Everything You Need To Know About Lumineers

Apr 18th, 2019
Easton Dentists May 6th, 2019

Should you find yourself having misaligned, worn down, discolored or chipped teeth, Lumineers might be the solution you’re looking for. Dental Lumineers , made of a tooth-colored composite,  provide a shell that covers the tooth. Being extremely thin and white, these shells imitate the appearance of enamel and do an awesome job of adding to a bright smile. Carefully designed to fit the shape of your tooth exactly, a Lumineer corrects any chips, gaps, or tooth defects that detract from your smile. They are an excellent choice to whiten teeth that have become discolored or stained over the years. As hard as it may be to believe, these shells can last up to 20 years.

Want to know more about the procedure?

The application of Lumineers usually takes two visits to be completed. On the first visit, we will  consult with you to give you a full understanding of what you’re hoping to get accomplished. As your Columbus cosmetic dentist, we want to ensure that you feel 100% satisfied with your new smile! We listen closely to our patients’ concerns and educate them on their options. During this first visit, an impression is made of your teeth. This impression, along with any other necessary information gathered during your visit, gets sent to a lab where they craft the shells.

After several weeks, you will be notified that your Lumineers have arrived from the laboratory and we will schedule your next appointment. During this visit, the fit will be verified, and once the dentist is satisfied that all is well, he will lightly etch the contours of your teeth so that the Lumineers can be applied. The next step is to bond the lumineers to your teeth, thus completing the process.

Benefits of Getting Lumineers:

  1. A solution to chipped, cracked, or stained teeth! A fantastic smile can often add to self-confidence.
  2. Compared to other options, minimal tooth etching and reshaping is required in order to place Lumineers.  The procedure is significantly less complicated, and it ensures that your visit will be a comfortable experience.
  3. Lumineers are durable. They are difficult to crack or chip, and typically last several decades! And should they need to be redone or removed, the process is not difficult, since they don’t require any tooth-reshaping in order to be placed.

Call Easton Dental TODAY, if you feel this may be the solution you are looking for!

How Stress Affects Oral Health

Dec 21st, 2018
Easton Dentists Dec 21st, 2018

Most of our patients know a thing or two about stress. Whether you’re dealing with chronic stress, or a brief stressful life circumstance, we all encounter it from time to time. Most people associate stress with heart attacks or ulcers, but do you know how stress can affect your oral health?

Stress may negatively affect your oral health in indirect ways.

For starters, stress can cause folks to reach for coping strategies that aren’t so good for your teeth (or the rest of your body).

Junk food, sweets, cigarettes, or alcohol are just a few examples. When these substances interact with your teeth, they can do a lot of damage in the way of gum disease and tooth decay.

Secondly, when we are stressed, we tend to stop making positive health behaviors a priority. Let’s say you’re in the hospital after a car accident; your brushing and flossing routine will not be forefront on your mind.

Even a minor bout of stress from a tough day can have us reaching for our cozy bed and some relieve instead of taking the time to brush first.

And of course, keeping up with routine dental visits may fall completely off our priority list while under stress. This can prevent us from finding the early signs of decay and can cause more pain and stress later on.

How does stress affect our mouths directly?

Well, lots of folks grind their teeth as a physical way to deal with stress. You may be doing it without even realizing it! Ask a partner or someone who knows you well to tell you if you have this habit. Many of our patients benefit from wearing a mouth guard at night to protect against the damage of grinding their teeth. It protects wear and tear damage and alleviates muscle tension from the forces exerted when tightly clenching your jaw.

Also, when we are stressed we have higher levels of stress hormones, such as cortisol and adrenaline, that put our body in a “flight or fight” state. This causes our blood pressure and blood sugar to increase, and our digestive and immune function to decrease. When our immune system isn’t functioning as it should, this can make periodontal disease more likely. It can also slow down the healing of other oral issues or injuries we may have.

What can you do about it?

The best thing you can do to prevent the stress of oral health issues is to maintain good dental hygiene and visit us regularly for routine visits. We want what’s best for you — and that includes a healthy mouth for a lifetime! Schedule an appointment today!

Is It True That Gum Disease Can Cause Heart Attacks?

Nov 26th, 2018
Easton Dentists Nov 26th, 2018

Gum disease is a bacterial infection that can affect more than just oral health. There are many studies showing that people with gum disease also have significantly high rates of developing cardiovascular problems, such as heart attack or stroke. While scientists continue to research the theory, it has been recognized that there is a strong relationship between gum disease and heart attacks.

Heart attacks are considered the most common medical condition in the general population. It is also known that heart attacks are the leading cause of death in the United States. On the other hand, many researchers have found that gum disease affects nearly half of American adults over the age of 30. Because the two conditions similarly affect the population, the idea that gum disease links to heart attacks is prevalent. During a study that was conducted in 2012, known as PAROKRANK, researchers evaluated a group of dental patients to back up the theory. The results showed that 43% of heart attack patients also suffered from gum disease. They also found that people with gum disease had a 50% higher chance of a heart attack than those without.

When it comes to the link between gum disease and heart attacks, inflammation caused by bacteria may be the culprit. It is understood that the common factor between gum disease and heart attacks include the same type of bacterial infection. The bacteria found in gum disease produces inflammation in other areas of the mouth when left untreated. By continuing to live with this condition, the bacteria can eventually spread to other parts of the body. Infection caused by gum disease can easily enter the bloodstream through everyday activities, such as brushing, flossing, and chewing food. As the bacteria spreads throughout the body, it can eventually reach the circulatory system, causing blood vessels to swell and increasing the risk of blood clots and heart attack. Because inflammation is the body’s instant response mechanism, the inflammation can cause the formation of plaque. It is known that the existence of excess plaque can cause the clogging of arteries, similar to how it causes tooth decay.

With the proper care and consistent follow-up with your dentists, the possible health risks of gum disease can be avoided. Everyday care is essential to keeping the signs of gum disease at bay. Continuing to correctly brush and floss each day as well as avoiding alcohol and tobacco can prevent gum disease from forming. Regular cleanings and dental visits can also help with early diagnosis of gum disease. During dental appointments, your dentist can evaluate and measure the gums for inflammation, build-up, and possible bone loss.

The bottom line is that prevention and treatment of gum disease can ultimately save our bodies from further health conditions, such as heart attacks. That is why it’s important to contact your dentist if you suffer from any of the related symptoms:

* Red, swollen, tender gums

* Bleeding gums after brushing, flossing, or eating

* Receding gums

* Loose or separating teeth

* Pus surrounding the gums

* Mouth sores

* Bad bread

* A change in bite

Gum disease has been debated as a possible cause of heart attacks for many years. While research continues to be conducted on the direct link, it’s best to take the proactive steps to beat the possibility

Electrical or Manual Toothbrush: Which is Better?

Oct 26th, 2018
Easton Dentists Oct 26th, 2018

This is one of our most frequently asked questions! Our answer? It’s not the brush that matters, it’s who’s doing the brushing.

Let’s break that down. The goal of tooth brushing is to remove plaque from your teeth on a consistent (daily!) basis, so that we prevent the buildup of tartar which leads to tooth decay. A manual toothbrush is a great and inexpensive tool that helps us do just that. Make sure to brush two minutes per day, twice a day. Gently brush ALL surfaces and make sure to reach those back molars.

For some people, it can be difficult to brush properly with a manual toothbrush. Those with some form of motor disability or arthritis may benefit from using an electric toothbrush. An electric brush can also be helpful for kids or anyone with braces.
The same tooth brushing rules apply – two times per day, two minutes at a time. One advantage of an electric toothbrush is that some have a built-in timer. If you’re one of those quick brushers who has a hard time making it to two minutes, consider using a timed electric brush.

At your next dental visit, ask us whether we think you would do better with a manual or electric brush! And, as always, don’t forget to floss!

Effects of Soda on Your Teeth

Jul 23rd, 2018
Easton Dentists Jul 23rd, 2018

Ever seen those videos where someone puts a baby tooth in a glass of soda and watches it decay? Well, the effect of soda in an actual mouth is a bit different.

You have your saliva to help wash away the sugar, you eat other things throughout the day, and brush at least twice a day to remove debris or plaque. Nevertheless, soda is not something we recommend you consume more often than a once-in-awhile treat. Here’s why:

 

1. Sugar

Soda has an extremely high sugar content. The bacteria that cause tooth decay feed off of sugar and excrete acid, which is what causes tooth decay. The more sugar our teeth have to interact with, the more prone to decay they will be.

 

2. Acid

Think diet soda is a better alternative? Even though it contains zero sugar, it can still contain acids such as phosphoric acid or citric acid. Acid eats away at a tooth’s enamel and leaves it prone to decay.

 

3. Colors

Caramel color, Yellow 5, etc. Any type of artificial coloring can cause tooth-staining. If you prefer your teeth sparkling white, it’s best to stay away from soda.

 

Alternatives!

Instead of soda, we recommend spicing up your daily beverages with other alternatives. How about some sparkling water or plain water infused with fresh fruit?

When you do drink soda, make sure to rinse with water afterwards. And, as always, keep up with regular brushing and flossing to protect those precious teeth!

Causes of Sensitive Teeth

Jun 9th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jul 9th, 2018

There’s nothing better on a hot summer’s day than a scoop of nice, cold ice cream. That is, unless you suffer from sensitive teeth. If you do, eating cold foods like ice cream can cause you a lot of pain. There are many causes of sensitive teeth. Below, we’ve outlined a few of the most common ones.

1. Brushing your teeth too hard

It may come as a surprise that you could be brushing your teeth too intensely. After all, we tend to think that the harder we brush, the cleaner our teeth. In actuality, however, brushing your teeth too hard can wear away the protective layers of your teeth. Over time, this will expose the tiny hollow tubes that lead to your dental nerves. Once this happens, you’ll likely experience sensitivity to extreme temperatures as well as acidic and sticky foods. Luckily, switching to a softer tooth brush and treating your teeth more gently can go a long way toward preventing increased sensitivity.

2. Grinding your teeth

Grinding your teeth causes sensitivity similarly to how brushing your teeth too hard causes sensitivity: you wear away the protective layers of your teeth until your nerves are easily triggered. If you suspect you grind your teeth, you should see a dentist right away. A mouth guard can help to prevent further damage.

3. Receding Gums

If your gums are receding, the sensitive roots of your teeth with be exposed. As a result, you’ll experience severe sensitivity. Receding gums can be caused by gum disease and grow more common with age. If you believe your gums are receding, you should see your dentist right away. He or she will develop a treatment plan to cure your gum disease and may also perform a procedure to seal your teeth.

If you’re suffering from sensitive teeth, be sure to mention it to your dentist. There may be fairly simple steps you can take to decrease your current sensitivity and to prevent further sensitivity in the future.

What to Do When You Crack a Tooth

May 21st, 2018
Easton Dentists May 21st, 2018

Ouch!

Chomp on something your tooth didn’t like? Or get hit in the mouth with a hockey puck?

If you think you may have a cracked tooth, or if you’re holding a piece of your tooth in your
hand, follow these steps!

1. Give us a call to schedule an appointment at 614-414-0111. Let us know about your emergency and we will make our best effort to see you right away! We always try to hold some appointments open for these occasions.

2. If there are tooth fragments that have fallen out, preserve them in a clean container with a moist solution (cold mik, water, saliva), and bring them in to your appointment.

3. Apply a cold pack to your jaw to lessen any pain and swelling.

4. If bleeding, bite down on a gauze pad or a moist tea bag until bleeding stops.

It is also possible to have a cracked tooth and not know it.

If you have any pain when biting down, or when eating something hot or cold, it’s best to get it checked out.

In order to prevent further damage to the tooth or an infection, it’s very important to correct a cracked tooth immediately. Don’t wait until the pain is unbearable. Let us help right away!

Foods That Cause Tooth Decay

Apr 11th, 2018
Easton Dentists Apr 11th, 2018

When it comes to tooth decay, it’s important to know the main culprit – acid. Acid is what eats away at our enamel and causes cavities.

Acid can enter our mouths in one of two ways: either directly through what we eat (citrus fruits, for example), or as a byproduct when oral bacteria consume the sugars that we eat.

Ultimately, a simple way to identify foods that cause tooth decay is to ask whether it’s acidic or sweet/starchy.

Acidic foods include things like citrus fruits, tomatoes, vinegar, kombucha and sour candy.

Sweet/starchy foods include things like candy, soda or sugar-sweetened beverages, fruit, bread,cereal, pasta and crackers.

The longer these things interact with your teeth, the greater the chance for tooth decay to occur. For example, sipping on soda throughout the day, or chewing a gooey caramel treat, increases the amount of sugar that coat your teeth. Bacteria love to feast on this sugar, creating an acidic environment and putting your teeth at risk for decay.

To help protect your teeth against tooth decay:
– Reduce your consumption of sweets and refined starches
– Enjoy acidic foods in moderation or as part of a meal
– Decrease or eliminate your consumption of soda or sugar-sweetened beverages
– Swish with water after meals and snacks
– Maintain good oral hygiene to brush away plaque buildup (floss at least once a day and brush twice a day)

And, as always, make sure to visit us regularly so we can remove tartar buildup and assess for early signs of decay!

Make an APPOINTMENT today!

Reasons You May Have A Dry Mouth

Jan 29th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 29th, 2018

We all know drinking enough water is good for our health. And when you’re feeling parched, there’s nothing better than a tall drink of ice-cold water to dampen that dry mouth of yours.

But what do you do when you find yourself constantly needing to wet your whistle?

There are numerous reasons you could be suffering from dry mouth. Below are the top five.

Physiologic
Sometimes having a dry mouth is just a normal part of life. Temporary anxiety, open-mouthed
breathing, mild dehydration, menopause, pregnancy, and decreased saliva due to sleep are all
normal causes of dry mouth.

Prescription medication
Sixty-three percent of the top 200 most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S. are known to cause dry mouth. And the higher the number of medications a person takes, the higher the chance of dry mouth. That’s why as we age, we tend to experience more instances of dry mouth. It’s not necessarily age-related, but our consumption of medication may cause this side effect.

Habitual use of alcohol and tobacco
Use of any of these products will dry out the oral cavity.
Please drink in moderation, and make sure to up your water intake when you imbibe. As for tobacco, we always recommend quitting as soon as possible.

Chronic Disease
Diabetes, Sjogren’s disease, Sarcoidosis, Hepatitic C can all cause dry mouth.

Psychogenic or Idiopathic
When symptoms are present without an identifiable cause (idiopathic), or because of psychological causes (psychogenic), they can be difficult to diagnose.

If you find yourself with a persistent, unidentifiable case of dry mouth, you should make an appointment. Call us at 614-414-0111 or request an appointment online.

Figuring out which one is causing your dry mouth is so important because a dry mouth has a big effect on your dental health. Saliva is so important for swishing away bacteria.

The dryer the mouth, the more prone you are to cavities, bad breath, and gingivitis. We recommend visiting us at 4030 Easton Station, Suite 250, Columbus, OH 43219 or your doctor for a consultation on why you may be experiencing a dry mouth.

How Often Should You See the Dentist

Jan 29th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 29th, 2018

We love our patients, so we’d be more than happy to see you every day! Alas, we realize that’s not really possible to visit Easton in Columbus, OH everyday, so here are some more realistic guidelines for making appointments.

In general, it all depends on your oral health status and your health history.

For most patients, the optimal frequency to visit the dentist is twice a year. In six months,
enough tartar and plaque can build up to require a dental check-up and cleaning, especially if your dental hygiene isn’t as rigorous as it should be.

For others with gum disease, a genetic predisposition for plaque build-up or cavities, or a
weakened immune system, you’ll need to visit more frequently for optimal care.

Depending on where you fall in those categories, we will prescribe the necessary frequency to keep your optimal health.

It’s important to keep your routine visits with us so that:
• We can check for problems that you might not see or feel.
• We can find early signs of decay (decay doesn’t become visible or cause pain until it reaches more advanced stages).
• We can treat any other oral health problems found (generally, the earlier a problem is found, the more manageable it is).

There you have it! Those are the brass tacks for how often you should schedule an appointment.

Remember, we offer a variety of different hours to make it the most convenient for you!  Mondays and Wednesdays we are here for late appointments, Tuesday and Fridays we start really early, and of course we have lunchtime appointments everyday! If you need to schedule, you can do that request an appointment now!

But if it is not time for your next appointment, don’t let it keep you from stopping in and saying hi whenever you’re in the neighborhood! We are really close to Gahanna, New Albany, Westerville, and all those Easton neighborhoods!  We love seeing your smile!