What Are Some Recommendations Dentists Make For Sensitive Teeth?

Jan 17th, 2023
Easton Dentists Oct 5th, 2023

Have you ever gulped down an icy drink and felt more than just a little bit of “brain freeze”? If you feel severe or sharp pains in your mouth when you sip a hot drink? If you have a predisposition for oral pain due to flossing, brushing your teeth, or with food temperatures, you are likely suffering from tooth sensitivity.

It is estimated that over 40 million Americans are affected by tooth sensitivity, making it a prevalent concern within the dental patient community. Coping with tooth hypersensitivity can be challenging. However, individuals experiencing this issue should take comfort in the fact that effective treatments are available. Furthermore, numerous dental insurance plans cover procedures related to the management of sensitive teeth. We recommend consulting our insurance offerings to identify a plan that aligns with your specific requirements.

Causes Of Tooth Sensitivity
Where can this issue arise? Within a typical, well-maintained oral cavity, a protective layer of enamel shields the teeth. When this barrier is compromised, the tooth’s nerve can become more vulnerable to temperature sensitivity, leading to uncomfortable sensations in the gum area. Potential triggers for tooth sensitivity encompass the deterioration of dental fillings or enamel, the exposure of tooth roots, the presence of gum-related issues, the development of cavities, or the occurrence of tooth fractures.

Treating Sensitive Teeth
• Sensitive toothpaste. Oftentimes regular toothpaste contains ingredients that are simply too harsh for sensitive teeth. Many dentists recommend alternative options, such as Sensodyne® toothpaste or Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief, which both contain a mild ingredient list specifically designed for sensitive teeth.

• Use a precision toothbrush. Many precision brushes are designed with sensitive mouths in mind. The design of this brush lets you get into hard to reach areas of the mouth without causing irritation.

• A tooth inlay or crown. If your sensitivity is coming from a broken or flawed dental insert, steps can be taken by your dentist to correct the problem and get you back to sipping your hot-tea, problem free.

• Fluoride gel. Using a fluoride gel will reduce sensitivity in your teeth by strengthening tooth enamel over time.

Other options for correcting sensitive teeth is a surgical gum graft, or having a root canal performed. As always, one of the best ways to keep your mouth in tip-top shape is to visit your dentist regularly. Help keep your teeth their healthiest by scheduling a dental checkup with Easton Dentists. Call us today at (614) 414-0111.

Myths about Root Canals

Jul 7th, 2020
Easton Dentists Aug 3rd, 2020

When talking about dentistry, some people are still a little afraid of having someone poking around in their mouth with sharp objects. And as they see after a few appointments, there’s nothing to worry about. The root canal is one of the most feared dental procedures, and the same applies to it. There are a few big myths and misunderstandings about endodontic therapy (root canals).

A root canal is not a painful procedure.
Contrary to popular belief, a root canal is among the least painful procedures you can have done at a Columbus area dentist’s office! The myth about it being painful has stuck around for quite a long time. The last time root canals were painful was before the use of anesthetic to numb the area. The painful part most people think of is when they realize that they need a root canal; when their tooth is throbbing with pain from an infection.

An extraction is not a good alternative to a root canal.
The best teeth are your teeth. They already fit, your body makes them pretty strong, and they’re pretty hard to get out of your jaw anyway. It’s always best to keep your original teeth whenever possible. Extracting a tooth exposes more areas to infection and disease. In addition, the teeth around the gap will often be used as a bridge to hold an artificial, replacement tooth in place.

Root canals do not lead to other infections throughout the body.
Incorrect research was done circa 1910 about bacteria entering the bloodstream through a root canal. Every report has either refuted or been unable to replicate the original researcher’s findings. Natural bacteria live in your mouth no matter how often you brush your teeth, and these have no negative effect on you. In fact, your body is programmed to kill bacteria in your bloodstream.

Consider these myths debunked. Feeling a little more comfortable with root canals? Call The Dental Center at Easton to speak to a qualified professional about endodontic therapy.

What are the Signs of Needing a Root Canal?

Jun 11th, 2020
Easton Dentists Jul 1st, 2020

When it comes to endodontic therapy (root canals), there are many signs to indicate that you may need work done. With all dental work there are symptoms you may notice on your own and those that only a dentist can spot. The same is true with root canals, even though the most obvious signs you’ll be able to catch on your own. Here are a few things to keep an eye out for.

Tooth pain is the biggest indicator of needing a root canal. Persistent or recurring pain in a tooth on daily or monthly frequencies could be an indicator of a need for endodontic therapy. This can be anything from dull ache to unbearable pain. Whatever you have now, get it checked out by a dentist as soon as possible. If you need a root canal, the pain will only get worse the longer you put off your appointment. Another big sign is tenderness of the gums or anything more severe than that. Infected gums may ache, or they may swell noticeably even on the outside of your face.

Your dentist performs regular X-rays on your mouth, and these are the best way to detect low-grade infections. Dark spots (called a ‘radiolucency’) are indications of infected teeth. Similarly, more progressed infections will be visible to the naked eye as a tooth slightly darker than the teeth surrounding it.

While working, your dentist may sometimes notice that a tooth’s nerve has become exposed. This would eventually lead to internal infection, so they may opt to do a root canal at that time to save you the trouble of waiting until a dangerous and painful point down the line.

No website can help you with self-diagnosis. If you think you may exhibit some of the symptoms listed here, call The Dental Center at Easton (located in Columbus Ohio) to have a professional help diagnose what’s going on in your mouth.

What is a Root Canal?

Jun 4th, 2020
Easton Dentists Jul 1st, 2020

A root canal (aka endodontic therapy) is a common procedure used by dentists to clean out infected teeth. Teeth can become infected for a variety of reasons. Many times, the nerve inside a tooth becomes infected as a result of trauma – either a broken tooth or a hard bump that may not even leave any external blemishes. Sometimes, it can take years for a tooth to become infected and noticeably decay before you feel anything. A dentist may recommend endodontic therapy even if you don’t yet feel any pain.

Many patients get nervous when they hear the words “root canal.” Anyone who’s had a root canal procedure done can tell you that there’s almost no pain involved. A hundred years ago, before the popular use of anesthetic, this was true. Yet for some reason, this stereotype still lasts. The pain most people associate with root canals is actually from the infection before they seek help. Your dentist is invested in making endodontic therapy as relaxing as possible. He or she will apply anesthetic and protect the procedure area with a rubber dam to keep out any saliva. This dam allows you to swallow normally during the operation.

Next, the dentist drills a small hole into the inner part of your tooth to remove any infected pulp and dead nerve cells. This fluid is what’s causing the pain you’ve felt. Using varying sizes of tools, your dentist will then clean out the roots and remove any dangerous abscesses or liquid that lie in your jaw. At this point, your first procedure may be over. Not every root canal takes more than one appointment, but some will pause once the cleaning is done. You’ll leave with a temporary crown until your next appointment.

Once a tooth has been cleaned, it’s important to protect it against future infections. The spaces inside a tooth are commonly filled by gutta-percha, a semi-organic material made from the sap of gutta-percha trees. This natural latex is lightweight and durable. Finally, the tooth is capped with a crown and the tooth is just as strong as it was before!

Feeling recurring pain in your teeth? Call The Dental Center at Easton (serving the Columbus Metro Area) to talk to a qualified professional about if you’re a good candidate for a root canal and what you can expect from the procedure.

Root Canal Therapy: Nipping The Pain In The Bud

Jul 4th, 2018
Easton Dentists Sep 4th, 2018

Nothing comes close in terms of pain than a good old fashioned toothache. And while most of us devour pain killers -and sometimes even morphine- to lull the pain to sleep, a toothache always comes back, stronger, more unbearable than ever before. However, treating the root cause of the problem -and I mean that literally- is a surefire way to get rid of the pain for good, and that’s where root canal procedures come in. You may have heard about it before in passing, but what really is this miracle called root canal treatment after all.

Also known as endodontic therapy, root canal treatment is a dental procedure for eliminating infections from inside the tooth so as to prevent future infection. So, why root canal you may ask? Well, the pulp -the part of a tooth containing nerve tissue and blood vessels- is also referred to as the root canal.

A Few Fact About Root Canal Therapy

* The primary purpose of root canal therapy is to end the pain for good! Which is why it is used to eliminate the nerves located in the pulp -root canals- of the tooth. For your own information, nerves being the source of all bodily sensations, removing them has the obvious effect of making your gums and teeth insensitive to pain.

* Make no mistake about it, it’s a relatively painful pain relieving treatment. However, the flip-side to that is it’s a once off procedure that leaves you with a pain free root canal.

The stages in the dental procedure are pretty straightforward perhaps even a toddler can do better than a regular Columbus Dentist at The Dental Center.

It all starts with the cleaning of the root canal while your under anesthesia. The root canal is decontaminated and filled with dental cement, after which a crown is added to reinforce the brittle and fragile tooth.

 

A Dental Approach To Stem Cells

Nov 5th, 2017
Easton Dentists Dec 5th, 2017

Researchers at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas have developed a new method for extracting the pulp from the roots of teeth. This new method allows for the harvest of four times as many stem cells as compared to other pulp extraction methods.

Stem cells may be the key to developing new, more effective therapies and treatments for many chronic and terminal diseases. Stem cells can be extracted from nearly any living tissue, but gathering enough to work with and keeping them alive until they are needed often poses a serious challenge for researchers. One promising source of stem cells is the pulp of extracted teeth. When healthy teeth are extracted, such as during wisdom tooth surgery or orthodontic treatment, they contain viable pulp from which stem cells can be extracted.

The pulp of a tooth is home to two important types of stem cells. The first, called pluripotent stem cells, can become any cell within the organism from which they are extracted. The second kind, called multipotent stem cells, can become a specific type of cell within the organism from which they are extracted. These stem cells can, theoretically, be stored and used later in the life of the person to whom the tooth belongs if this person develops an illness that stem cells can cure. Currently, however, we are unsure how long-term storage might affect these cells.

As the researchers began their attempts to extract stem cells from the pulp of teeth, they found that their methods for reaching the pulp resulted in the destruction of many viable stem cells. So, they invented a device called the “Tooth Cracker 5000.” This device allows for the clean split of a tooth and, consequently, for the preservation of most of the pulp’s stem cells.

The researcher’s new-found ability to harvest comparatively large quantities of stem cells from the pulp of teeth offers a hopeful step toward future medical innovations and the development of life-saving cures.

Root Canal Treatment

Feb 16th, 2015
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Your teeth are meant to last a lifetime.  Brushing, flossing, and proper oral hygiene help to keep your teeth strong and healthy over the course of your life.  Sometimes, however, damage can occur to a tooth, most often from a deep cavity or an injury that causes a tooth to crack, and this can cause the interior of the tooth to become infected.  The infection can damage the pulp of the tooth, which is a network of blood vessels and nerves.  If left untreated, the damaged pulp can cause infection that will damage the bone around the tooth, which will then lead to swelling and pain.  If the damaged tooth becomes infected, your dentist may have to preform a root canal to save the tooth.

A root canal involves opening the tooth, removing the damaged pulp, cleaning, shaping, filling and sealing the tooth.  Root canals are a very common and effective procedure used to save the infected tooth from having to be removed.  Root canals do require two appointments because a permeate crown needs to be fitted and molded before it can be applied to the tooth.  During the first appointment, your dentist will remove the infected pulp and drain any abscesses.  The root canal will then be cleaned and shaped for a temporary filling.  During this visit impressions will be taken so a proper fitting crown can be molded for the infected tooth.  During your second visit, your dentist will check the tooth and make sure all of the infection has cleared.  Once this has been completed, the permanent crown will be applied to the tooth.  Any adjustments to the shape of the crown will be made so that the new crown does not affect your bite.

After your root canal has been completed, your tooth will look and feel as good as new.  Proper oral hygiene will help prevent any additional infections to the tooth.  If you are experiencing any sensitivity or discomfort, schedule an appointment with your dentist today to address the issue and prevent any further decay.

How Do You Know If You Need A Root Canal?

Feb 9th, 2015
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

If you’ve been experiencing tooth sensitivity or pain, how do you know if you need a root canal?  This answer unfortunately is sometimes painfully obvious, and that pain is caused within the affected tooth.

Anyone can experience some degree of tooth discomfort.  An issue within a tooth’s root canal is not necessarily always the cause for discomfort.  You might experience sensitivity to hot or cold liquids or foods, which isn’t usually a sign of a serious problem.  These symptoms could also be the result of a loose filling, a small area of decay, or an exposed root surface.  If you are experiencing sharp pain that occurs when you bite down, pain that lingers after you’ve consumed hot or cold food or drinks, or a constant ache from an area that is difficult to pinpoint, these may all be symptoms of infection or inflammation within the root canal.  An infection within the pulp tissue of a tooth is typically treated with a root canal.

A root canal dentist will be the only one who can determine whether the pulp tissue inside your tooth is the cause of the pain.  If this is confirmed, then a root canal procedure can be the most effective way of relieving the pain and preventing further damage to the area.

If you ever begin to feel severe aching or pressure in your mouth that does not subside, or if you begin to notice sensitivity and swelling in your gums, don’t wait for the problem to fix itself!  These symptoms are all major reasons to schedule an appointment with your dentist and have the issue checked out and treated.

The Basics of Root Canal

Dec 8th, 2009
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

A26D69VHQ3GT root canal is a treatment used to repair and save a tooth that is badly decayed or becomes infected. During a root canal procedure, the nerve and pulp are removed and the inside of the tooth is cleaned and sealed. Without treatment, the tissue surrounding the tooth will become infected and abscesses may form, causing further damage and extensive pain.

“Root canal” is the term used to describe the natural cavity within the center of the tooth. The pulp or pulp chamber is the soft area within the root canal. The tooth’s nerve lies within the root canal.

A tooth’s nerve is not vitally important to a tooth’s health and function after the tooth has emerged through the gums. Its only function is sensory — to provide the sensation of hot or cold. The presence or absence of a nerve will not affect the day-to-day functioning of the tooth.

What Damages a Tooth’s Nerve and Pulp?

A tooth’s nerve and pulp can become irritated, inflamed, and infected due to deep decay, repeated dental procedures on a tooth, and/or large fillings, a crack or chip in the tooth, or trauma to the face.

How do You Know if You Need a Root Canal?

Sometimes, symptoms are not apparent. However, signs you may need a root canal include:

  • Severe tooth pain upon chewing or application of pressure
  • Prolonged sensitivity/pain to heat or cold temperatures
  • Discoloration (a darkening) of the tooth
  • Swelling and tenderness in the nearby gums
  • A persistent or recurring pimple on the gums

What Happens During a Root Canal?

A root canal requires one or more office visits and can be performed by a dentist or endodontist, which is a dentist who specializes in the causes, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases and injuries of the human dental pulp or the nerve of the tooth. The choice of which type of dentist to use depends on the difficulty of the root canal procedure needed in your particular tooth and the general dentist’s comfort level in working on your tooth.