Tips on How to Get Rid of Bad Breath

Aug 9th, 2019
Easton Dentists Aug 30th, 2019

Bad breath, also known in the dental world as halitosis, is a condition that affects everyone at some point in their life. Thankfully, no matter how many first impressions may have been ruined with bad breath, we will share with you a few simple steps to drastically reduce halitosis, if not completely eliminate it.

Symptoms

You know that you have bad breath if you can clear a large room with a hearty “hello.” Before this happens, you can check your breath by cupping your hand over your mouth and nose and exhaling from the back of your throat, where most bad breath originates. If this exhale causes you to lose a offends yourself, then it’s time to do something about it, before it offends your family and friends. Before we find a solution, let’s learn more about halitosis.

Causes

There can be multiple causes for Halitosis, which is no surprise to anyone who’s been on the receiving end of morning breath after it’s mixed with a cup of coffee!

For most people, morning is often the time most people experience bad breath. When the flow of saliva nearly stops while we sleep, a buildup of bacteria in the mouth can be the end result. Brushing away the bacteria in the morning is helpful. brushing your tongue can works wonders also!

Certain foods can make our mouths smell. Think onions! Some foods, like garlic, are absorbed into our blood stream and exhaled through our lungs. All the toothpaste in the world can’t cover this smell. Engaging in some activity to make yourself sweat might help speed along the process.
When your body burns fat, ketones are produced which are released through your breath. These ketones usually have an sticky sweet odor. Staying hydrated and making smart dieting choices will help avoid the ketac smell.

Treatment

The best thing you can do to prevent halitosis is to practice good oral hygiene. This includes flossing and brushing your teeth and tongue. Paying clear attention to the very back of the tongue can help eliminate some of the more stubborn bacteria which may be hiding out there. It’s also important to take note of what foods give you the worst breath. Hopefully the combination of all of these tips will help prevent your bad breath.

Should you have any other questions about oral hygiene, don’t be afraid to bring them up the next time you visit our dental center in Columbus Ohio – The Dental Center at Easton.

Electrical or Manual Toothbrush: Which is Better?

Oct 26th, 2018
Easton Dentists Oct 26th, 2018

This is one of our most frequently asked questions! Our answer? It’s not the brush that matters, it’s who’s doing the brushing.

Let’s break that down. The goal of tooth brushing is to remove plaque from your teeth on a consistent (daily!) basis, so that we prevent the buildup of tartar which leads to tooth decay. A manual toothbrush is a great and inexpensive tool that helps us do just that. Make sure to brush two minutes per day, twice a day. Gently brush ALL surfaces and make sure to reach those back molars.

For some people, it can be difficult to brush properly with a manual toothbrush. Those with some form of motor disability or arthritis may benefit from using an electric toothbrush. An electric brush can also be helpful for kids or anyone with braces.
The same tooth brushing rules apply – two times per day, two minutes at a time. One advantage of an electric toothbrush is that some have a built-in timer. If you’re one of those quick brushers who has a hard time making it to two minutes, consider using a timed electric brush.

At your next dental visit, ask us whether we think you would do better with a manual or electric brush! And, as always, don’t forget to floss!

How Does Smoking Impact Dental Health?

Oct 11th, 2018
Easton Dentists Nov 12th, 2018

The use of tobacco products is the leading preventable cause of disease and early death in the United States.

Smoking has been linked to a myriad of dental health problems. The most well-known are bad breath and tooth discoloration. On a more serious note, smoking can be linked to a higher risk of gum disease, loss of bone mass in the jaw, and oral cancer.

And yet, approximately 42 million Americans still smoke cigarettes!

Every year, the American Cancer Society’s celebrates the Annual Great American Smokeout – one day each year that is set aside to encourage people to make the pledge to quit smoking.  Easton Dental strongly encourages people to quit smoking and thus promote better dental health. Why?

Because…

A person that smokes has twice the risk for gum disease as a non-smoker. The American Academy of Periodontology makes the assertion that the use of tobacco is one of the greatest risk factors in both the origin and progression of gum disease.

Not only does smoking increase likelihood of gum disease, but has also been discovered to make the treatment of gum disease not as effective.

A list of serious health conditions due to tobacco use includes heart attack, stroke, diabetes, osteoporosis, arthritis, Alzheimer’s, and cancer.  Gum disease has been found to also be a leading cause of tooth loss, along with being linked to complications during pregnancy.  At least 75% of cancers of the mouth, lips, tongue and throat are found in people that use an excessive amount of tobacco.

But all is not lost. It has been found that the effects of smoking begin to reverse themselves almost immediately once a smoker quits this harmful habit.  According to the American Dental Association, even after many years of heavy tobacco use, reducing the amount a person smokes or quitting all together is very beneficial.  This action can greatly reduce the health risks, even so far as reducing the likelihood of gum disease to the point as if that person had never smoked!

A life without the cigarettes can lead to: Better breath, whiter teeth, healthier gums, and overall better health. Who would not want that?

How to Detect a Cavity

Apr 21st, 2018
Easton Dentists May 1st, 2018

It is important to have your cavities treated as soon as possible to prevent further deterioration. During your regular checkups, your dentist will alert you to any cavities that he or she sees. Between checkups, however, it is important for you to pay attention to signs of cavities. Below, we’ve outlined a few key symptoms to watch out for.

1. Bad Breath or Bad Taste

If your breath seems to have gotten much worse recently and the scent isn’t going away, even when you brush your teeth and tongue regularly, you could have a cavity. Bad breath is sometimes a sign of cavities because the bacteria that causes cavities can also cause bad breath. In addition to bad breath, this bacteria can also cause a bad taste in your mouth that no amount of mouthwash can rinse away.

2. Tooth Pain

This is usually the most obvious symptom of a cavity. The decay of your tooth that is caused by cavities can lead to serious pain. If you experience any tooth pain, see your dentist right away, because this could mean your cavity has been left untreated for a long time.

3. Dark Spots and Holes

If your cavity is left untreated for a long time, you will be able to see it. It may appear as a dark spot on your tooth or as a hole you can see or feel with your tongue. If you can see or feel your cavity, you need to visit your dentist right away.

4. Pus

This is the most serious symptom of a cavity as it means that you have an abscess. Abscesses are serious medical issues that can cause fevers, pain, and swollen glands. If there’s any possibility you have an abscess, see your dentist right away so you can get the antibiotics you need to kill the bacteria.

If you have any of the symptoms we mentioned above, see your dentist as soon as you can. The best way to keep a cavity from becoming something more serious is to treat it early. If you believe you may have an abscess, call us immediately to schedule an emergency visit.

Reasons You May Have A Dry Mouth

Jan 29th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 29th, 2018

We all know drinking enough water is good for our health. And when you’re feeling parched, there’s nothing better than a tall drink of ice-cold water to dampen that dry mouth of yours.

But what do you do when you find yourself constantly needing to wet your whistle?

There are numerous reasons you could be suffering from dry mouth. Below are the top five.

Physiologic
Sometimes having a dry mouth is just a normal part of life. Temporary anxiety, open-mouthed
breathing, mild dehydration, menopause, pregnancy, and decreased saliva due to sleep are all
normal causes of dry mouth.

Prescription medication
Sixty-three percent of the top 200 most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S. are known to cause dry mouth. And the higher the number of medications a person takes, the higher the chance of dry mouth. That’s why as we age, we tend to experience more instances of dry mouth. It’s not necessarily age-related, but our consumption of medication may cause this side effect.

Habitual use of alcohol and tobacco
Use of any of these products will dry out the oral cavity.
Please drink in moderation, and make sure to up your water intake when you imbibe. As for tobacco, we always recommend quitting as soon as possible.

Chronic Disease
Diabetes, Sjogren’s disease, Sarcoidosis, Hepatitic C can all cause dry mouth.

Psychogenic or Idiopathic
When symptoms are present without an identifiable cause (idiopathic), or because of psychological causes (psychogenic), they can be difficult to diagnose.

If you find yourself with a persistent, unidentifiable case of dry mouth, you should make an appointment. Call us at 614-414-0111 or request an appointment online.

Figuring out which one is causing your dry mouth is so important because a dry mouth has a big effect on your dental health. Saliva is so important for swishing away bacteria.

The dryer the mouth, the more prone you are to cavities, bad breath, and gingivitis. We recommend visiting us at 4030 Easton Station, Suite 250, Columbus, OH 43219 or your doctor for a consultation on why you may be experiencing a dry mouth.

The Why, When, How and Where of Tongue Scraping

Mar 3rd, 2017
Easton Dentists Mar 3rd, 2017

Imagine it’s still winter…not hard to do in Ohio since it changes so quickly… you’re standing at the door, ready to brave the cold. You’re layered-up with three shirts and a sweatshirt, your heavy winter coat, and two layers of socks underneath your waterproof winter boots. Then you’ve got those awesome jeans with the flannel on the inside, your comfy hat, scarf, and gloves. You’re set! But wait. As you step toward the door, you suddenly realize you have an itch … and it’s deep down … buried beneath all those layers. And, try as you may, every attempt to reach that bugger-of-an-itch fails. Defeated, you realize the only relief you’re ever gonna’ get is to remove each one of those layers. Where are we going with this?!

The Tongue

We’re going inside your mouth, of course, to your tongue – this is a dental article, after all! Because whether you know it or not, like you in the wintertime, your tongue is also “all covered up” – buried beneath layers of bacteria, fungi, and food residue that can inhibit your ability to taste, let alone cause your tongue to appear various shades of yellow, white, or green! Remove the bacteria, though, and your food will once again directly interact with those taste buds, and return to its natural hue. So how does one do that? With a tongue scraper, of course!

WHAT is a tongue scraper?

A tongue scraper is a U-shaped device designed to “scrape” the top layer of scum from your tongue. They have been in use since ancient times, and have been made of everything from wood to whalebone. Nowadays, they are made of more hygienic material, and come in a variety of shapes, sizes, designs and colors.

WHY use a tongue scraper?

The residue on your tongue includes things like the cavity-inducing Streptococcus mutans bacterium, fungi, rotting food (that’s not good), and what’s referred to as “volatile sulfur compounds.” In other words, sulfur – that “rotting egg smell.” Talk about ew! So, as you can see, there are several reasons why you’d want to get rid of this gunk in your mouth. Let’s tackle them one by one:

  • Reduce bad breath: ‘nuff said! We have had many patients thank us so much for this little tip because it dramatically improves their overall life! Get a little closer…
  • Reduce your risk of periodontal disease and cavities: Bad bacteria contribute to plaque and tartar on teeth, making them more susceptible to cavities. Bacteria build-up can also lead to inflammation of gum tissue (gingivitis). If left untreated, gingivitis can lead to periodontal disease, which means a more expensive dental visit (plus other unwanted consequences!). Speaking of avoiding an expensive dental visit, when was the last time you came in to see us? Come see us now if it’s been awhile, by calling in at 614-414-0111.
  • Make room for good bacteria: see our article here on probiotics for your mouth.
  • Prevent heart disease? While the debate is still up in the air, many studies suggest there could be a correlation between gum disease and heart disease.

HOW does one use a tongue scraper?

In general, make sure to rinse your tongue scraper before and after use. Apply the tongue scraper to the back of your tongue and drag it forward. Then, rinse and repeat. Make sure to get the sides of your tongue as well, not just the center!

Make sure not to press too hard or you can cause yourself to bleed. And, if you’re wondering if you should scrape your tongue while recovering from a dental procedure, that’s a good question … ask your dentist for the best advice particular to your situation. Still not sure how this thing really works? The next time you’re in ask Julie, Kate, or Lindsay for a quick tutorial!

WHERE do I buy one?

Your first choice is, believe it or not, us! We may even have a sample we could provide to you at no cost. Tongue scrapers are relatively inexpensive, and can also be found at any local drugstore. It doesn’t matter the material, color, or brand – just find the one you like and get scraping!

What’s Up with All that Poking at My Gums During Cleaning?

Feb 22nd, 2017
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Poking on my gums

Have you ever wondered why your hygienist starts rattling off a series of numbers in the middle of your cleaning? 2, 2, 3, 2, 4, 5! What’s going on there? What your hygienist is doing is checking the depth of gum tissue pockets that surround your tooth. It’s a proactive way to identify your risk for gum disease, and when done regularly, can help catch it early. Dental probing is a pretty interesting exercise in dentistry, can save you from surgery and extractions, and here’s why.

Dental Probing Catches Problems Early

One reason to visit the dentist regularly is to identify problems in your mouth that you are completely oblivious to. Subtle changes in the health of our gum tissue can be missed by the naked eye, and some people – even those who visit a dentist regularly – can be prone to an excess buildup of plaque and tartar that can result in gingivitis and periodontal disease. Thankfully, your dental team can catch these changes early through the use of X-rays and the practice of dental probing.

The reason for probing is straightforward. As periodontal disease progresses, the visible markers of the disease (plaque and tartar) migrate down along the side of the tooth into the natural “pocket” between the ridge of the gumline and the tooth’s enamel. This inflames the gum tissue and widens this naturally slim gap between the tooth and gum. As this gap becomes wider, even more bacteria are allowed access to the sensitive tissue fibers along the root’s outer surface, causing more damage. This process may result in bone loss, and the need to extract a tooth. This is why probing is so important. We regularly have new patients come see us that have good looking teeth, but they have ignored gum care for so long that they lose those good teeth because the bone can no longer support the teeth. We want to prevent that from happening!

How Does Dental Probing Work?

“Probing” is quite simple and is accomplished by using a dental “probe” to measure the depth of a tooth’s pocket. The probe acts like a ruler, and has markings along its side measured out in millimeters. To measure the depth of your tooth’s pocket, your hygienist gently places the probe into this pocket and makes note of the depth. Those numbers you hear are the millimeter depths of your pocket. Six measurements are taken per tooth, three along the outside, and three along the inside of each tooth. A depth of three millimeters or under without any bleeding is generally accepted as healthy. Above that number, we will suggest more thorough gum therapy, including scaling and root planing, or something even more comprehensive if the number is above a five and nearing ten. We are so committed to setting you up right, that we set aside extra time to make sure you understand your treatment!

So, as you can see, maintaining pocket health is critical, and proper brushing and flossing can help clear away plaque and prevent the tartar buildup that expands a pocket. Your dentist also plays a critical role in ensuring you’re staying ahead of gum disease, so be sure to keep your regular appointments – particularly if you have been identified as having periodontitis (gum disease) and recommended for more frequent, thorough gum therapy. With a good routine and frequent visits to the dentist the only numbers you’ll be hearing moving forward should be 1, 2 and 3! Keep up the good work.

Halitosis Stinks: Try These Bad Breath Remedies

Dec 21st, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Halitosis, also known more commonly as bad breath, is an embarrassing problem nobody wants to admit they have. Studies have shown you are not alone, about 25-30% of the population throughout the entire world has the same problem as you. However, there are plenty of bad breath cures out there so that you don’t have to feel ashamed any longer. With these bad breath remedies, you can have fresh breath all day long:

Bacteria Build-Up

In most cases, halitosis is caused by harmful bacteria inside the mouth. The odor-causing bacteria loves to hide at the back of your tongue where ordinary brushing won’t reach. One of the best bad breath remedies is using a tongue scraper every time you brush your teeth is an ideal way to get rid of noxious bacteria. If you don’t already, you should be brushing your teeth at least twice a day, more preferably after every meal. Also, be sure and consider your diet. Bad bacteria thrive on white sugar and white flour products, while fresh vegetables and fruit will improve your health overall and your breath.

Got Water?

The more dehydrated you are, the worse your breath smells as your mouth needs saliva to stay fresh. Make sure you are drinking the recommended amount of water for your body size and an additional bonus, keeping your mouth moist and wet will flush any left behind food particles, which is what bad bacteria thrive on.

Got Gum?

Chewing sugar-free gum after meals helps stimulate the flow of saliva, which helps clean away any remaining food particles, and leaves your mouth constantly hydrated and smelling sweet.

Your Stomach Can Make Your Breath Stinky

While they may not seem related, stomach issues are another cause of bad breath. Acid reflux is a prime offender by causing a bitter, metallic taste and creating bad breath. If you have sour or bitter breath, you should schedule a checkup with your family doctor.  If you have these health issues, treating them is essential to curing your bad breath as it gets to the source rather than just masking the symptoms.

See a dentist!

Finally, if bad breath persists even after making these changes and implementing these suggestions, one should see their dentist. Your dentist will check for more serious conditions that could be causing the problem and recommend a treatment plan tailored to you.

Having a healthy mouth is the most important factor in having fresh breath. At The Dental Center at Easton, we understand that even though bad breath can be embarrassing, it is completely treatable. Contact The Dental Center today to schedule your exam.

Common Dental Problems Dentists Face

Sep 4th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

Every day, Dentists face some common dental problems, some more common than others. At first, some of these problems may not be serious. If ignored and not addressed, eventually, they can lead to serious problems.

Here are some of the problems that dentists face daily:

Bad Breath

Bad breath, also technically known as Halitosis, is a common dental problem that many individuals have. Bad breath can be caused by dry mouth, cavities, gum disease, bacteria on the tongue, and even oral cancers.

Even though a majority of individuals use mouthwash to stop bad breath, mouthwash may just be masking the underlying problem. In rare cases, there may be a serious concern that needs to be addressed.

Cavities

There are different forms of tooth decay, but the most common form of decay that dentists face are cavities.

Cavities occur when a sticky and hard substance called Plaque produce acids that erode the tooth enamel. Plaque is formed by a combination of bacteria, sugar and starches. Depending on how advanced the cavity has spread, in most cases, a filling would be a proper procedure to fix a cavity. However, in more serious cases, a root canal would be the proper course of treatment.

Preventing cavities and tooth decay is relatively easy: brush your teeth at least twice a day, floss daily, go to your regular checkups and eat healthy by avoiding foods that are heavy in starches and sugars.

Gum Disease

Gingivitis and Periodontitis are infections of the gums and the soft tissue of the mouth. These infections are also one of the main causes of all tooth decay among adults.

On the surface, these infections may not be serious, but gum disease is strongly linked to heart disease and stroke.

To prevent gum diseases, it is critical to brush at least twice a day and floss.

 

Unattractive Smile

Although unattractive smiles are not considered a medical dental problem, they may be considered a problem to people who are unhappy with their smile. Unattractive smiles are a reason why individuals seek treatment to correct these problems.

A smile is important to an individual’s self-esteem. Fortunately, with advancements and techniques in dental sciences, virtually everyone can have a smile that they can be happy with. Through teeth whitening, dental implants, dental bridges, dental partials, or any other cosmetic work, your dentist can achieve your perfect smile.
If you believe that you have any of these common dental problems, it is highly advised that you see a dentist. Although these minor dental problems may not seem serious at first, as time progresses, these could become severe.

At The Dental Center at Easton Town Center, Dr. Glimer, an experienced board certified dentist, deeply cares and understands your dental concerns. Our staff wants you to know that we are highly trained and that we pride ourselves on providing the best care and attention you need to keep your smile healthy. If you believe you have any concerns above or questions regarding your oral health, make an appointment with us today!

The Benefits Of Flossing

May 26th, 2016
Easton Dentists Mar 1st, 2017

When you visit the dentist, there’s one dental care question you’re sure to be asked; “Are you flossing?” Many patients sheepishly admit they’re falling short while others fib and ensure their hygienist that they floss religiously. The truth is, your dental hygienist will most likely be able to tell if you are being honest about your flossing habits or not.

Many individuals are guilty of skipping out on flossing. As your oral health expert, we don’t want you to feel guilty; we want you to understand the benefits of flossing so that you will take up the habit out of your own free will. Being informed of how flossing helps your oral health is the first step in wanting to start the practice.

So what exactly are the benefits of flossing? Let’s look at the main and most obvious gains you get when you decide to floss your teeth every day.

 

  • A cleaner mouth– Brushing is great, but it will only get you so far. Toothbrushes are designed to help you physically clean the surface of your teeth but they cannot adequately reach between teeth. Flossing allows you to remove left over food debris, bacteria, and plaque buildup that your toothbrush cannot reach, leaving you with a cleaner feeling mouth.

 

  • Healthier teeth and gums– Flossing helps rid your mouth of plaque, food particles, and bacteria that can cause gum infections, cavities, and tooth decay. Removing plaque on a daily basis by practicing flossing prevents the plaque from turning into tartar. Tartar is difficult to remove and will lead to issues such as gingivitis and cavities. Flossing is one more step you can take in keeping your mouth healthy.

 

  • A whiter smile– Plaque buildup is not only detrimental to your oral health, it also affects the appearance of your teeth. When plaque builds up, it attracts stains and makes your teeth appear discolored. Whether from the food you eat or the drinks you drink, too much plaque can mean a dull, stained smile. Flossing helps remove plaque and keeps your smile looking brighter, longer.

 

  • Fresher breath– When bacteria reside in the mouth, they cause bad breath. Plaque and food particles are a breeding ground for the growth of bacteria in the mouth. Bacteria can be reduced with flossing by ridding your teeth of plaque buildup and leftover food debris. If you struggle with bad breath, flossing can help you move towards fresher breath.

Flossing might be a tedious habit to develop but once you get in the practice of flossing, you will reap the benefits. Not only will flossing keep your mouth healthy, it will also save you money in dental treatments that can be avoided by practicing good oral hygiene.

At Easton Dentists, we want you to know that we have your best interest in mind. If you have questions about flossing or would like to be shown the proper technique, ask one of our dental professionals at your next appointment. Contact us today to schedule your next visit!