The First Dentist

Nov 5th, 2017
Easton Dentists Dec 5th, 2017

Dentistry has been practiced for at least 9,000 years and tooth extraction and remedies for toothaches have likely been around in some form for much longer. The first dentist whose name we know is Hesi-Re. He lived during the Third dynasty of Egypt sometime around 1600 B.C. In recovered documents, he is referred to as “Chief of Dentists and Physicians” and “Doctor of the Tooth.” He is recognized as the first person to discover periodontal disease.

Even before Hesi-Re, however, the practice of dentistry was well under way. The earliest evidence of dentistry has been found in present-day Pakistan. The evidence shows that members of the Indus River Valley Civilization cured dental issues with the use of bow drills. Essentially, the bow drill was the ancient, hand-powered antecedent of today’s dental drills. These drills predate the invention of anesthesia, which means treatment with them would have been very painful.

By about 4,500 B.C., fillings were being used. The oldest evidence of the use of dental fillings was found in present-day Slovenia and was found to be about 6,500 years old. It is possible that fillings of one sort or another were used before this time, but evidence has yet to be discovered. The filling that was found was made of beeswax and was packed into a tooth with a deep cavity. This beeswax filling was likely effective in reducing the pain and swelling that the cavity caused.

In the dark ages, advances in dentistry, as in many other fields, were lost. Dentistry was, for a time, no longer considered a unique practice and dental work was performed in large part by barbers and, sometimes, medical doctors. Barbers primarily focused on extracting teeth.

In 1723, modern dentistry was born with the publication of Pierre Fauchard’s The Surgeon Dentist: A Treatise on Teeth. This treatise offered a comprehensive approach to the care and treatment of teeth.

The dentists of today owe their knowledge to the innovators of 9,000 years ago and of yesterday, who did not settle with the status quo of dental care and who made today’s treatments possible. If you’re in need of today’s finest dental treatment, visit The Dental Center at Easton Town Center today.

Top Ten Dental Procedures Performed

Oct 29th, 2017
Easton Dentists Nov 6th, 2017

Dental health is intimately connected to full-body health. For this reason, it is absolutely vital that you visit your dentist regularly and get the dental treatments you need as soon as you need them. Ten of the most common dental treatments are explained below.

1. Braces
Braces correct the misalignment of teeth and bite-related problems by applying constant pressure to the teeth. Over time, this pressure acts to straighten the teeth and to correct bite issues. By correcting these issues with braces early, you can help to prevent more severe issues as you age.

2. Bonding
If you have a tooth that is decayed, cracked, chipped, or discolored, bonding may be the right treatment for you. Bonding can address all of these problems and is a fairly simple, non-invasive procedure. Essentially, a resin is painted over the affected tooth, and then firmly bonded to it with the use of a special hardening light.

3. Dental crowns
If you have a damaged or cracked tooth, a dental crown may be the right choice for you. The crown is placed over the visible part of the tooth above the gum line and can improve the appearance and strength of your damaged tooth.

4. Bridges
If you are missing one or more teeth, a bridge can be used to replace them. There are several different types of bridges that may be applied, but the most common is a fixed bridge.

5. Implants
Another possible solution for a missing tooth is an implant. These implants replace the missing tooth and are firmly held in place with a frame or metal post that is fixed into the jawbone

6. Fillings
If you are suffering from cavities, a filling can be used to restore your affected tooth where the cavity has compromised it.

7. Veneers
If you have decayed, chipped, or stained teeth, a strong, thin piece of resin or ceramic, known as a veneer, can be bonded to the tooth to refresh your smile.

8. Sealant
If your teeth are prone to decay, you may wish to have a sealant applied. Sealants bond to the teeth and form a protective coating over the enamel that acts as a barrier against the bacteria that cause tooth decay. Sealants are typically only used on the back teeth.

9. Root canals
If you are suffering from a diseased or abscessed tooth, you may require a root canal. During this procedure, the tooth is opened and cleaned to remove the infected tissue that is at its center.

10. Antibiotics
If your gums bleed when you brush your teeth, you may be suffering from gingivitis. Depending on the stage of the infection, a course of antibiotics may be the best option for restoring the health of your gums.
Only a dentist can determine what dental treatment is right for you. Visit The Dental Center at Easton to receive the care you need.

Most Commonly Asked Dental Questions

May 31st, 2017
Easton Dentists May 31st, 2017

Adults should visit the dentist twice a year irrespective of whether they have dental problems or not, the American Dental Association (ADA) explains. Additionally, you should start booking dental appointments for your baby once your baby’s first tooth erupts, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends. With that in mind, here are some of the most commonly asked dental questions:

How Do I Prevent Dental Problems?

You can easily prevent dental problems such as cavities, gingivitis and halitosis by eating healthy and observing good dental hygiene practices including flossing, brushing your teeth twice a day and visiting your dentist twice a year. Additionally, you should avoid chewing or smoking tobacco.

What Causes Tooth Sensitivity?

Tooth sensitivity or root sensitivity occurs when the enamel wears down, thereby exposing the dentin area of the tooth, which contains microscopic canals that connect to the dental nerves. The condition is typically characterized by dental discomfort or pain when cold, hot, sticky or acidic items touch the exposed nerves. Some of the things that could erode the crown and leave the dentin unprotected include acidic foods, aggressive brush, grinding teeth during sleep, tooth-whitening chemicals, excessive plaque, fractured/cracked teeth and orthodontics procedures. It is worth noting that most people will likely experience tooth sensitivity at some point in their lives because studies show that about four out of five people develop gum recession before reaching age 65. Gum recession exposes the dentin area.

How can I Change the Shape of My Teeth?

You can change the shape of your teeth using orthodontics techniques and devices including dental bonding, re-contouring, veneers and crowns. It is worth noting that orthodontics procedures typically vary in terms of cost, duration of the procedure, recovery time, and results. Because of this, you should consult an orthodontist before undergoing orthodontic treatment.

Conclusion

The three dental questions and answers discussed above can help you maintain good oral health.

The Why, When, How and Where of Tongue Scraping

Mar 3rd, 2017
Easton Dentists Mar 3rd, 2017

Imagine it’s still winter…not hard to do in Ohio since it changes so quickly… you’re standing at the door, ready to brave the cold. You’re layered-up with three shirts and a sweatshirt, your heavy winter coat, and two layers of socks underneath your waterproof winter boots. Then you’ve got those awesome jeans with the flannel on the inside, your comfy hat, scarf, and gloves. You’re set! But wait. As you step toward the door, you suddenly realize you have an itch … and it’s deep down … buried beneath all those layers. And, try as you may, every attempt to reach that bugger-of-an-itch fails. Defeated, you realize the only relief you’re ever gonna’ get is to remove each one of those layers. Where are we going with this?!

The Tongue

We’re going inside your mouth, of course, to your tongue – this is a dental article, after all! Because whether you know it or not, like you in the wintertime, your tongue is also “all covered up” – buried beneath layers of bacteria, fungi, and food residue that can inhibit your ability to taste, let alone cause your tongue to appear various shades of yellow, white, or green! Remove the bacteria, though, and your food will once again directly interact with those taste buds, and return to its natural hue. So how does one do that? With a tongue scraper, of course!

WHAT is a tongue scraper?

A tongue scraper is a U-shaped device designed to “scrape” the top layer of scum from your tongue. They have been in use since ancient times, and have been made of everything from wood to whalebone. Nowadays, they are made of more hygienic material, and come in a variety of shapes, sizes, designs and colors.

WHY use a tongue scraper?

The residue on your tongue includes things like the cavity-inducing Streptococcus mutans bacterium, fungi, rotting food (that’s not good), and what’s referred to as “volatile sulfur compounds.” In other words, sulfur – that “rotting egg smell.” Talk about ew! So, as you can see, there are several reasons why you’d want to get rid of this gunk in your mouth. Let’s tackle them one by one:

  • Reduce bad breath: ‘nuff said! We have had many patients thank us so much for this little tip because it dramatically improves their overall life! Get a little closer…
  • Reduce your risk of periodontal disease and cavities: Bad bacteria contribute to plaque and tartar on teeth, making them more susceptible to cavities. Bacteria build-up can also lead to inflammation of gum tissue (gingivitis). If left untreated, gingivitis can lead to periodontal disease, which means a more expensive dental visit (plus other unwanted consequences!). Speaking of avoiding an expensive dental visit, when was the last time you came in to see us? Come see us now if it’s been awhile, by calling in at 614-414-0111.
  • Make room for good bacteria: see our article here on probiotics for your mouth.
  • Prevent heart disease? While the debate is still up in the air, many studies suggest there could be a correlation between gum disease and heart disease.

HOW does one use a tongue scraper?

In general, make sure to rinse your tongue scraper before and after use. Apply the tongue scraper to the back of your tongue and drag it forward. Then, rinse and repeat. Make sure to get the sides of your tongue as well, not just the center!

Make sure not to press too hard or you can cause yourself to bleed. And, if you’re wondering if you should scrape your tongue while recovering from a dental procedure, that’s a good question … ask your dentist for the best advice particular to your situation. Still not sure how this thing really works? The next time you’re in ask Julie, Kate, or Lindsay for a quick tutorial!

WHERE do I buy one?

Your first choice is, believe it or not, us! We may even have a sample we could provide to you at no cost. Tongue scrapers are relatively inexpensive, and can also be found at any local drugstore. It doesn’t matter the material, color, or brand – just find the one you like and get scraping!

Energy Drinks and Your Child’s Teeth. Should You Worry?

Nov 14th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Energy Drink

The hard clack of cleats echo about as your “little” sports hero rushes to get out of the house … soon to be late for practice. Armed with all they’ll need for a day in the sun, their equipment bag is packed and slung awkwardly over one shoulder, bursting at the seams with untold numbers of pads and dirty gear. And after making a final beeline through the kitchen to raid your refrigerator of a 64oz bottle or two of rainbow-colored sustenance, they’re off for what will no doubt be another grueling practice session. You’re proud of your kids – they’re growing up. And yet you wonder as you stare at the door that just shut behind them. Are those techni-colored drinks they’re drinking every day hurting them?

The truth, unfortunately, is yes. While they may keep your children energized and awake for the next few hours, the bad news is, they’re secretly eating away at their teeth – and fast.

Why Are Energy Drinks Such a Threat to Teeth?

The crux of the problem is the double-whammy that comes from an exceedingly high sugar content and citric acid pH that can be as low as 2.9. Now, we understand pH can be a tricky thing to understand, so to help put that number in perspective, a bit, consider this: battery acid has a pH of 0.0 (so, a lower number means a higher acid content). Stomach acid (which we can imagine as being quite acidic, at least!) has a pH that fluctuates between 1.0 and 3.0.  A lemon, in contrast, comes in at around 2.0, a grapefruit at 3.0, and tomato juice at 4.0.

The real distinction though is in knowing that with each increase in numerical value, the acid intensity increases 10-fold. So, in the example above, a lemon ends up being 10 times more acidic than a grapefruit, and 100 times more acidic than tomato juice – a sensation you can certainly taste if you bite into one!  In contrast, milk and water have a pH of 7.0, so, it’s easy to see the difference in the numbers – they’re huge.

The Science

What all this means to your child’s teeth is the real question, though, and precisely what researchers at Southern Illinois University set out to discover in 2012.  The results, which surprised even the research team, showed considerable damage to tooth enamel after only five days of steady consumption. Five days.

To determine the effect of these drinks on our teeth, the research team looked at 22 popular sports and energy drinks, and exposed artificial tooth enamel to the beverages for 15 minutes at a time, four times daily. This schedule was chosen because it mirrors the consumption habits of many users who drink these beverages every few hours – a particularly common habit among those who consume sports drinks, particularly when your kids are involved in sports.  After each 15-minute exposure, the enamel was then placed into an artificial saliva solution for two hours to mimic what would happen once consumption stopped.  After only five days on this schedule, the enamel showed a 1.5% loss with sports drinks, and a shocking 3% loss with energy drinks.

We have seen to many patients in their younger years already suffering from extensive enamel loss. One case was especially heartbreaking because the patient thought they were doing a great job simply by staying away from soda. The result: it gave that patient more perceived  freedom to consume these sport drinks at a higher rate because they were “better” than soda.

The Critics

While critics in the beverage industry suggest the time used to expose the enamel to the drinks may have been excessive, it’s widely known that snacking, as well as regular sipping of any beverage other than water, creates acidic activity in the mouth that promotes tooth decay. Of course, adults also need to be careful, and if you’re the weekend warrior type, or are pulling shifts and consuming these beverages throughout the day, the time of exposure might actually not be long enough.  The sweet spot is in the middle-ground, and that’s basically the advice we’re going to offer today.

There is no doubt that these beverages are not good for our teeth. They’re also not good for our stomach, and esophagus if one is prone to acid reflux.

The Middle Ground — It’s about being Informed

We’re not asking you to force your kids to give up their sports beverages and energy drinks. However, it is wise to know the risks, and to understand how you can help your kids combat some of their side-effects. Here are two quick tips that will help if they can’t shake the habit:

  • Have them keep water nearby so they sip on it to dilute the acid covering their teeth. This also increases saliva production to help protect tooth enamel.
  • Suggest that they don’t brush immediately after consuming such beverages.  Why? Because in the thirty minutes to an hour after consumption, tooth enamel will be slightly softer, and brushing in this window of time literally ends up spreading the acid around to other parts of the teeth. Not good.  If brushing is desired, save it for an hour or so after.

Lastly, here is the breakdown of most caustic to least caustic drinks as found by the researchers. Remember, the lower the number, the more harmful to your teeth!

Sports Drinks:

  • Filtered Ionozed Alkaline H2O – pH: 10.0
  • Water – pH: 7.o
  • Odwalla Carrot juice – pH: 6.2
  • Odwalla Vanilla Monster – pH: 5.8
  • Unflavored Pedialyte – pH: 5.4
  • Vita coco – pH: 5.2
  • Aquafina,Dasani, Smart water – pH: 4.0
  • GU2O – pH: 4.29
  • Powerade – pH: 3.89
  • Accelerade – pH: 3.86
  • Gatorade Endurance – pH:  3.22
  • Monster – pH:  2.7

Energy Drinks:

  • Red Bull – pH: 3.3
  • AMP Energy – pH: 2.7
  • Monster Energy – pH: 2.7
  • Full Throttle  – pH: 1.45
  • Rock Star – pH: 1.5

P.S. Don’t forget the mouthguard!

Best Foods To Eat To Keep a Healthy Mouth

Oct 31st, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Best Foods To Eat To Keep a Healthy Mouth

food

Preventative health measures for a healthy mouth can start with your diet. Depending on the foods and snacks you eat can keep your teeth and gums healthy.

Calcium For Healthy Teeth

Two of the best products for healthy teeth are milk and cheese. While they both provide calcium, they provide additional benefits. The calcium in milk is absorbed faster because milk contains Vitamin D. Calcium-rich cheese destroys bacteria in your mouth.

Chewy Vegetables For Healthy Gums And Teeth

When you chew fresh vegetables, it will keep your teeth strong and your gums healthy. Carrots, onions, and celery provide important nutrition while keeping your mouth healthy. They reduce the bacteria in your mouth by increasing saliva. Carrots also contain beta-carotene for strong teeth.

Apples For A Healthy Mouth

When it comes to dental health, all fruits are not equal. You can have the healthiest mouth if you choose apples instead of citrus fruits. Citrus fruits are acidic, and can harm your tooth enamel.

Strawberries For White Teeth

You can eat strawberries for natural teeth whitening. With their nutritional benefits, strawberries can be an inexpensive alternative to over-the-counter whitening products.

Healthy Foods With Protein Contain Phosphorus

Some of the most common protein-rich foods provide phosphorus for healthy teeth. Eggs, fish, and meat contribute to strong, healthy tooth enamel.

Healthy Foods With Magnesium

Magnesium is also important for healthy tooth enamel. Some popular foods that are high in magnesium include bananas, spinach, and whole grains.

Shiitake Mushrooms For Dental Health

When you are looking for a different snack for yourself or your children, or want to add something special to a recipe, consider the dental health benefits of shiitake mushrooms. Not only will they destroy harmful bacteria in your mouth, they are a natural way to stop plaque from building up on your teeth. You will be less likely to develop cavities when you include the mushrooms in your diet.

 

Here at The Dental Center we recommend maintaining a balanced diet, and include some of these products every day. You can enjoy good nutrition, delicious food, and dental health.

For more information on preventative health measures and more information on some more of the best foods to eat to keep a healthy mouth, contact our Columbus office today and schedule your next cleaning!

 

 

The Perfect Road Map For Your Child’s Oral Health

Sep 15th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Kid Roadmap

On July 3rd, 1806, two years into their journey to chart the uncharted west of America, pioneer explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark reached a challenge of epic proportion – the Rocky Mountains. What next, they wondered? Without a map, they were forced to do what explorers do – explore, and hope for the best. So, that got us thinking. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a handy map you could use to chart your own dental health? With that in mind, and in honor of our explorers, we at The Dental Center at Easton wanted to share with you a few mile markers you can use to stay on top of your child’s health today, next year, and for years to come!

 

6 to 24 months

When you’re a new parent, life is a whirlwind, and the dental care of your newborn may not be top of mind when you look in their mouths and see no teeth! Here are some things to keep in mind:

Schedule your regular visit: As soon as that first tooth comes in, you’ll want to give us a call at (614) 414-0111 to schedule your regular visit so we can review your next steps and the steps for your child. Also, be aware the ADA recommends fluoridated toothpaste now for all children under the age of three. Don’t wait!

Ask us about:

  • Home hygiene basics: Things like, tips and tricks on brushing and other care. There’s nothing better than having our hygienists give brushing tutorials – they’re experts!
  • Preventative dentistry: The possible need for fluoride supplements
  • Dietary strategies: Achieving a balanced diet early in life for good oral health later
  • Feeding practice awareness: Bottle, breastfeeding, and no-spill training cups
  • Non-nutritive oral habits: Thumb sucking, pacifiers
  • Making Dental Visits Normal: Even from a young age, your child should be very comfortable visiting the dentists. He or she should build that regular habit while young to keep a strong sense of normalcy.

 

2 to 12 years old

Ah, the little ones are growing up. Teeth are coming in at all sorts of crazy angles, and you’re going crazy from the rise in obligations. Here’s a quick list of what to consider during this time frame:

  • Preventative dentistry: Pit and fissure sealants can do wonders for keeping your child’s dental bills down, and their teeth in their head until they’re ready to fall out naturally. Ask us about them. They’re affordable AND useful. And, super-fast, you’ll be in and out in no time.
  • Orthodontic Consultation: Visiting an orthodontist for an early consultation is best done around your child’s seventh birthday. With today’s technology, early intervention can reduce the cost and duration of braces when your child gets older.

 

The Teen Years

The years “everything” happens! As children start to come into their own, new habits and desires begin to unfold as well. You’ll have to address every imaginable concern during these years, from piercings, to calls for whitening, braces, and the need to refer yourself away from your pediatric dentist and to a general dentist for continuing oral care. So, speak with us about:

  • Cosmetic Dentistry: What solutions are advisable now, and what things should be avoided.
  • Teen social pressures: Smoking, alcohol, intraoral/perioral piercings and the like. Believe it or not, we can help a lot with this. Does your teen have a favorite Dental Center hygienist? We might be able to arrange for that person to help when your teen comes in so they can address these concerns with an intermediary they trust. Give us a call at (614) 414-0111 to see how we can help!
  • Orthodontics: Options for minimizing appearance and health problems later in life.
  • Home hygiene tips: Brushing, flossing, choosing the right mouthwash.
  • Craniofacial injury prevention: With your children’s possible participation in sports, you’ll want to get them a mouthguard. Hands down it’ll be one of your best investments in a healthy mouth. And we make great ones here at The Dental Center!
  • Positive Reinforcement: Your teen hears lots of feedback from every direction, but it can be very helpful to hear the benefits of good oral health from a different voice then they hear everything else. We will work hard to reinforce this necessary message with you to your teen!

Staying on top of your child’s oral health isn’t as hard as you think, and if you keep this schedule handy, you’ll be ahead of most of your neighbor’s kids when it comes to a healthy mouth and body. Come to think of it … why not share it with them as well? They’ll thank you for the help.

7 Oral Health Concerns for Those Over 50

Aug 4th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Oral Health Concerns

When they say “age is all in your head,” they’re probably right. But then, your teeth ARE in your head — so you likely can’t escape having to pay a little more attention to them after the age of 50. Although some oral health concerns are seen as common as we age, if you adopt a proactive mindset and educate yourself, these concerns do not have to be common for you. Anticipating and recognizing changes in your mouth can help you be on top of your health in this area — so let’s take a look at the main ones you have to watch out for.

Dry Mouth:

The most common oral health concern you’re likely to experience as you age is dry mouth. In the medical world, dry mouth goes by the name xerostomia, and can be brought on by a number of contributing factors, including the over-consumption of drying beverages like coffee and alcohol, as well as the frequent consumption of salty foods. Another big offender is the medication we take over a lifetime to treat various illness. And the list isn’t a short one – there are at least 400 medications that can contribute to xerostomia, including medications for high blood pressure and depression. We have been able to help many patients find relief and prevent them from greater harm.

Ill-fitting Dentures: 

First off, it’s important to note that the need for dentures is not a must as we age. Today, healthier living and better access to dental care has reduced the percentage of seniors wearing dentures to 27% from nearly 50% just a few decades ago. That said, should dentures be a part of your life, or that of a loved one, wearing properly-fitting dentures is critical. Sometimes, all that’s needed is a denture reline. Give us a call at (614) 414-0111 and we can see if that will help. Dentures that cause pain or shift in the mouth tend to alter a person’s eating habits, which can lead to nutrition deficits if healthy, but hard-to-chew, foods are avoided. Ill-fitting dentures can also cause thrush.

Physical Obstacles to Good Oral Care: 

As we age, we sometimes find ourselves having to contend with physical ailments that limit our desire to maintain good oral care. Arthritis, vision loss, or injuries are a few of the most common. To combat these concerns, using a floss pick to get between teeth can be helpful, and the regular use of oral rinses can assist in dislodging difficult-to-remove food debris, while adding to the overall health of one’s mouth and gum tissue. Here’s how to choose the best mouth rinse for your needs!

Naturally Receding Gums: 

The old expression “long in the tooth” isn’t just a quaint idiom about how one accumulates wisdom with age – it also refers to how our teeth appear to “lengthen” as we age. In other words, it’s a fancy way of saying our gums are receding. While some degree of gum recession is indeed natural as we get up in years, this predisposes us to cavities along the root structure of the tooth where enamel doesn’t exist. So, as one ages, flossing, brushing and rinses are more important than ever.

Gum Disease: 

Natural gum recession is one thing, and a part of “growing up,” if you will. Gum disease, however, is preventable. So, if it’s been longer than six months since you’ve seen us, please do give us a call at (614) 414-0111. Each of the above items in this list can contribute to gum disease, and good oral care can prevent it. Failing to do so can lead to a need for dentures at its most extreme, and pain and swollen gums at its least. We’d prefer you experience neither concern!

Tooth Loss: 

If a tooth is lost due to trauma or decay, and not replaced with an implant or other prosthetic, it can have serious complications for the health of the jawbone. Teeth can shift out of place and fall out, and bone tissue can be resorbed back into the body. Not a good thing.

Loss of Insurance Coverage:

Retirees without dental coverage can sometimes cover the expense of dental care on their own; sometimes they cannot. But a lack of funds to take care of one’s teeth can be devastating to the health of our mouths, and our overall health. So we need to plan for two things: a care routine that allows us to take care of our teeth as much as humanly possible and some sort of financial backup plan for when problems do arise.We help dozens of patients a week to discover what the plan that best fits their needs!

5 Drinks That Are Bad For Your Teeth

Jul 14th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

an assortment of drinks

 

 

 

 

 

 

Many people today track their food and liquid intake in an effort to lose weight and be healthier, but how many people actually consider how those same factors affect the health of their teeth? After all, the teeth are the first part of the body to come in contact with any food or beverage that you consume. Before a food can enter into your digestive system, it first has to pass through your mouth. So why not consider the implications that food and drinks have on your teeth?

If you’re wondering about foods that affect your oral health, check out this past article. Today, however, we’re going to look at the 5 worst drinks for your teeth. What makes a drink less than ideal for oral health are its sugar content, acidity level, and staining probabilities. Let’s take a look at the five worst offenders.

Coffee

Since so many people begin their day with a cup or more of coffee, you’re probably disappointed to see this on the list. It’s not the caffeine that makes this liquid an offender, rather the major issue with coffee is its staining power. The dark brown color of coffee is notorious for turning teeth yellow over time. If you’re someone who takes their coffee with cream and sugar, that doesn’t help either. Adding sugar to an already acidic drink only makes it worse for your teeth.

Tea

Much like coffee, the big problem with tea is its dark color. Black teas and other dark blends can cause the same staining issues as coffee, turning your pearly whites a shade of yellow. If you’re going to enjoy tea, try lighter blends to avoid staining your teeth and try not to add sugar so you don’t contribute to tooth decay and cavities.

Alcohol

Whether your beverage of choice is beer, wine, or liquor, it doesn’t really matter; all three are offenders for oral health. Beer is highly acidic, wine is acidic and stains teeth, and liquor is acidic and potentially too sugary when mixed with sodas or juices. No matter how you enjoy your alcohol, you’re going to expose your teeth to acid, sugar, or staining agents.

Soda

Soda is one of the worst offenders on the list because it combines high acidity, loads of sugar, and sometimes a dark color that causes staining all in one beverage. If you want to increase your risk of tooth decay, cavities, and yellowing teeth, simply continue drinking soda.

Energy & Sports Drinks

If you think that reaching for an energy drink or sports drink is a better option, think again. These beverages, whether in powder form or canned are just as bad as soda. High acidity and sugar levels harm your teeth and offer little benefit to your body in general.

You might be wondering what you’re supposed to drink to keep your teeth healthy. To be completely truthful, as boring as it sounds, water is your best option. Water is typically pH balanced for the body, meaning it isn’t too acidic or too alkaline, it does not contain any sugar, and its clear color means you won’t have to worry about staining.

We realize however that you are probably going to indulge in your favorite beverages from time to time. Here are a few tips that you can use to minimize the damage done to your teeth:

-Drink these beverages through a straw. This helps transport the liquid to the back of your mouth and avoids direct contact with your teeth.

-Sip water in between drinks of these beverages or follow up the beverage with a glass of water to wash away lingering acid and sugar.

-Brush and floss at least 2x a day to remove built up sugar and plaque that lead to tooth decay and cavities.

If you’ve already suffered the effects of consuming too many of these drinks, Easton Dentist is here to help correct any damage that’s been done. Whether you need professional teeth whitening, cavity repair, or simply a good cleaning, we can help you restore your healthy smile. Contact us today to set up an appointment!

Why Teeth Yellow and What You Can Do About It

Jun 24th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

One of the most common aesthetic complaints that patients have regarding their smile is the color of their teeth. We are used to seeing celebrities and TV actors with perfect, pearly white smiles and come to expect that our own smiles should look the same way. It makes sense then that patients feel frustrated by the yellowing of their teeth and wonder what they can do to fix it.

What Causes Teeth To Yellow

The truth is that we will all experience yellowing teeth as part of the natural aging process. Some people experience it more than others, but none the less, it’s not an uncommon condition. As we age, the outer protective layer of our teeth, the enamel, thins and becomes more translucent. The inner, living layer of our teeth, the dentin, also diminishes with time and has a tendency to yellow with age. Both the thinning of enamel and the shrinking and yellowing of the dentin are what cause teeth to appear yellow as we get older.

What You Can Do To Prevent Yellow Teeth

As we discussed above, there are two layers of the teeth: enamel and dentin. Your teeth’s enamel can become discolored and stained; this is called extrinsic discoloration, while intrinsic discoloration is related to aging dentin. Preventing yellow teeth needs to be addressed both extrinsically and intrinsically.

Addressing the discoloration of tooth enamel is fairly easy. Here are a few things you can do to prevent your enamel from becoming stained and yellow in color:

-Stop smoking

-Cut back or eliminate acidic and dark colored beverages (coffee, soda, wine, tea)

-Maintain a good oral health routine, including flossing to remove plaque build up

-Drink water after eating brightly colored fruits such as blueberries, blackberries, etc.

-Use OTC whitening products

Unfortunately, there is no treatment for correcting discoloration of dentin. This living tissue is prone to the aging process. You can, however, take steps to prevent premature aging. Here’s how:

-Treat bruxism (teeth grinding) which can cause your enamel and dentin to wear and age at an accelerated rate

-Protect teeth from trauma by wearing a mouth guard when playing sports

-Nourish your body with a healthy diet and manage stress

If you are concerned with the color of your teeth, have your dentist determine if the discoloration is intrinsic or extrinsic. There are many whitening solutions that can help address extrinsic discoloration and restore a brighter smile. In the case that your discoloration is caused by intrinsic factors, don’t despair. Take steps now to make sure it doesn’t become worse and that you aren’t doing anything to cause premature aging of your teeth.

Do you want to have a brighter and whiter smile? Contact Easton Dentists today and schedule a consultation to see how we can help you get the smile you deserve!