Electrical or Manual Toothbrush: Which is Better?

Oct 26th, 2018
Easton Dentists Oct 26th, 2018

This is one of our most frequently asked questions! Our answer? It’s not the brush that matters, it’s who’s doing the brushing.

Let’s break that down. The goal of tooth brushing is to remove plaque from your teeth on a consistent (daily!) basis, so that we prevent the buildup of tartar which leads to tooth decay. A manual toothbrush is a great and inexpensive tool that helps us do just that. Make sure to brush two minutes per day, twice a day. Gently brush ALL surfaces and make sure to reach those back molars.

For some people, it can be difficult to brush properly with a manual toothbrush. Those with some form of motor disability or arthritis may benefit from using an electric toothbrush. An electric brush can also be helpful for kids or anyone with braces.
The same tooth brushing rules apply – two times per day, two minutes at a time. One advantage of an electric toothbrush is that some have a built-in timer. If you’re one of those quick brushers who has a hard time making it to two minutes, consider using a timed electric brush.

At your next dental visit, ask us whether we think you would do better with a manual or electric brush! And, as always, don’t forget to floss!

How Apples are Good for Your Teeth

Oct 5th, 2018
Easton Dentists Oct 5th, 2018

Good for my teeth

People have been asserting that “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” since the 19 th century. While it may not necessarily be true that those who eat apples never have to see a doctor, apples certainly have great health benefits for our bodies! Did you know they can even be good for our teeth? Let’s take a look at what the research says …

It’s widely thought that chewing a crisp, fresh apple can help brush away plaque on our teeth. We’re not too sure on this one, as some studies show a higher plaque content on teeth after eating an apple. At the same time, there is evidence to suggest some polyphenols in apples can lower the ability of cavity-causing bacteria to adhere to teeth. Further, some studies have shown that the antioxidants in apples can help prevent periodontal disease.

Apples even contain a (very) small amount of fluoride. This is worth noting, as fluoride is so important in helping prevent cavities.

Lastly, the act of chewing an apple stimulates saliva production. Saliva helps wash away food debris and bacteria. Remember, though, apples contain sugar and acid so it’s best not to go overboard with them.

You can even swish with water after eating one to wash away some of the sugar left behind. As the science continues to look into how apples affect our teeth, one thing we know is true: regular dental visits, along with daily tooth brushing and flossing, is your best defense against tooth decay! Schedule an appointment today!

Don’t Overdo the Sports Drinks

Jun 9th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jul 9th, 2018

As the summer heats up, you may find that you’re tempted to load up on sports drinks like Gatorade and Powerade. These beverages taste great, but they shouldn’t be your go-to drink. In fact, if you’re not engaged in the strenuous physical activity for which these drinks were designed, you should avoid them entirely.

In addition to the fact that sports drinks often contain a lot of sugar and other not-so-healthy ingredients, they tend to be very acidic. The acid in these beverages can destroy the enamel on your teeth. In fact, just five consecutive days of drinking these acidic beverages can negatively affect your enamel.

As acid destroys your enamel, it makes your teeth more vulnerable to bacteria. As a result, you may experience increased tooth staining, decay, and hypersensitivity. The best way to avoid these dental issues is to do whatever you can to protect your enamel.

If you are set on drinking sports drinks, you should be sure to rinse your mouth with water after drinking them. Doing so will rinse some of the acid away from your teeth before it can do much damage. In addition, you should brush your teeth about an hour after drinking these beverages. It’s best not to brush your teeth immediately after drinking something acidic because the enamel on your teeth will be in a weakened state and could be brushed away.

We know a nice, cold sports drink is tempting on a hot day, but it’s best not to make a habit of drinking these beverages. Instead, try to primarily drink water.

If you believe your teeth have been damaged by excessive consumption of acidic beverages, give us a call today. We will examine your teeth and give you pointers for reversing damage if possible and preventing damage in the future. We hope you have a great, tooth-healthy summer!

Teaching Life-Long Dental Health

May 8th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jun 1st, 2018

Having children means you suddenly have a lot of responsibility. One of these responsibilities is maintaining their dental health. Even before your baby has teeth, there are steps you can take to prepare him or her for life-long dental health. Below, you’ll find some tips that will help you to protect your children’s teeth throughout their lives.

Birth to One Year

For the first six months of your baby’s life, all you need to do to promote dental health is to ensure he has plenty of nutrition. For a baby so young, that means plenty of breast milk or formula. In addition, you should avoid leaving the baby alone with his bottle as this can result in the baby sucking on the bottle long after it’s empty, which can cause teeth to come in crooked.

At about six months, your baby will start to get his first teeth. When this happens, you should schedule your first visit with a pediatric dentist. You should also begin to very gently brush the baby’s gums with a soft-bristle tooth brush that has just been dampened with water.

One Year to Six Years

Start teaching your baby about the importance of dental health from an early age. This can be as simple as picking up a few children’s books at your local library that will teach your child why healthy teeth matter.

During this time, you’ll also need to brush your child’s teeth for him while he watches you in the mirror. You should consult your pediatric dentist to determine what type of toothpaste and how much of it you should use. You should also be taking your child to the dentist for checkups about every six months as well as if you ever suspect a cavity has formed.

It’s also a good idea to brush your own teeth in front of your child so that he can see you care about the health of your own teeth.

Six Years to Eleven Years

During this time, your child should lose his baby teeth and they should be replaced by adult teeth. The exact timing of losing teeth and growing new ones is different for every child. By six years of age, your child should also be brushing his own teeth, although you may wish to supervise to be sure he is not missing any areas of his mouth. As your child grows, you should be able to trust him to brush his teeth well since you have been teaching him the importance of doing so since he was a child.

Eleven Years and Up

You should be able to trust your child to care for his own dental health independently. It is still important, however, to take him for dental checkups every six months. Once all of his adult teeth have come in, it may also be necessary to take him to an orthodontist for braces. You should also continue to have occasional conversations about the importance of dental health.

We hope these tips will help you to raise kids who are set up for life-long dental health. When it’s time for their dental checkups, be sure to give us a call!

What Does Smoking Do to Your Oral Health?

May 7th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jun 1st, 2018

We all know smoking is bad for our health. In fact, smoking is the number one cause of preventable disease and death in the United States and is linked to 480,000 deaths each year. Despite these stark statistics, about 17% of adults in the United States smoke. One thing smokers may not realize is that smoking can significantly damage their oral health.

Smoking and other forms of tobacco use can stain teeth and cause bad breath. In addition, smoking has been found to alter the microbiome of smokers’ mouths. Our oral microbiomes consist of carefully balanced levels of various bacteria. When these levels are altered, there can be serious health consequences.

Over time, the effects of smoking and tobacco use on oral health can grow more severe. In addition to cavities and gum disease, tobacco use can lead to increased rates of oral cancers.

As you can see, tobacco use is detrimental to your oral health in many ways. Luckily, quitting is always an option and the sooner you quit, the better. Scientists have ever found that your oral microbiome will return to its natural state after you quit smoking, although they have yet to determine exactly how long this takes.

If you’re ready to reclaim your health by quitting smoking, the Dental Center team is here to offer our support. Contact us today to learn more about how smoking can damage your oral health. We also recommend calling 1-800-QUIT-NOW for guidance regarding quitting tobacco usage. We know it will be difficult to quit, but we’re certain you have the strength to do it. Just keep reminding yourself that you deserve a long, healthy, and happy life!

The History of the Tooth Fairy

Apr 21st, 2018
Easton Dentists May 1st, 2018

As a dentist, the tooth fairy is particularly close to my heart. She makes the potentially scary event of losing a baby tooth something to look forward to and she encourages good dental hygiene because, after all, no fairy wants to dirty tooth. Recently, I started wondering about the origins of this fairy. How did we begin to tell our children that if they put a tooth beneath their pillow, a fairy would come in the night and take it in exchange for a tooth?

As it turns out, the tooth fairy is a relatively new addition to the folklore of childhood, but the ritualistic disposal of a child’s lost tooth has a long, interesting history. In some cultures, teeth were buried, burned, thrown over a house, or placed near a mouse hole. Over time, the role of the mouse in the disposal of baby teeth grew and, even today, Spanish children leave their teeth for a little rat to take.

In a French story called La Bonne Petite Souris, a good mouse rescues a queen by knocking out the evil king’s teeth. This good mouse then turns out to be a fairy. So, the tooth mouse has become a tooth fairy. It wasn’t until after World War II, however, that the tooth fairy became a part of most American children’s childhoods. This may be thanks, in part, to Tinkerbell and Cinderella, who made fairies a big part of the childhoods of children in the 1950s.

Today, the tooth fairy is an important part of many children’s childhoods. It can also be a great tool for parents who need to encourage better dental hygiene in their children. Just be sure to let them know the tooth fairy likes pearly white teeth!

Foods That Cause Tooth Decay

Apr 11th, 2018
Easton Dentists Apr 11th, 2018

When it comes to tooth decay, it’s important to know the main culprit – acid. Acid is what eats away at our enamel and causes cavities.

Acid can enter our mouths in one of two ways: either directly through what we eat (citrus fruits, for example), or as a byproduct when oral bacteria consume the sugars that we eat.

Ultimately, a simple way to identify foods that cause tooth decay is to ask whether it’s acidic or sweet/starchy.

Acidic foods include things like citrus fruits, tomatoes, vinegar, kombucha and sour candy.

Sweet/starchy foods include things like candy, soda or sugar-sweetened beverages, fruit, bread,cereal, pasta and crackers.

The longer these things interact with your teeth, the greater the chance for tooth decay to occur. For example, sipping on soda throughout the day, or chewing a gooey caramel treat, increases the amount of sugar that coat your teeth. Bacteria love to feast on this sugar, creating an acidic environment and putting your teeth at risk for decay.

To help protect your teeth against tooth decay:
– Reduce your consumption of sweets and refined starches
– Enjoy acidic foods in moderation or as part of a meal
– Decrease or eliminate your consumption of soda or sugar-sweetened beverages
– Swish with water after meals and snacks
– Maintain good oral hygiene to brush away plaque buildup (floss at least once a day and brush twice a day)

And, as always, make sure to visit us regularly so we can remove tartar buildup and assess for early signs of decay!

Make an APPOINTMENT today!

How to Brush your Teeth

Feb 26th, 2018
Easton Dentists Feb 26th, 2018

If you’re reading this, you’ve probably been brushing your teeth for many years. The question is, have you been brushing them the right way? Below, you’ll find some of the most important pointers for keeping your pearly whites healthy and looking good for the long term.

1. Take your time

Brushing your teeth should take at least two full minutes. This might not seem like a very long time, but, when you’re brushing, it will likely feel quite long. The best way to make sure you are brushing for long enough is to set a timer on your phone or listen to about half of an average-length song.

2. Use the right brush

Not all toothbrushes are created equally. The best choice in brush is a round-headed electric brush. If electric brushes aren’t for you, we recommend using a manual brush with soft bristles and a small head. The soft bristles are plenty strong enough to remove debris and plaque from your teeth without causing too much wear and tear on your enamel and the small head allows you to better clean hard-to-reach areas of your mouth.

3. Brush everywhere

We tend to brush our teeth where it shows. So, the fronts of our teeth often receive the bulk of our attention. In addition to brushing the fronts of our top and back teeth, however, it is also important to brush the inner surfaces of the teeth, the chewing surfaces, and the tongue. Brushing thoroughly can keep your teeth healthy and, as an added perk, your breath smelling minty fresh.

4. Use the right technique

Although it may make you feel that you’ve cleaned your teeth well, there is no need to furiously saw away at your teeth. Instead, the best approach is to tilt your brush at a 45-degree angle from the gumline and gently roll the brush away from the gumline. Then, gently brush every surface of each tooth using short back-and-forth strokes and, finally, brush your tongue to remove bacteria and freshen your breath.

We hope these toothbrushing tips will help you to keep your smile healthy and bright. In addition to brushing your teeth properly, it is important to visit your dentist for regular checkups. We’re looking forward to seeing you in our office soon!

Avoid These Foods for a Healthier Smile

Jan 30th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 30th, 2018

A healthy smile starts with a healthy diet. In addition to making sure your diet contains plenty of nutritious and vitamin-heavy foods, there are a few foods and beverages you ought to avoid as much as possible. Below, you’ll find a list of some cavity-causing culprits and an explanation of why they cause so much damage to teeth.

1. Ice

This might seem like a strange item to top the list. After all, ice is just frozen water, right? That’s true and ice is totally harmless when used to cool a beverage. It only starts to cause problems when people chew on it. Ice is so hard that crunching on it can damage your enamel and leave your teeth susceptible to dental issues, such as chipped teeth and loosened crowns.

2. Alcohol

Drinking too much alcohol can lead to tooth decay and oral infections, such as gum disease. This is because an excess of alcohol can cause a decrease in the saliva flow to your mouth. Saliva washes away food particles and bacteria and provides protection to the soft tissues in your mouth. When you do not have enough saliva, your mouth becomes more prone to dental issues.

3. Bread

Bread might seem pretty harmless, but it can actually cause some real dental issues. The problem is that, as soon as we start chewing bread, our saliva breaks down the starches and almost immediately converts them to sugar. The sticky, sugary substance that bread becomes once we start to chew it can stick to teeth and provide fuel for cavity-causing bacteria.

4. Dried fruits

Although they often seem to be the healthy snack option, dried fruits can actually cause real damage to your teeth. This is because they are full of natural sugars and the juices that would normally work to quickly rinse this sugar from your teeth have been removed during the drying process. As a result extremely sugary dried fruits often stick to our teeth, where they quickly become food for cavity-causing bacteria.

Before you get too concerned, just remember that it all comes down to moderation. We’re not asking you to entirely give up any tooth-damaging food or beverage. Instead, we simply suggest that you limit your intake of these items and that you always follow them up with a thorough cleaning of your teeth. In addition, by following your meals and sweet beverages with water, you can rinse away food particles that could fuel cavity-causing bacteria.

How Often Should You See the Dentist

Jan 29th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 29th, 2018

We love our patients, so we’d be more than happy to see you every day! Alas, we realize that’s not really possible to visit Easton in Columbus, OH everyday, so here are some more realistic guidelines for making appointments.

In general, it all depends on your oral health status and your health history.

For most patients, the optimal frequency to visit the dentist is twice a year. In six months,
enough tartar and plaque can build up to require a dental check-up and cleaning, especially if your dental hygiene isn’t as rigorous as it should be.

For others with gum disease, a genetic predisposition for plaque build-up or cavities, or a
weakened immune system, you’ll need to visit more frequently for optimal care.

Depending on where you fall in those categories, we will prescribe the necessary frequency to keep your optimal health.

It’s important to keep your routine visits with us so that:
• We can check for problems that you might not see or feel.
• We can find early signs of decay (decay doesn’t become visible or cause pain until it reaches more advanced stages).
• We can treat any other oral health problems found (generally, the earlier a problem is found, the more manageable it is).

There you have it! Those are the brass tacks for how often you should schedule an appointment.

Remember, we offer a variety of different hours to make it the most convenient for you!  Mondays and Wednesdays we are here for late appointments, Tuesday and Fridays we start really early, and of course we have lunchtime appointments everyday! If you need to schedule, you can do that request an appointment now!

But if it is not time for your next appointment, don’t let it keep you from stopping in and saying hi whenever you’re in the neighborhood! We are really close to Gahanna, New Albany, Westerville, and all those Easton neighborhoods!  We love seeing your smile!