tooth enamel will be slightly softer, and brushing in this window of time literally ends up spreading the acid around to other parts of the teeth. Not good.  If brushing is desired, save it for an hour or so after.

Lastly, here is the breakdown of most caustic to least caustic drinks as found by the researchers. Remember, the lower the number, the more harmful to your teeth!

Sports Drinks:

  • Filtered Ionozed Alkaline H2O – pH: 10.0
  • Water – pH: 7.o
  • Odwalla Carrot juice – pH: 6.2
  • Odwalla Vanilla Monster – pH: 5.8
  • Unflavored Pedialyte – pH: 5.4
  • Vita coco – pH: 5.2
  • Aquafina,Dasani, Smart water – pH: 4.0
  • GU2O – pH: 4.29
  • Powerade – pH: 3.89
  • Accelerade – pH: 3.86
  • Gatorade Endurance – pH:  3.22
  • Monster – pH:  2.7

Energy Drinks:

  • Red Bull – pH: 3.3
  • AMP Energy – pH: 2.7
  • Monster Energy – pH: 2.7
  • Full Throttle  – pH: 1.45
  • Rock Star – pH: 1.5

P.S. Don’t forget the mouthguard!

The Difference Between Plaque and Tartar

Jun 7th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

plaque buildup before and afterYou may have heard mention of the terms plaque and tartar when discussing dental care. You may have even heard the terms used interchangeably and because of that, you assumed that they were the same thing. The truth is that there is a difference between these terms and what they mean for your oral health. Let’s take a look.

What is Plaque?

Plaque is the sticky, colorless residue that builds up on your teeth and around the gum line. This sticky substance is constantly forming on your teeth and is made up of food particles, saliva, and sugar. When plaque builds up it will contribute to the grimy or gritty feeling you get on your teeth in between brushing. Even after brushing and flossing, plaque will begin to form on your teeth within hours.

What is Tartar?

Tartar, also known as Calculus, is simply built up plaque that has hardened over time. It is typically yellow in color and very hard and porous. When plaque has not been properly removed from the teeth, it turns into this stubborn, hard to remove substance. The only way to remove tartar is to visit your dentist and have him/her remove it for you using dental instruments. Tartar that is untreated puts you at higher risk of tooth decay and gum disease.

How Can I Prevent Plaque and Tartar?

The best way to protect your mouth, teeth, and gums is to brush twice daily and floss at least once a day. Brushing will remove plaque on the surface of the teeth; however, floss is needed to remove plaque buildup between the teeth and around the gum line. You should also visit your dentist for regular checkups and professional cleanings every six months.

If you have tooth crowding and find that even with brushing and flossing you still have a significant amount of plaque buildup between dental cleanings, you should consider visiting an orthodontist. Crooked or crowded teeth can make keeping your teeth plaque-free even more challenging. An orthodontist will be able to recommend a plan of action to straighten and fix the crowding of your teeth.

Follow these tips to prevent plaque from turning into tartar. If you’re due for a professional teeth cleaning, contact us today to schedule your appointment. Whether you have plaque or tartar, the best step you can take in preventing tooth decay and gum disease is to have your teeth cleaned and begin practicing good oral hygiene. Let Easton Dental clinic help restore your mouth to a clean, beautiful smile!

The Benefits Of Flossing

May 26th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

When you visit the dentist, there’s one dental care question you’re sure to be asked; “Are you flossing?” Many patients sheepishly admit they’re falling short while others fib and ensure their hygienist that they floss religiously. The truth is, your dental hygienist will most likely be able to tell if you are being honest about your flossing habits or not.

Many individuals are guilty of skipping out on flossing. As your oral health expert, we don’t want you to feel guilty; we want you to understand the benefits of flossing so that you will take up the habit out of your own free will. Being informed of how flossing helps your oral health is the first step in wanting to start the practice.

So what exactly are the benefits of flossing? Let’s look at the main and most obvious gains you get when you decide to floss your teeth every day.

 

  • A cleaner mouth– Brushing is great, but it will only get you so far. Toothbrushes are designed to help you physically clean the surface of your teeth but they cannot adequately reach between teeth. Flossing allows you to remove left over food debris, bacteria, and plaque buildup that your toothbrush cannot reach, leaving you with a cleaner feeling mouth.

 

  • Healthier teeth and gums– Flossing helps rid your mouth of plaque, food particles, and bacteria that can cause gum infections, cavities, and tooth decay. Removing plaque on a daily basis by practicing flossing prevents the plaque from turning into tartar. Tartar is difficult to remove and will lead to issues such as gingivitis and cavities. Flossing is one more step you can take in keeping your mouth healthy.

 

  • A whiter smile– Plaque buildup is not only detrimental to your oral health, it also affects the appearance of your teeth. When plaque builds up, it attracts stains and makes your teeth appear discolored. Whether from the food you eat or the drinks you drink, too much plaque can mean a dull, stained smile. Flossing helps remove plaque and keeps your smile looking brighter, longer.

 

  • Fresher breath– When bacteria reside in the mouth, they cause bad breath. Plaque and food particles are a breeding ground for the growth of bacteria in the mouth. Bacteria can be reduced with flossing by ridding your teeth of plaque buildup and leftover food debris. If you struggle with bad breath, flossing can help you move towards fresher breath.

Flossing might be a tedious habit to develop but once you get in the practice of flossing, you will reap the benefits. Not only will flossing keep your mouth healthy, it will also save you money in dental treatments that can be avoided by practicing good oral hygiene.

At Easton Dentists, we want you to know that we have your best interest in mind. If you have questions about flossing or would like to be shown the proper technique, ask one of our dental professionals at your next appointment. Contact us today to schedule your next visit!

Should I Get an Electronic Toothbrush or a Manual Toothbrush?

Mar 9th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

If you walk into your Columbus dentist office, you will probably see a model electronic toothbrush display somewhere during your visit.

columbus dentistMaybe you’ve been considering using an electronic toothbrush but want to know if it’s the right choice for you. Let’s look at some of the benefits of both the electronic toothbrush, as well as the manual toothbrush and then you can decide for yourself which is better.

The Manual Toothbrush

  • The manual toothbrush model has been around for decades. There really isn’t much to it besides the obvious handle and bristles. Some of the benefits of using a manual toothbrush include:
  • More control over exerted pressure- with a manual brush, you are more easily able to monitor how much pressure you are applying when brushing your teeth. Remember that brushing your teeth should not require a lot of exertion and the pressure you apply should be fairly light.
  • Brushing too hard can lead to the breakdown of tooth enamel and lead to sensitive teeth. Convenient size- manual brushes are small and easy to store. Due to their slender handle, most brushes will fit in any toothbrush case for travel. You don’t have to worry about how to store your brush, as most holders for the bathroom easily accommodate a manual brush.
  • Inexpensive- not only are manual brushes less expensive to purchase, they are also less expensive to maintain. You do not need to worry about buying a charging station or batteries with a manual brush. In fact, most dentist offices provide you with a free brush at each six month cleaning appointment!
  • Lots of styles- manual brushes come in a wide variety of colors and styles. You can choose the type of bristle and head size you want for a more customized approach to brushing.

The Electronic Toothbrush

Electronic toothbrushes starting to gain popularity in the 1990’s and have become mainstream since. With electronic brushes, the bristles rotate and perform the cleaning motion for you. Some benefits of electronic brushes include:

  • Smaller head- the head size of most electronic brushes is smaller than that of a standard manual brush. The smaller head size helps you more easily reach difficult or awkward areas of the mouth.
  • Does the work for you- like we mentioned above, the electronic toothbrush performs the majority of the movement for you. The oscillating bristles allow you to move the brush from tooth to tooth without having to perform much movement on your end.
  • Work better for some people- electronic brushes are more suited for some individuals than others. In particular, children or those who have motor issues. Children tend to do better with electronic brushes because they make brushing fun. Individuals who have a difficult time moving a brush around in their mouth due to motor issues or arthritis also do better with electronic brushes.

Now that you know the benefits of each, the choice is yours! Remember however, manual brushes work just as well as electronic brushes so long as you are brushing for the recommended amount of time (2-3 minutes) and are using proper brushing technique.

If you have more questions about the difference in brushes, just ask us! Call our Columbus dentist office (614) 414-0111 or simply ask a member of the staff next time you’re in. We are always happy to answer your questions and want you to be able to make the best decision based on your needs.

What Is Tooth Enamel?

Mar 4th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

You may have heard your dentist talk about tooth enamel but do you know what he/she was referring to? We’re going to discuss the important role that tooth enamel plays in your dental health so you can understand how to better take care of your teeth.

dental clinic columbus ohioWhat is Enamel? For starters, tooth enamel can be defined as the highly-mineralized, hard protective outer covering of the teeth. When you look at your teeth in the mirror, what you are seeing is tooth enamel.

Enamel protects the teeth from a variety of factors such as the force of mastication (chewing), and the varying temperatures of the foods and beverages we eat and drink.

Serving as an insulator to the nerves in the teeth, enamel helps us enjoy eating and drinking different foods without pain.

What happens when tooth enamel is damaged? Unfortunately, tooth enamel has no living cells which means that once it is damaged it cannot be repaired.

This is why it is so important to understand the role enamel plays in your oral health and to take steps to maintain the enamel that you do have. If you’re concerned about your dental health, contact our Ohio urgent dental care office.

Steps to Protect Your Tooth Enamel

Even though tooth enamel cannot be regrown or repaired without the use of bonding or a crown, you can take certain steps and modify your behavior in ways that will help you to keep the enamel you do have strong and functioning properly.

  • Avoid drinking high acid, sugary drinks.
  • We hate to break it to you, but we are specifically talking about soda (regular and diet) and fruit juice. Both of these beverages contain highly acidic and sugary ingredients which are the biggest culprits for eating away at healthy tooth enamel. Sports drinks and energy drinks should be avoided for the same reasons.
  • Consume citrus or other acidic foods in moderation. Although citrus foods such as oranges, lemons, and grapefruit are good for you, they still contain high levels of acid which is an enemy of enamel. If you choose to eat these foods, do so in moderation. You can also try eating these foods first and following with other less acidic foods to help cut down on the acid leftover in your mouth.
  • Chew sugarless gum after eating. Saliva helps protect your enamel by coating the teeth and moving acid and other particles of food out of the mouth and into the stomach. Chewing gum stimulates saliva production and helps this process even further.
  • Address health concerns. Remember, health problems such as acid reflux, gastrointestinal disorders, and other issues may be causing trouble for your oral health. Get these issues addressed as soon as possible to help protect your enamel from being exposed to excess acid.
  • Be careful what you chew. Once enamel is chipped or cracked, it cannot be restored. For this reason it is important that you do not chomp on hard items such as hard candy or ice.

Our dental clinic Columbus Ohio staff care of your tooth enamel care. It may not sound like a high priority but it is something that you should take seriously. It isn’t until your enamel becomes damaged that you will notice the nasty side effects, so take every precaution to protect your enamel while you can.

If you are experiencing tooth sensitivity or pain, that may be a sign that you have damaged tooth enamel that needs to be addressed by a dentist.

Contact The Dental Center at Easton Town Center today at 614-414-0111. We can set up a consultation with Dr. Gilmer to inspect your tooth enamel.

How To Properly Brush Your Teeth

Feb 29th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Brushing your teeth is part of your everyday routine (at least we hope) and probably doesn’t seem like a difficult task.

dentist columbus ohioYou might think that you know how to properly brush your teeth but have you ever been taught the appropriate technique? After all, proper brushing and flossing can help prevent bad breath, cavities, and other dental issues that can cost you money down the road.

We have outlined the steps you need to take to make sure you’re getting the most benefit from brushing your teeth:

  1. First, choose a soft bristled tooth brush that fits your mouth. The head of your brush should be small enough that you can reach all areas of your mouth easily.
  2. Set a timer for two minutes or simply watch the clock to make sure you are spending at least a full two minutes brushing your teeth.
  3. Place your tooth brush at a 45 degree angle to your gums and move the brush in a back & forth motion, using short strokes.
  4. Brush the outer surfaces of your top teeth, then the outer surfaces of your bottom teeth.
  5. Brush the inner surfaces of your top teeth, then the inner surfaces of your bottom teeth.
  6. Brush the chewing surfaces of your top teeth, then the chewing surfaces of your bottom teeth.
  7. Tilt your tooth brush vertically to brush behind your front teeth and then do the same to brush behind your bottom teeth. Brush your tongue to remove any bacteria that can cause bad breath.

Our dentist Columbus Ohio offices can help you improve your brushing techniques. Simply get in touch with us and we’ll help you make an appointment.

If you follow these steps, you should easily be able to effectively clean all of your teeth. Remember to floss your teeth at least once a day in addition to brushing. Flossing teeth helps remove hard-to-reach food particles and plaque that builds up in between your teeth and can cause tooth decay and other oral problems.

Here at The Dental Center we recommend flossing your teeth in the evening following your brushing routine and after you’re done eating for the day. In order to make sure your tooth brush is effective, replace your brush every 3-4 months or before if there are visible signs of wear such as bent bristles.

We also recommend that you replace your tooth brush following an illness like the flu or a cold, as bacteria can get on your toothbrush and possibly cause reinfection.

Finally, in order to maintain a healthy mouth and teeth, visit your dentist for a routine cleaning every 6 months. Routine cleanings are important for removing built up plaque and checking for oral issues like cavities, gum disease, and other problems that can pop up between dental visits.

To schedule your next cleaning, contact our dentist Columbus office today!

How is Professional Teeth Whitening Different Than Over the Counter Options

Oct 30th, 2015
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

If you have an upcoming event with a less than shiny white smile, you may be weighing your options for teeth whitening: at home, or at the dentist’s office? With dozens of at-home whitening options available, you may be wondering how professional teeth whitening options are different than over the counter options. We’re helping you make the big call when it comes to whitening your teeth.

At Home Whitening Options

When it comes to at-home teeth whitening, there is no limit to the options. Whitening rinses, gel strips, various toothpastes, and whitening trays are all common items that can be found at the local drug store. While all of these products will improve the appearance of your teeth, there are also several drawbacks to consider. For example, many whitening products that come in strip or tray form will only whiten 4-6 teeth in the front of the mouth and require up to 20 days of usage.

Furthermore, many find their teeth are too sensitive to use whitening gel or strips and experience intense pain following the application. Since at-home whitening solutions aren’t custom made for your teeth, you may end up irritating your gums and enamel, causing pain and discomfort.

Professional Teeth Whitening

Even with at-home treatments available, many people would prefer to leave it to the professionals. Pros of professional teeth whitening include:

– A custom procedure. Since this is a hands-on procedure, your dentist will customize your teeth whitening experience to suit your mouth, your teeth, and your sensitivities.

– A stronger solution. Whitening done in your dentist office result in more dramatic whitening.

– A whiter smile. At-home whitening serum’s can be cumbersome and difficult to apply. Teeth whitening in the office allows for a professional bleaching that is tailor made to your stains. For example, bleaching works very well for yellow teeth, but not for gray stains. Your dentist will be able to provide customized whitening solutions.

– Insurance options. Whether you choose at home or in the office, whitening can get expensive. Take advantage of your dental insurance and company plans.

Dental whitening is the easiest way to a healthier looking smile. Do you have an upcoming wedding, business, or family event in the Ohio area? At Easton Dentists we offer company plans and dental insurance. If you’re looking to dazzle with your whitest smile ever, contact Easton Dentists at 614-414-0111 and schedule an appointment today.

What is Scaling and Root Planing and Why Doesn’t my Insurance Consider it a Normal Tooth Cleaning?

Oct 20th, 2015
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Is your mouth in need of a thorough deep clean? Root planing and scaling can give your mouth a total turnaround and help fight against gum disease, but some hesitate to make the appointment due to dental insurance woes. Does insurance consider these procedures as a standard teeth cleaning? We’re looking at what scaling and root planing can do for you, and what your insurance has to say about it.

What is Scaling?

Sometimes referred to as “deep cleaning”, dental scaling is the process of removing harmful tartar and plaque buildup from your teeth. Left untreated, tartar and plaque buildup can attribute to gum disease. During the process of scaling, your dentist will either use a hand-held instrument, or an ultrasonic one. With a hand held instrument your dentist will identify severe tartar buildup and manually scale, or remove, plaque off of your teeth.

When using an ultrasonic instrument your dentist again will identify tartar buildup and chip it off through vibrations. The removed tartar is then washed away with water. When it comes to a nonsurgical treatment for gum disease, scaling is the way to go.

What is Root Planing?

Often combined with scaling, root planing is the act of treating gum disease. When gum disease gets severe, inflammation will cause the gum to separate from the root surface. This creates what is known as a periodontal pocket, a hard to clean area where bacteria begins to form. When your dentist performs a root planing he will remove calculus and dental plaque from the root surfaces.

Why Doesn’t my Insurance Consider These Options a Standard Tooth Cleaning?

Deep cleanings can be pricey, and dental insurance doesn’t always cover it. Some insurance plans may cover a portion of the cost, but this is not always the case. Dental insurance companies may consider this different from a standard cleaning due to the process involved. This is because unlike other cleaning procedures for your teeth, dental scaling and root planing involve cleaning below the gum line.

For more information on dental insurance, company plans, dental scaling, and root planing, schedule an appointment with Easton Dentist. Call (614) 414-0111 and schedule an appointment today.