Trouble Thinking? Maybe it's Your Teeth

Nov 16th, 2021
Easton Dentists Jan 2nd, 2022

Though it may seem odd, good oral care such as regular brushing, flossing and trips to the dentist, may help aging adults keep their thinking skills intact, according to a U.S. study. Research has already established an association between poor oral health and heart disease, stroke and diabetes, as well as Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers from Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York found that gum disease could also influence brain function through several mechanisms, such as causing inflammation throughout the body, which is a risk factor for loss of mental function. The study also found that adults with the highest levels of this pathogen were two times more likely to fail three-digit reverse subtraction tests.

The study, reported in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, was based on more than 2,350 men and women who were tested for periodontitis and completed numerous thinking skills tests as part of a national survey.

Overall 5.7 percent of the adults had trouble completing certain memory tasks, 6.5 percent had impaired delayed recall, and 22.1 percent had trouble with serial subtractions.

But those with the levels of the pathogen were nearly three times more likely to struggle with the verbal memory tests, and twice as likely to fail on both delayed verbal recall and subtraction tests.

“Although the results are preliminary, they suggest that further exploration of relationships between oral health and cognition is warranted,” they concluded, “Although results presented here are preliminary and inconclusive, a growing body of evidence supports exploration of a possible association between poor oral health and incident dementia.”

Common Dental Problems Dentists Face

Aug 4th, 2021
Easton Dentists Oct 2nd, 2021

Every day, Dentists, such as yours in Columbus Ohio, face some common dental problems, some more common than others. At first, some of these problems may not be serious. If ignored and not addressed, eventually, they can lead to serious problems.

Here are some of the common problems that dentists face daily:

Bad Breath

Bad breath, also technically known as Halitosis, is a common dental problem that many individuals have. Bad breath can be caused by dry mouth, cavities, gum disease, bacteria on the tongue, and even oral cancers.

Even though a majority of individuals use mouthwash to stop bad breath, mouthwash may just be masking the underlying problem. In rare cases, there may be a serious concern that needs to be addressed.

Cavities

There are different forms of tooth decay, but the most common form of decay that dentists face are cavities.

Cavities occur when a sticky and hard substance called Plaque produce acids that erode the tooth enamel. Plaque is formed by a combination of bacteria, sugar and starches. Depending on how advanced the cavity has spread, in most cases, a filling would be a proper procedure to fix a cavity. However, in more serious cases, a root canal would be the proper course of treatment.

Preventing cavities and tooth decay is relatively easy: brush your teeth at least twice a day, floss daily, go to your regular checkups and eat healthy by avoiding foods that are heavy in starches and sugars.

Gum Disease

Gingivitis and Periodontitis are infections of the gums and the soft tissue of the mouth. These infections are also one of the main causes of all tooth decay among adults.

On the surface, these infections may not be serious, but gum disease is strongly linked to heart disease and stroke.

To prevent gum diseases, it is critical to brush at least twice a day and floss.

Unattractive Smile

Although unattractive smiles are not considered a medical dental problem, they may be considered a problem to people who are unhappy with their smile. Unattractive smiles are a reason why individuals seek treatment to correct these problems.

A smile is important to an individual’s self-esteem. Fortunately, with advancements and techniques in dental sciences, virtually everyone can have a smile that they can be happy with. Through teeth whitening, dental implants, dental bridges, dental partials, or any other cosmetic work, your dentist can achieve your perfect smile.
If you believe that you have any of these common dental problems, it is highly advised that you see a dentist. Although these minor dental problems may not seem serious at first, as time progresses, these could become severe.

At The Dental Center at Easton Town Center, Dr. Glimer, an experienced board certified dentist, deeply cares and understands your dental concerns. Our staff wants you to know that we are highly trained and that we pride ourselves on providing the best care and attention you need to keep your smile healthy. If you believe you have any concerns above or questions regarding your oral health, make an appointment with us today!

Acid Reflux And Tooth Sensitivity

Jun 21st, 2021
Easton Dentists Jul 16th, 2021

As if acid reflux wasn’t painful enough, now your teeth are aching. Are acid reflux and tooth sensitivity related? We have the answer.

Do you have acid reflux? Common symptoms of acid reflux include a burning sensation within the chest and throat, dysphagia, sore or hoarse throat, the feeling of a blockage or lump within the throat, and of course the acid reflux itself; or sour regurgitation of ingested foods and liquids that comes up with a burning sensation. While this illness has much to do with heartburn, did you know it could also have a staggering effect on the health and wellness of your teeth? We’re looking at how acid reflux and tooth sensitivity are related.

Acid reflux is caused by a backup of bile or stomach acids that make their way into the esophagus, causing pain and discomfort along the way. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reported that 7-million Americans suffer from acid reflux and may not realize the damage it is doing to their teeth until decay has already become severe. One way to ensure the health of your teeth is to inform your dentist of any medical conditions you may have, including acid reflux. This will help your dentist best determine which procedures and medications you should be prescribed. He may also be able to help you develop a safer diet for your stomach, and your teeth.

Other ways to avoid the negative effects of acid reflux is to avoid ingesting acidic foods and beverages, wash your mouth out with water immediately after reflux and avoid brushing your teeth for at least one hour after an acid reflux experience. These will help you stand on guard against this frustrating illness.

Contact The Dental Center to discuss your relief options from severe tooth aches and sensitivity. Call today (614) 414-0111 to schedule an appointment.

Let’s Talk About Different Types Of Dental Crowns

Jan 20th, 2021
Easton Dentists Feb 3rd, 2021
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A crown is a prosthetic device that can be cemented onto a surrounding implant or natural tooth structure. The primary function of a crown is to cover an implant, a damaged tooth or a tooth that has recently undergone root canal therapy. Also referred to as caps, dental crowns have both functional and aesthetic benefits. When used to cover severely damaged teeth or teeth in which the tooth pulp has been removed, crowns can both protect and preserve the underlying tooth structure. When used to cover weak, chipped or stain teeth, they can also brighten, balance and enhance the smile. Following is everything you need to know about the different types of dental crowns that are currently available, along with tips for choosing the best crown type for you.

Understanding The Benefits Of Dental Crowns

When placed by a competent dentist and properly maintained, dental crowns can last for a very long time. Crowns have been used by many dental providers to create a solid and well-balanced occlusion or bite, improve the shape, size and alignment of the teeth and protect them after root canal therapy, impact injuries and other forms of stress or harm. At their best, they’re attractive, difficult to distinguish from the surrounding natural teeth, and capable of performing or enhancing the function of a weakened tooth.

There are four, basic crown types that patients and their providers can choose from. Each of the four types of dental crowns have their own benefits and drawbacks. Moreover, certain crown types may be better suited to some individuals and circumstances than others. A reputable and competent dentist will be able to help you find the best crown type for your budget, your needs, and your oral health and cosmetic goals.

Types of Dental Crowns

Ceramic Crowns:

Comprised of durable, porcelain-based material, ceramic crowns are commonly used in the restoration of the front teeth. Dentists and patients prefer ceramic caps in this location given their ability to seamlessly blend with the color and overall appearance of natural tooth structures.

Crowns made from porcelain fused to metal:

Crowns made from porcelain fused to metal are considered significantly stronger than ceramic crowns and as a result, somewhat superior as well. This, however, is primarily true in terms of their overall durability. In terms of aesthetics, they are not the first choice when looking for a cap that will blend inconspicuously with the front teeth. Connected to a metal underlay, porcelain-fused metal cap bond better with the natural teeth than do ceramic caps.

Layered zirconia crowns:

Layered zirconia crowns are hailed for having greater flexural and overall strength than all-ceramic caps. They also provide optimal aesthetic benefits given that they are unlikely to develop problems with gingival graying or black lines. These are often recommended in instances in which metal cores, tooth discoloration, and implant abutments must be concealed.

Gold alloys:

Gold alloy crowns are comprised of a mixture of copper, gold, and other, lesser metals. Not only do these crowns bond firmly to the natural teeth, but they do not cause any significant wear and tear to these underlying structures in the process. Given their noticeable color, these are typically used at the back of the mouth where they are unlikely to be seen. The primary drawback of gold alloy improvements is that these procedures are rarely covered in part or in full by most basic, dental health plans and the materials used can be significantly more costly than those use in ceramic, base metal alloys or porcelain fused to metal caps.

Base metal alloy crowns:

Base metal alloy crowns are comprised of corrosion-resistant, non-noble metals. These make very strong crowns. For many consumers, this option is the most cost-effective solution to a damaged tooth or one that has recently had the tooth pulp removed. Crown placement procedures that involve base metal alloy caps are often fully covered by dental insurance plans. One of the greatest benefits in using these types of dental crowns, however, lies in the fact that they require the least amount of healthy tooth for placement. Thus, they are ideal for use in instances in which much of the natural tooth structure has chipped or actually broken off.

At Easton Dentists, Dr. Glimer and our experienced team in Columbus Ohio know what is best for your teeth, especially if a crown is involved. If you have any questions or are ready to schedule your next visit to, contact our office, and our team will be happy to assist you in any way we can!

What is a Root Canal?

Jun 4th, 2020
Easton Dentists Jul 1st, 2020

A root canal (aka endodontic therapy) is a common procedure used by dentists to clean out infected teeth. Teeth can become infected for a variety of reasons. Many times, the nerve inside a tooth becomes infected as a result of trauma – either a broken tooth or a hard bump that may not even leave any external blemishes. Sometimes, it can take years for a tooth to become infected and noticeably decay before you feel anything. A dentist may recommend endodontic therapy even if you don’t yet feel any pain.

Many patients get nervous when they hear the words “root canal.” Anyone who’s had a root canal procedure done can tell you that there’s almost no pain involved. A hundred years ago, before the popular use of anesthetic, this was true. Yet for some reason, this stereotype still lasts. The pain most people associate with root canals is actually from the infection before they seek help. Your dentist is invested in making endodontic therapy as relaxing as possible. He or she will apply anesthetic and protect the procedure area with a rubber dam to keep out any saliva. This dam allows you to swallow normally during the operation.

Next, the dentist drills a small hole into the inner part of your tooth to remove any infected pulp and dead nerve cells. This fluid is what’s causing the pain you’ve felt. Using varying sizes of tools, your dentist will then clean out the roots and remove any dangerous abscesses or liquid that lie in your jaw. At this point, your first procedure may be over. Not every root canal takes more than one appointment, but some will pause once the cleaning is done. You’ll leave with a temporary crown until your next appointment.

Once a tooth has been cleaned, it’s important to protect it against future infections. The spaces inside a tooth are commonly filled by gutta-percha, a semi-organic material made from the sap of gutta-percha trees. This natural latex is lightweight and durable. Finally, the tooth is capped with a crown and the tooth is just as strong as it was before!

Feeling recurring pain in your teeth? Call The Dental Center at Easton (serving the Columbus Metro Area) to talk to a qualified professional about if you’re a good candidate for a root canal and what you can expect from the procedure.

Suffering From Fractured Teeth? We Can Help!

Feb 20th, 2020
Easton Dentists Mar 2nd, 2020

Fractured teeth are quite common, especially as we age. There are several types of fractures that affect the teeth, and treatment options vary depending on the condition of the fracture.

From small cracks or fissures, to actual split teeth with root damage, Dr. Gilmer can address and correct your this type of tooth damage. Don’t wait to have your fractured teeth examined – the longer it is ignored, the greater the long term health impact can be.

There are several types of fractures, and The Dental Clinic at Easton can treat them all. The most minor fracture is a craze line, or minor crack, which is simply a surface crack affecting the enamel of the tooth. These don’t need any treatment, but if they bother you cosmetically you can consider polishing, or dental veneers.

Other cracked tooth damage can be quite significant, involving the tooth as a whole. These cracks often affect the surface and even the nerve of the tooth- and can be treated with typical dental filling materials such as those used in filling cavities. The pulp may be damaged as well, which may require a root canal.

Minor chips on the teeth are quite common, and most don’t require treatment for the architecture of the tooth. Many minor chips can be polished, or treated with a bit of filling material to address the appearance of the tooth.

Split teeth are the most serious and dangerous type of fractures. In these cases, most patients experience significant pain and tooth sensitivity. Treatments include root canals, followed by crowns. Severe vertical breaks may require the removal of the tooth, and a dental implant to restore your smile.

It’s important to visit your dentist for any type of tooth pain in order for a correct diagnosis.

Do You Have a Dental First Aid Kit?

Feb 13th, 2020
Easton Dentists Mar 2nd, 2020

It is always a good idea to have a first aid kit in your home.  Inside, you more than likely have all the essentials: Band-Aids, gauze, tape, antibiotic ointment, wrap, and some sort of ice pack.  This simple but useful kit plays a crucial role for any family in the event of an emegergengy.  It is designed to quickly and efficiently treat injuries that are bad enough to need care but do not need the immediate attention of a medical professional.

However, there is another first aid kit that every home should have.  Dental first aid kits are a necessity for homes because they provide the specialized care that is meant exclusively for oral care.

While there may be some similarities between the two kits, both should be kept fully stocked in order to take care of any dental emergency that may arise.

  • Floss.  Whether you prefer the traditional roll of floss or the one-time-use sticks, having a handy supply of floss will help relieve much of the irritation that can be associated with eating certain foods.
  • Mild pain medication.  You may use this to stop pain entirely or to make it subside until you can get proper care.  Either way, having an emergency supply of pain medication is never a bad idea.
  • Oral Wax.  Especially for people with braces or any other piece of oral equipment, wax can be placed on and around any sharp protrusion to ease pain and reduce the chance of further injury.  If you’re not sure where to get oral wax, ask your dentist where you can get your hands on it.
  • Emergency ice packs.  When swelling needs to be controlled, ice packs are the quick and effective solution.  If something traumatic happens and you need to make an emergency trip to your hospital or dentist, you’ll want to use an ice pack during the trip.
  • Cotton balls.  Bleeding is never wanted but when it does occur, you’ll want to be ready.  A cotton ball is typically a safe and effective way to help stop the bleeding.
  • Camellia teabags.  This may sound out of place amongst medical supplies but tea has been used for centuries to help sooth oral traumas.  They can even help stop bleeding after oral surgery.
  • Your dentist’s contact information.  Your dentist knows your teeth better than anyone else so who better to help during an emergency?

In the case of an emergency, there is nothing more important than your health.  A dental first aid kit is the first step to take in ensuring your oral health.  For more information on keeping your oral health in order, call us today!

A Whiter Smile Is Possible!

Jan 13th, 2020
Easton Dentists Feb 1st, 2020

Most people would not mind whiter teeth.  As you can guess, the staff at The Dental Center at Easton think whiter teeth are great!.  Whiter teeth can have a possitive impact on your appearance, making you look healthier and encourage more self-confidence during social engagements. Sound good to you?

Though there are a number of toothpastes on the market that claim to whiten and brighten your smile better than others, the truth is that virtually every brand of toothpaste contains an abrasive formula that helps to scrub away stains.  Some brands are more abrasive than others, making them slightly more effective at removing light stains on the surface of your teeth but none of them can do the job fully.

Unfortunately, even the toughest toothpaste will be unable to remove the deep stains that tend to accumulate as we age.  Beverages such as coffee and tea, habits such as smoking, and darkly pigmented foods like berries can darken the teeth over the course of years.  Some of our patients even have tooth discoloration as the result of a childhood illness or a tetracycline medication that was administered while the enamel was still forming.  You will need to find some other solution for complete satisfaction.

One solution considered to brighten smiles and eliminate these tough stains, many people have considered a professional bleaching product.  For most patients, bleaching works particularly well for teeth that are yellowish in tone.  Teeth that are brownish in tone also tend to respond well to whitening solutions as well.  Grayish teeth are typically more difficult to brighten, but specially formulated whitening products can dramatically improve their appearance.  Essentially, no matter the degree of tooth discoloration, there are ways to at least make your teeth a little whiter and brighter.

Dental restorations on the front teeth such as bonding or tooth-colored fillings cannot be whitened with bleaching material.  The shade of these artificial materials won’t respond to bleaching.  However, they can be replaced to match the shade of your new, whiter smile.

While it is difficult to predict the final result of your teeth whitening treatment, there is a whitening option that is just right for you.  Fortunately, The Dental Center at Easton has the trained professionals that can determine which treatment will yield the best results.  Give us a call today to learn how you can get your teeth whiter.

Performance-Enhancing Athletic Mouthguards: Hype? Or the Real Deal?

Sep 28th, 2019
Easton Dentists Oct 1st, 2019

Sports related dental injuries are for real and they do account for some of our emergency care cases.  But now there is a trend towards high performance mouthguards.  It’s a baffling field full of contradictory claims that have left many experts scratching their heads.  Should you buy into the hype?

No longer are athletic mouthguards just something athletes wear to prevent them from visiting the emergency dentist (but, of course, that is why we advocate them!). New athletic mouthguards now actually claim to help athletes perform at their optimal levels.

Performance-enhancing athletic mouthguards seem to be a miracle of modern medicine – the right mouthguard can help the entire body can function at peak capacity. Athletes who invest in these custom mouthguards says they give them improved focus, balance, endurance, and strength. Pro athletes, in sports ranging from golf to boxing to football, have turned to these appliances for an edge over competitors.

Your basic athletic mouthguards are protective and distribute impact to reduce the severity or occurrence of injuries, such as mouth cuts, concussions, and tooth damage. Over-the-counter boil-and-bite varieties offer this protection at a minimal cost to the user. The new-and-improved varieties do this and more.

One type, with the Under Armor name on it makes states:

“ArmourBite® technology with patented Power Wedges™ to increase strength, improve endurance, and reduce athletic stress”

UA Performance Mouthwear mouthguards are intended to stop clenching, which is what triggers the body to overproduce stress hormones such as cortisol, which decreases strength and muscle growth. Cortisol is known to regulate the immune response, but chronic overproduction can have significant negative effects on the body.

Another marketer, NewAge Performance makes a claim:

“90 percent of the population has a bad or poor bite, which causes a mis-alignment in your body. When you have a perfect bite, the body reciprocates with better body alignment, allowing you to perform at a higher level. The New Age mouthpiece fools the body in thinking you have the perfect bite, hence the results being instant.”

It is is not yet known if they truly live up to the claims of physical benefits manufacturers want us to believe. Right now, we have to rely on the users – athletes – for our best information. For many of them, they believe it works.

Regardless if you are a believer or not, one of the most important things to come out of studies on the subject is that none of the mouthguards interfered with the athlete’s performance.  The key is, if the athlete believes in them, that will encourage them to always keep them in their mouth, and that is always a plus.

Is Dental Anxiety For Real?

Jun 16th, 2019
Easton Dentists Jul 5th, 2019

Believe it or not, there is an actual syndrome that is called Dental Anxiety.  Numerous studies have been performed on the topic.  One such study resulted in the following questionnaire, developed by J.H. Clarke and S. Rustvold, Oregon Health Sciences University School of Dentistry, 1993, and revised in 1998.  This scale helps dentists, especially emergency dentists, determine how to treat certain patients.

If you are anxious about visiting the dentist, please print out this form and rank your concerns or anxiety over the dental procedures listed below. Please fill in any additional concerns and bring to your appointment or your visit to your emergency dentist in Gahanna, Ohio.

Level of Concern or Anxiety

1. Sound or vibration of the drill:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

2. Not being numb enough:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

3. Dislike the numb feeling:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

4. Injection (“Novocain”):  Low Moderate High Don’t know

5. Probing to assess gum disease:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

6. The sound or feel of scraping  during teeth cleaning: Low Moderate High Don’t know

7. Gagging, for example during impressions  of the mouth: Low Moderate High Don’t know

8. X-rays:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

9. Rubber dam:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

10. Jaw gets tired: Low Moderate High Don’t know

11. Cold air hurts teeth: Low Moderate High Don’t know

12. Not enough information about procedures: Low Moderate High Don’t know

13. Root canal treatment:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

14. Extraction:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

15. Fear of being injured:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

16. Panic attacks:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

17. Not being able to stop the dentist: Low Moderate High Don’t know

18. Not feeling free to ask questions: Low Moderate High Don’t know

19. Not being listened to or taken seriously: Low Moderate High Don’t know

20. Being criticized, put down, or lectured to: Low Moderate High Don’t know

21. Smells in the dental office: Low Moderate High Don’t know

22. I am worried that I may need a lot of  dental treatment: Low Moderate High Don’t know

23. I am worried about the cost of the  dental treatment I may need: Low Moderate High Don’t know

24. I am worried about the number of appointments and the time that will be required for necessary appointments and treatment; time away from work, or the   need for childcare or transportation:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

25. I am embarrassed about the condition  of my mouth:  Low Moderate High Don’t know

26. I don’t like feeling confined or not in control: Low Moderate High Don’t know

Keep in mind that your emergency dentist in Columbus Ohio may or may not have time to use this tool. It is suggested that when you call for an appointment, that you notify staff at Easton Dental that you are concerned or experience dental anxiety. If you decide to take this assessment, be prepared to discuss with Dr. Gilmer to ensure the best possible care.