Why Are Implants Becoming More Popular?

Feb 25th, 2019
Easton Dentists Feb 27th, 2019

Almost everyday now you encounter advertising for dental implants. Why has implants taken the world of dentistry by storm?

Since their introduction into the market over thirty years ago, implants have zoomed ahead of more conventional tooth replacements to become the top choice among both implant dentists and patients. What makes these modern dental devices so popular?

Resemblance to natural teeth. Dental implants can more accurately emulate both the appearance and function of natural teeth. Just as teeth have two main components—the roots beneath the gum surface and the visible crown, implants have a similar in design. Implants have a root replacement by utilizing a titanium metal post that is embedded in the jawbone. Then a life-like porcelain crown or even another form of restoration is permanently attached.

Durability. Due to implant materials and unique designs, a long-term success rate are achieved after the ten year span in the 95-plus percentile. This longevity is primarily achieved due to the use of titanium as the primary metal in the implant post. Since bone has an affinity for titanium, it will successfully grow and adhere to the post over time, creating well-anchored hold. With proper maintenance and care implants, it is reasonable to expect them to last for decades, making them a wise, cost-effective decision on the consumers part.

Added stability for other restorations. While a good many people think of implants as a single tooth replacements, technological advancements have created a much broader reach. For instance, with a few strategically-placed implants a removable denture can be supported, giving this traditional restoration much more security and stability. Better yet, bone loss can be stopped, one of the main drawbacks of conventional dentures. Also, implants can support a fixed bridge, getting rid of the need to permanently alter adjacent teeth that are often used to support a conventional bridge.

With continuing dental advancements, implants are becoming increasingly useful restorative dental work. Depending on your individual tooth-loss case, you can ask your Easton cosmetic dentist if implants would be the smartest choice to put the form and function back in your smile for many years to come.

How Stress Affects Oral Health

Dec 21st, 2018
Easton Dentists Dec 21st, 2018

Most of our patients know a thing or two about stress. Whether you’re dealing with chronic stress, or a brief stressful life circumstance, we all encounter it from time to time. Most people associate stress with heart attacks or ulcers, but do you know how stress can affect your oral health?

Stress may negatively affect your oral health in indirect ways.

For starters, stress can cause folks to reach for coping strategies that aren’t so good for your teeth (or the rest of your body).

Junk food, sweets, cigarettes, or alcohol are just a few examples. When these substances interact with your teeth, they can do a lot of damage in the way of gum disease and tooth decay.

Secondly, when we are stressed, we tend to stop making positive health behaviors a priority. Let’s say you’re in the hospital after a car accident; your brushing and flossing routine will not be forefront on your mind.

Even a minor bout of stress from a tough day can have us reaching for our cozy bed and some relieve instead of taking the time to brush first.

And of course, keeping up with routine dental visits may fall completely off our priority list while under stress. This can prevent us from finding the early signs of decay and can cause more pain and stress later on.

How does stress affect our mouths directly?

Well, lots of folks grind their teeth as a physical way to deal with stress. You may be doing it without even realizing it! Ask a partner or someone who knows you well to tell you if you have this habit. Many of our patients benefit from wearing a mouth guard at night to protect against the damage of grinding their teeth. It protects wear and tear damage and alleviates muscle tension from the forces exerted when tightly clenching your jaw.

Also, when we are stressed we have higher levels of stress hormones, such as cortisol and adrenaline, that put our body in a “flight or fight” state. This causes our blood pressure and blood sugar to increase, and our digestive and immune function to decrease. When our immune system isn’t functioning as it should, this can make periodontal disease more likely. It can also slow down the healing of other oral issues or injuries we may have.

What can you do about it?

The best thing you can do to prevent the stress of oral health issues is to maintain good dental hygiene and visit us regularly for routine visits. We want what’s best for you — and that includes a healthy mouth for a lifetime! Schedule an appointment today!

Should I Brush Before Flossing?

Nov 16th, 2018
Easton Dentists Nov 16th, 2018

The age-old question – should you floss before you brush or after? If you asked any one of our team members, you just might get a different answer on this one!

Before you report them for not knowing their stuff, each response can be right! As long as you’re doing a thorough job, we don’t care when you floss!

The Case for Flossing Before Brushing

Theoretically, flossing first dislodges the gunk between your teeth, letting the fluoride in your toothpaste reach those crevices better.

Also, behavioral scientists say since most people don’t like to floss, it’s better to get the least-pleasant half of your dental routine out of the way first – you’ll be less likely to skip it. Once you have a minty, fresh mouth from brushing, you might be less inclined to feel the need to floss afterward.

The Case for Flossing After Brushing

Some say flossing last is better because it clears your mouth from extra food and debris that could otherwise be carried by the floss into the very spaces you’re trying to clean out.

Plus, it might be more pleasant to put those flossing hands into a clean mouth versus an unbrushed one.

Bottom Line

Floss when it works for you. But make it a habit! Choose the same time every day, floss once a day, and floss thoroughly.

And don’t forget to use the right flossing method: for each new set of teeth, use a new section of floss, and hug each side of the tooth by dragging the floss upward in the shape of a “C.”

Want us to show you how? Just ask!

How Apples are Good for Your Teeth

Oct 5th, 2018
Easton Dentists Oct 5th, 2018

Good for my teeth

People have been asserting that “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” since the 19 th century. While it may not necessarily be true that those who eat apples never have to see a doctor, apples certainly have great health benefits for our bodies! Did you know they can even be good for our teeth? Let’s take a look at what the research says …

It’s widely thought that chewing a crisp, fresh apple can help brush away plaque on our teeth. We’re not too sure on this one, as some studies show a higher plaque content on teeth after eating an apple. At the same time, there is evidence to suggest some polyphenols in apples can lower the ability of cavity-causing bacteria to adhere to teeth. Further, some studies have shown that the antioxidants in apples can help prevent periodontal disease.

Apples even contain a (very) small amount of fluoride. This is worth noting, as fluoride is so important in helping prevent cavities.

Lastly, the act of chewing an apple stimulates saliva production. Saliva helps wash away food debris and bacteria. Remember, though, apples contain sugar and acid so it’s best not to go overboard with them.

You can even swish with water after eating one to wash away some of the sugar left behind. As the science continues to look into how apples affect our teeth, one thing we know is true: regular dental visits, along with daily tooth brushing and flossing, is your best defense against tooth decay! Schedule an appointment today!

Effects of Soda on Your Teeth

Jul 23rd, 2018
Easton Dentists Jul 23rd, 2018

Ever seen those videos where someone puts a baby tooth in a glass of soda and watches it decay? Well, the effect of soda in an actual mouth is a bit different.

You have your saliva to help wash away the sugar, you eat other things throughout the day, and brush at least twice a day to remove debris or plaque. Nevertheless, soda is not something we recommend you consume more often than a once-in-awhile treat. Here’s why:

 

1. Sugar

Soda has an extremely high sugar content. The bacteria that cause tooth decay feed off of sugar and excrete acid, which is what causes tooth decay. The more sugar our teeth have to interact with, the more prone to decay they will be.

 

2. Acid

Think diet soda is a better alternative? Even though it contains zero sugar, it can still contain acids such as phosphoric acid or citric acid. Acid eats away at a tooth’s enamel and leaves it prone to decay.

 

3. Colors

Caramel color, Yellow 5, etc. Any type of artificial coloring can cause tooth-staining. If you prefer your teeth sparkling white, it’s best to stay away from soda.

 

Alternatives!

Instead of soda, we recommend spicing up your daily beverages with other alternatives. How about some sparkling water or plain water infused with fresh fruit?

When you do drink soda, make sure to rinse with water afterwards. And, as always, keep up with regular brushing and flossing to protect those precious teeth!

What to Do When You Crack a Tooth

May 21st, 2018
Easton Dentists May 21st, 2018

Ouch!

Chomp on something your tooth didn’t like? Or get hit in the mouth with a hockey puck?

If you think you may have a cracked tooth, or if you’re holding a piece of your tooth in your
hand, follow these steps!

1. Give us a call to schedule an appointment at 614-414-0111. Let us know about your emergency and we will make our best effort to see you right away! We always try to hold some appointments open for these occasions.

2. If there are tooth fragments that have fallen out, preserve them in a clean container with a moist solution (cold mik, water, saliva), and bring them in to your appointment.

3. Apply a cold pack to your jaw to lessen any pain and swelling.

4. If bleeding, bite down on a gauze pad or a moist tea bag until bleeding stops.

It is also possible to have a cracked tooth and not know it.

If you have any pain when biting down, or when eating something hot or cold, it’s best to get it checked out.

In order to prevent further damage to the tooth or an infection, it’s very important to correct a cracked tooth immediately. Don’t wait until the pain is unbearable. Let us help right away!

The History of the Tooth Fairy

Apr 21st, 2018
Easton Dentists May 1st, 2018

As a dentist, the tooth fairy is particularly close to my heart. She makes the potentially scary event of losing a baby tooth something to look forward to and she encourages good dental hygiene because, after all, no fairy wants to dirty tooth. Recently, I started wondering about the origins of this fairy. How did we begin to tell our children that if they put a tooth beneath their pillow, a fairy would come in the night and take it in exchange for a tooth?

As it turns out, the tooth fairy is a relatively new addition to the folklore of childhood, but the ritualistic disposal of a child’s lost tooth has a long, interesting history. In some cultures, teeth were buried, burned, thrown over a house, or placed near a mouse hole. Over time, the role of the mouse in the disposal of baby teeth grew and, even today, Spanish children leave their teeth for a little rat to take.

In a French story called La Bonne Petite Souris, a good mouse rescues a queen by knocking out the evil king’s teeth. This good mouse then turns out to be a fairy. So, the tooth mouse has become a tooth fairy. It wasn’t until after World War II, however, that the tooth fairy became a part of most American children’s childhoods. This may be thanks, in part, to Tinkerbell and Cinderella, who made fairies a big part of the childhoods of children in the 1950s.

Today, the tooth fairy is an important part of many children’s childhoods. It can also be a great tool for parents who need to encourage better dental hygiene in their children. Just be sure to let them know the tooth fairy likes pearly white teeth!

How Often Should You See the Dentist

Jan 29th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 29th, 2018

We love our patients, so we’d be more than happy to see you every day! Alas, we realize that’s not really possible to visit Easton in Columbus, OH everyday, so here are some more realistic guidelines for making appointments.

In general, it all depends on your oral health status and your health history.

For most patients, the optimal frequency to visit the dentist is twice a year. In six months,
enough tartar and plaque can build up to require a dental check-up and cleaning, especially if your dental hygiene isn’t as rigorous as it should be.

For others with gum disease, a genetic predisposition for plaque build-up or cavities, or a
weakened immune system, you’ll need to visit more frequently for optimal care.

Depending on where you fall in those categories, we will prescribe the necessary frequency to keep your optimal health.

It’s important to keep your routine visits with us so that:
• We can check for problems that you might not see or feel.
• We can find early signs of decay (decay doesn’t become visible or cause pain until it reaches more advanced stages).
• We can treat any other oral health problems found (generally, the earlier a problem is found, the more manageable it is).

There you have it! Those are the brass tacks for how often you should schedule an appointment.

Remember, we offer a variety of different hours to make it the most convenient for you!  Mondays and Wednesdays we are here for late appointments, Tuesday and Fridays we start really early, and of course we have lunchtime appointments everyday! If you need to schedule, you can do that request an appointment now!

But if it is not time for your next appointment, don’t let it keep you from stopping in and saying hi whenever you’re in the neighborhood! We are really close to Gahanna, New Albany, Westerville, and all those Easton neighborhoods!  We love seeing your smile!

The First Dentist

Nov 5th, 2017
Easton Dentists Dec 5th, 2017

Dentistry has been practiced for at least 9,000 years and tooth extraction and remedies for toothaches have likely been around in some form for much longer. The first dentist whose name we know is Hesi-Re. He lived during the Third dynasty of Egypt sometime around 1600 B.C. In recovered documents, he is referred to as “Chief of Dentists and Physicians” and “Doctor of the Tooth.” He is recognized as the first person to discover periodontal disease.

Even before Hesi-Re, however, the practice of dentistry was well under way. The earliest evidence of dentistry has been found in present-day Pakistan. The evidence shows that members of the Indus River Valley Civilization cured dental issues with the use of bow drills. Essentially, the bow drill was the ancient, hand-powered antecedent of today’s dental drills. These drills predate the invention of anesthesia, which means treatment with them would have been very painful.

By about 4,500 B.C., fillings were being used. The oldest evidence of the use of dental fillings was found in present-day Slovenia and was found to be about 6,500 years old. It is possible that fillings of one sort or another were used before this time, but evidence has yet to be discovered. The filling that was found was made of beeswax and was packed into a tooth with a deep cavity. This beeswax filling was likely effective in reducing the pain and swelling that the cavity caused.

In the dark ages, advances in dentistry, as in many other fields, were lost. Dentistry was, for a time, no longer considered a unique practice and dental work was performed in large part by barbers and, sometimes, medical doctors. Barbers primarily focused on extracting teeth.

In 1723, modern dentistry was born with the publication of Pierre Fauchard’s The Surgeon Dentist: A Treatise on Teeth. This treatise offered a comprehensive approach to the care and treatment of teeth.

The dentists of today owe their knowledge to the innovators of 9,000 years ago and of yesterday, who did not settle with the status quo of dental care and who made today’s treatments possible. If you’re in need of today’s finest dental treatment, visit The Dental Center at Easton Town Center today.

Top Ten Dental Procedures Performed

Oct 29th, 2017
Easton Dentists Nov 6th, 2017

Dental health is intimately connected to full-body health. For this reason, it is absolutely vital that you visit your dentist regularly and get the dental treatments you need as soon as you need them. Ten of the most common dental treatments are explained below.

1. Braces
Braces correct the misalignment of teeth and bite-related problems by applying constant pressure to the teeth. Over time, this pressure acts to straighten the teeth and to correct bite issues. By correcting these issues with braces early, you can help to prevent more severe issues as you age.

2. Bonding
If you have a tooth that is decayed, cracked, chipped, or discolored, bonding may be the right treatment for you. Bonding can address all of these problems and is a fairly simple, non-invasive procedure. Essentially, a resin is painted over the affected tooth, and then firmly bonded to it with the use of a special hardening light.

3. Dental crowns
If you have a damaged or cracked tooth, a dental crown may be the right choice for you. The crown is placed over the visible part of the tooth above the gum line and can improve the appearance and strength of your damaged tooth.

4. Bridges
If you are missing one or more teeth, a bridge can be used to replace them. There are several different types of bridges that may be applied, but the most common is a fixed bridge.

5. Implants
Another possible solution for a missing tooth is an implant. These implants replace the missing tooth and are firmly held in place with a frame or metal post that is fixed into the jawbone

6. Fillings
If you are suffering from cavities, a filling can be used to restore your affected tooth where the cavity has compromised it.

7. Veneers
If you have decayed, chipped, or stained teeth, a strong, thin piece of resin or ceramic, known as a veneer, can be bonded to the tooth to refresh your smile.

8. Sealant
If your teeth are prone to decay, you may wish to have a sealant applied. Sealants bond to the teeth and form a protective coating over the enamel that acts as a barrier against the bacteria that cause tooth decay. Sealants are typically only used on the back teeth.

9. Root canals
If you are suffering from a diseased or abscessed tooth, you may require a root canal. During this procedure, the tooth is opened and cleaned to remove the infected tissue that is at its center.

10. Antibiotics
If your gums bleed when you brush your teeth, you may be suffering from gingivitis. Depending on the stage of the infection, a course of antibiotics may be the best option for restoring the health of your gums.
Only a dentist can determine what dental treatment is right for you. Visit The Dental Center at Easton to receive the care you need.