Should I Brush Before Flossing?

Nov 16th, 2018
Easton Dentists Nov 16th, 2018

The age-old question – should you floss before you brush or after? If you asked any one of our team members, you just might get a different answer on this one!

Before you report them for not knowing their stuff, each response can be right! As long as you’re doing a thorough job, we don’t care when you floss!

The Case for Flossing Before Brushing

Theoretically, flossing first dislodges the gunk between your teeth, letting the fluoride in your toothpaste reach those crevices better.

Also, behavioral scientists say since most people don’t like to floss, it’s better to get the least-pleasant half of your dental routine out of the way first – you’ll be less likely to skip it. Once you have a minty, fresh mouth from brushing, you might be less inclined to feel the need to floss afterward.

The Case for Flossing After Brushing

Some say flossing last is better because it clears your mouth from extra food and debris that could otherwise be carried by the floss into the very spaces you’re trying to clean out.

Plus, it might be more pleasant to put those flossing hands into a clean mouth versus an unbrushed one.

Bottom Line

Floss when it works for you. But make it a habit! Choose the same time every day, floss once a day, and floss thoroughly.

And don’t forget to use the right flossing method: for each new set of teeth, use a new section of floss, and hug each side of the tooth by dragging the floss upward in the shape of a “C.”

Want us to show you how? Just ask!

How Apples are Good for Your Teeth

Oct 5th, 2018
Easton Dentists Oct 5th, 2018

Good for my teeth

People have been asserting that “an apple a day keeps the doctor away” since the 19 th century. While it may not necessarily be true that those who eat apples never have to see a doctor, apples certainly have great health benefits for our bodies! Did you know they can even be good for our teeth? Let’s take a look at what the research says …

It’s widely thought that chewing a crisp, fresh apple can help brush away plaque on our teeth. We’re not too sure on this one, as some studies show a higher plaque content on teeth after eating an apple. At the same time, there is evidence to suggest some polyphenols in apples can lower the ability of cavity-causing bacteria to adhere to teeth. Further, some studies have shown that the antioxidants in apples can help prevent periodontal disease.

Apples even contain a (very) small amount of fluoride. This is worth noting, as fluoride is so important in helping prevent cavities.

Lastly, the act of chewing an apple stimulates saliva production. Saliva helps wash away food debris and bacteria. Remember, though, apples contain sugar and acid so it’s best not to go overboard with them.

You can even swish with water after eating one to wash away some of the sugar left behind. As the science continues to look into how apples affect our teeth, one thing we know is true: regular dental visits, along with daily tooth brushing and flossing, is your best defense against tooth decay! Schedule an appointment today!

Effects of Soda on Your Teeth

Jul 23rd, 2018
Easton Dentists Jul 23rd, 2018

Ever seen those videos where someone puts a baby tooth in a glass of soda and watches it decay? Well, the effect of soda in an actual mouth is a bit different.

You have your saliva to help wash away the sugar, you eat other things throughout the day, and brush at least twice a day to remove debris or plaque. Nevertheless, soda is not something we recommend you consume more often than a once-in-awhile treat. Here’s why:

 

1. Sugar

Soda has an extremely high sugar content. The bacteria that cause tooth decay feed off of sugar and excrete acid, which is what causes tooth decay. The more sugar our teeth have to interact with, the more prone to decay they will be.

 

2. Acid

Think diet soda is a better alternative? Even though it contains zero sugar, it can still contain acids such as phosphoric acid or citric acid. Acid eats away at a tooth’s enamel and leaves it prone to decay.

 

3. Colors

Caramel color, Yellow 5, etc. Any type of artificial coloring can cause tooth-staining. If you prefer your teeth sparkling white, it’s best to stay away from soda.

 

Alternatives!

Instead of soda, we recommend spicing up your daily beverages with other alternatives. How about some sparkling water or plain water infused with fresh fruit?

When you do drink soda, make sure to rinse with water afterwards. And, as always, keep up with regular brushing and flossing to protect those precious teeth!

What to Expect When Getting Your Wisdom Teeth Removed

Jul 9th, 2018
Easton Dentists Sep 4th, 2018

Wisdom teeth removal has become common in the dental field. It is mostly a preventive surgical procedure as wisdom teeth have been known to cause problems if left unremoved. Most people have their wisdom teeth removed as teenagers or young adults. If you need your wisdom teeth removed, go to the dental center and consult with an oral maxillofacial surgeon. After the procedure, you will need to rest up and give yourself time to recover. Below are what to expect during and after a wisdom teeth removal procedure.

1. Local Anesthetic

During the procedure, the dentist will need to use a local anesthetic. You won’t be conscious for the surgery. Have a friend drive you to the dental center as you won’t be able to drive yourself back home.

2. Recovery Time

After the procedure, the area swelling up is a natural reaction. The swelling will subside after 24 hours. Place a cold compact on the swollen area and keep your head up to control the swelling.

3. Rest Up

You will need a decent amount of time to recover from a wisdom teeth removal procedure. The Columbus dentist will give you a subscription for pain medication. Ensure you also rest up to speed up the healing process.

4. Soft Foods

For you to recover fast, make sure you stick to soft foods. Avoid eating anything that will aggregate the healing area. The foods you eat should not be too hot as this will slow down the healing process. Stick to warm soup dishes and foods that do not require chewing.

5. Brushing your Teeth

Even though keeping your mouth clean is good practice, refrain from brushing your teeth as this might undo your stitches. You should not even use mouthwash. You can use gauze to wipe your mouth, making sure not to make contact with the stitches.

Conclusion

Wisdom teeth removal is a preventive procedure that is recommended for everyone. In case your wisdom teeth cause damage to your jaws or other teeth, make an appointment at the dentist center and have them removed.

Root Canal Therapy: Nipping The Pain In The Bud

Jul 4th, 2018
Easton Dentists Sep 4th, 2018

Nothing comes close in terms of pain than a good old fashioned toothache. And while most of us devour pain killers -and sometimes even morphine- to lull the pain to sleep, a toothache always comes back, stronger, more unbearable than ever before. However, treating the root cause of the problem -and I mean that literally- is a surefire way to get rid of the pain for good, and that’s where root canal procedures come in. You may have heard about it before in passing, but what really is this miracle called root canal treatment after all.

Also known as endodontic therapy, root canal treatment is a dental procedure for eliminating infections from inside the tooth so as to prevent future infection. So, why root canal you may ask? Well, the pulp -the part of a tooth containing nerve tissue and blood vessels- is also referred to as the root canal.

A Few Fact About Root Canal Therapy

* The primary purpose of root canal therapy is to end the pain for good! Which is why it is used to eliminate the nerves located in the pulp -root canals- of the tooth. For your own information, nerves being the source of all bodily sensations, removing them has the obvious effect of making your gums and teeth insensitive to pain.

* Make no mistake about it, it’s a relatively painful pain relieving treatment. However, the flip-side to that is it’s a once off procedure that leaves you with a pain free root canal.

The stages in the dental procedure are pretty straightforward perhaps even a toddler can do better than a regular Columbus Dentist at The Dental Center.

It all starts with the cleaning of the root canal while your under anesthesia. The root canal is decontaminated and filled with dental cement, after which a crown is added to reinforce the brittle and fragile tooth.

 

Causes of Sensitive Teeth

Jun 9th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jul 9th, 2018

There’s nothing better on a hot summer’s day than a scoop of nice, cold ice cream. That is, unless you suffer from sensitive teeth. If you do, eating cold foods like ice cream can cause you a lot of pain. There are many causes of sensitive teeth. Below, we’ve outlined a few of the most common ones.

1. Brushing your teeth too hard

It may come as a surprise that you could be brushing your teeth too intensely. After all, we tend to think that the harder we brush, the cleaner our teeth. In actuality, however, brushing your teeth too hard can wear away the protective layers of your teeth. Over time, this will expose the tiny hollow tubes that lead to your dental nerves. Once this happens, you’ll likely experience sensitivity to extreme temperatures as well as acidic and sticky foods. Luckily, switching to a softer tooth brush and treating your teeth more gently can go a long way toward preventing increased sensitivity.

2. Grinding your teeth

Grinding your teeth causes sensitivity similarly to how brushing your teeth too hard causes sensitivity: you wear away the protective layers of your teeth until your nerves are easily triggered. If you suspect you grind your teeth, you should see a dentist right away. A mouth guard can help to prevent further damage.

3. Receding Gums

If your gums are receding, the sensitive roots of your teeth with be exposed. As a result, you’ll experience severe sensitivity. Receding gums can be caused by gum disease and grow more common with age. If you believe your gums are receding, you should see your dentist right away. He or she will develop a treatment plan to cure your gum disease and may also perform a procedure to seal your teeth.

If you’re suffering from sensitive teeth, be sure to mention it to your dentist. There may be fairly simple steps you can take to decrease your current sensitivity and to prevent further sensitivity in the future.

How to Detect a Cavity

Apr 21st, 2018
Easton Dentists May 1st, 2018

It is important to have your cavities treated as soon as possible to prevent further deterioration. During your regular checkups, your dentist will alert you to any cavities that he or she sees. Between checkups, however, it is important for you to pay attention to signs of cavities. Below, we’ve outlined a few key symptoms to watch out for.

1. Bad Breath or Bad Taste

If your breath seems to have gotten much worse recently and the scent isn’t going away, even when you brush your teeth and tongue regularly, you could have a cavity. Bad breath is sometimes a sign of cavities because the bacteria that causes cavities can also cause bad breath. In addition to bad breath, this bacteria can also cause a bad taste in your mouth that no amount of mouthwash can rinse away.

2. Tooth Pain

This is usually the most obvious symptom of a cavity. The decay of your tooth that is caused by cavities can lead to serious pain. If you experience any tooth pain, see your dentist right away, because this could mean your cavity has been left untreated for a long time.

3. Dark Spots and Holes

If your cavity is left untreated for a long time, you will be able to see it. It may appear as a dark spot on your tooth or as a hole you can see or feel with your tongue. If you can see or feel your cavity, you need to visit your dentist right away.

4. Pus

This is the most serious symptom of a cavity as it means that you have an abscess. Abscesses are serious medical issues that can cause fevers, pain, and swollen glands. If there’s any possibility you have an abscess, see your dentist right away so you can get the antibiotics you need to kill the bacteria.

If you have any of the symptoms we mentioned above, see your dentist as soon as you can. The best way to keep a cavity from becoming something more serious is to treat it early. If you believe you may have an abscess, call us immediately to schedule an emergency visit.

Foods That Cause Tooth Decay

Apr 11th, 2018
Easton Dentists Apr 11th, 2018

When it comes to tooth decay, it’s important to know the main culprit – acid. Acid is what eats away at our enamel and causes cavities.

Acid can enter our mouths in one of two ways: either directly through what we eat (citrus fruits, for example), or as a byproduct when oral bacteria consume the sugars that we eat.

Ultimately, a simple way to identify foods that cause tooth decay is to ask whether it’s acidic or sweet/starchy.

Acidic foods include things like citrus fruits, tomatoes, vinegar, kombucha and sour candy.

Sweet/starchy foods include things like candy, soda or sugar-sweetened beverages, fruit, bread,cereal, pasta and crackers.

The longer these things interact with your teeth, the greater the chance for tooth decay to occur. For example, sipping on soda throughout the day, or chewing a gooey caramel treat, increases the amount of sugar that coat your teeth. Bacteria love to feast on this sugar, creating an acidic environment and putting your teeth at risk for decay.

To help protect your teeth against tooth decay:
– Reduce your consumption of sweets and refined starches
– Enjoy acidic foods in moderation or as part of a meal
– Decrease or eliminate your consumption of soda or sugar-sweetened beverages
– Swish with water after meals and snacks
– Maintain good oral hygiene to brush away plaque buildup (floss at least once a day and brush twice a day)

And, as always, make sure to visit us regularly so we can remove tartar buildup and assess for early signs of decay!

Make an APPOINTMENT today!

Prevent Enamel Loss

Jan 30th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 30th, 2018

Enamel is the hard outer layer of your teeth that protects them from wear and tear and prevents them from feeling the temperature extremes of the foods and beverages you eat and drink. If you lose your enamel, your teeth will grow more sensitive and more prone to cavities. There is no way to replace lost enamel, but there are several precautions you can take to prevent enamel loss. By following the tips below, you’ll help to keep your smile healthy for years to come.

1. Avoid acid

By limiting your intake of acidic foods, you can help to prevent enamel erosion. Common acidic culprits include soda and other fizzy drinks, citrus fruits, and juices. When you do choose to consume these acidic items, try to keep them from settling on your teeth. Using a straw or rinsing your mouth with water as you eat or drink can help to keep the acid from eroding your enamel.

2. Be gentle

Brushing your teeth too firmly can lead to enamel erosion. Instead, try to brush gently with a soft toothbrush. You should also wait at least an hour after eating before you brush your teeth. Brushing too soon after a meal can increase your enamel erosion.

3. Assess your overall health

A number of medical conditions can cause enamel erosion. For example, alcoholism, bulimia, and GERD have all been found to result in enamel erosion. This is because each of these conditions causes acid to come into contact with your teeth. If you suffer from any of these conditions, see your doctor immediately.

4. Talk to your dentist

Your dentist can assess the current state of your enamel loss and can help you to develop a plan to prevent further erosion.

Protecting your enamel is an important aspect of maintaining your dental health. Once enamel has been lost, it cannot be replaced. With this in mind, be sure to take all of the precautions you can to prevent enamel erosion.

Reasons You May Have A Dry Mouth

Jan 29th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 29th, 2018

We all know drinking enough water is good for our health. And when you’re feeling parched, there’s nothing better than a tall drink of ice-cold water to dampen that dry mouth of yours.

But what do you do when you find yourself constantly needing to wet your whistle?

There are numerous reasons you could be suffering from dry mouth. Below are the top five.

Physiologic
Sometimes having a dry mouth is just a normal part of life. Temporary anxiety, open-mouthed
breathing, mild dehydration, menopause, pregnancy, and decreased saliva due to sleep are all
normal causes of dry mouth.

Prescription medication
Sixty-three percent of the top 200 most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S. are known to cause dry mouth. And the higher the number of medications a person takes, the higher the chance of dry mouth. That’s why as we age, we tend to experience more instances of dry mouth. It’s not necessarily age-related, but our consumption of medication may cause this side effect.

Habitual use of alcohol and tobacco
Use of any of these products will dry out the oral cavity.
Please drink in moderation, and make sure to up your water intake when you imbibe. As for tobacco, we always recommend quitting as soon as possible.

Chronic Disease
Diabetes, Sjogren’s disease, Sarcoidosis, Hepatitic C can all cause dry mouth.

Psychogenic or Idiopathic
When symptoms are present without an identifiable cause (idiopathic), or because of psychological causes (psychogenic), they can be difficult to diagnose.

If you find yourself with a persistent, unidentifiable case of dry mouth, you should make an appointment. Call us at 614-414-0111 or request an appointment online.

Figuring out which one is causing your dry mouth is so important because a dry mouth has a big effect on your dental health. Saliva is so important for swishing away bacteria.

The dryer the mouth, the more prone you are to cavities, bad breath, and gingivitis. We recommend visiting us at 4030 Easton Station, Suite 250, Columbus, OH 43219 or your doctor for a consultation on why you may be experiencing a dry mouth.