The “Harmless” Habit That Could Make Your Teeth Fall Out. Literally.

Nov 19th, 2016
Easton Dentists Nov 14th, 2016

BiteGuard

Do you wake up some mornings with a headache of origins you can’t define? Do you experience vague muscle pain in your face? If so, you may be experiencing symptoms of bruxism. What’s bruxism? You likely know it by its more informal name – two names, actually: “clenching” and “grinding.” It’s also not something you’ll want to ignore, because bruxism wears down the surface of your teeth and sets you up for cavities and tooth fractures. Severe cases can even contribute to tooth loss. Let’s find out how to stop this menace in its tracks.

 

What Causes Bruxism?

At The Dental Center at Easton, we’ve seen many factors can combine to create a bruxism habit. Stress and anxiety are believed to be leading causes, as are a misaligned bite, missing teeth, and sleep abnormalities. Some medications can also trigger episodes, as can neurological or musculature illnesses. If you’re experiencing pain or discomfort due to bruxism, give us a call at (614) 414-0111.

 

Why Should I Be Concerned About Teeth Grinding? Isn’t It Normal?

Teeth grinding may be common, but it’s not “normal,” per se. Because the stresses of bruxism affect the entire jaw, this pressure can create cracks and chips in teeth, and over time can contribute to a shortening of lower face height due to bone loss. If that sounds scary, it should. It’s also a change you’ve seen before – in individuals who have lost all their teeth and do not wear dentures. We’re pretty sure that’s not a look you’re aiming to achieve.

 

How Do I Know I Have a Problem, and What Treatments Are Available?

In many cases, we’ll be able to see evidence of bruxism in your X-rays – and on the surface of your teeth – and will alert you to the problem long before you exhibit a single symptom, particularly if you sleep alone.  Occasionally however, you may start to clench and grind between visits and begin to notice symptoms on your own. If that’s more like your situation, and you find that you often wake with a sore jaw, a headache that goes away shortly after rising, or if a loved one tells you your teeth are making clickity-clankity noises all night, mention it the next time you’re visiting us.

As far as treatment goes, because the causes of bruxism are varied, the treatments vary as well. If we determine stress is the primary cause, we’ll likely recommend you abstain from excessive caffeine and alcohol, and attempt some form of daily relaxation. Even something as simple as a warm bath before sleeping can work wonders.

If your bite is a concern, we may suggest you visit an orthodontist for an evaluation, and if prescription medicine or neuromuscular illnesses are believed to be the cause, referral to the appropriate specialist would be part of your plan to break the habit.

In each of these cases, though, we’ll likely recommend a splint, or occlusal mouth guard to protect your teeth and bone from further damage. These protective devices are easy to wear, and contrary to what you may believe, will not impede your ability to get a good night’s sleep. In fact, they tend to enhance the quality of your sleep so you’ll wake up more refreshed.

So, the next time you’re sitting in one of our super-comfy chairs at The Dental Center at Easton, ask if some sort of guard may be right for you. Many people go years without being aware they’re clenching and grinding since it takes time for symptoms to show in your mouth. Getting a mouthguard or splint once you know you have this habit, though, will help you with headaches and muscle pain now – and tooth trouble down the road. And, we make some beautiful, comfortable mouthguards at The Dental Center at Easton!

Saving Space for Permanent Teeth with a Space Maintainer

Nov 16th, 2016
Easton Dentists Nov 14th, 2016

space_maintainer

If your little one’s teeth have begun to fall out, and their permanent replacements appear to be lagging far behind, you may wish to consider a space maintainer to minimize future orthodontic work. Believe it or not, the absence of your child’s teeth might seem cute now, but those tiny little gaps can cause deep gouges in your pocketbook as you watch them fill up with teeth that don’t belong there. Space maintainers are simple to use, kids get along fine with them, and they have become the de-facto standard for protecting the cosmetic and functional aspects of your growing child’s mouth.

 

Why Your Child Might Need a Space Maintainer

When a child’s tooth is lost early due to trauma, tooth decay, or nature’s insistence that it drop out before its permanent replacement is due, a space maintainer can be used to hold back the natural inclination of teeth to move forward. Without preventing this movement, teeth that should be in the rear of our mouths end up along the sides, and take up precious real estate destined for another tenant. The result is overcrowding, and in some cases impacted teeth. In the end, it’s always easier to save the space now, then create it later.

 

How They Work

Space maintainers are very similar in purpose and design to an adult “bridge,” but instead of placing artificial teeth over the gap, the space is kept open to accommodate its future resident. At The Dental Center, we make most space maintainers out of metal, (sometimes both metal and plastic), and custom-mold them to the shape of your child’s mouth. In most cases, the maintainer is made up of a metal band attached to a rectangular-shaped wire that butts up against the tooth across the gap. This acts to temporarily preserve the space where the baby tooth once was, so its replacement can erupt without obstruction. To some, the final product looks like an old Radio Flyer® snow sled, or a shoe horn you might use to maintain the shape of unworn shoes.

 

Does My Child Need One?

It’s important to note that dental space maintainers are not required for all childhood tooth loss, and that we’re not going to suggest you create a decade worth of space maintainers as each tooth falls out of your child’s mouth. Our bodies are quite effective at saving space for the loss of our front teeth as well as our incisors – it’s the teeth along the sides of our mouths that tend to cause the majority of complications. Of course, each mouth is different, so be sure to discuss with us the best course of action for you and your child. If your child has recently lost a tooth, or several teeth, and it’ll be awhile before they’re scheduled to see Dr. Gilmer, give us a call at (614) 414-0111 to see if you should come in a little earlier.

Using a space maintainer is an affordable and effective way to ensure your child’s teeth come in where they are supposed to, and when they’re ready. It can have a positive effect on your wallet, reduce the amount of time your child needs to wear braces, and control the cosmetic appearance of your child’s teeth and mouth.

Energy Drinks and Your Child’s Teeth. Should You Worry?

Nov 14th, 2016
Easton Dentists Nov 30th, 2016

Energy Drink

The hard clack of cleats echo about as your “little” sports hero rushes to get out of the house … soon to be late for practice. Armed with all they’ll need for a day in the sun, their equipment bag is packed and slung awkwardly over one shoulder, bursting at the seams with untold numbers of pads and dirty gear. And after making a final beeline through the kitchen to raid your refrigerator of a 64oz bottle or two of rainbow-colored sustenance, they’re off for what will no doubt be another grueling practice session. You’re proud of your kids – they’re growing up. And yet you wonder as you stare at the door that just shut behind them. Are those techni-colored drinks they’re drinking every day hurting them?

The truth, unfortunately, is yes. While they may keep your children energized and awake for the next few hours, the bad news is, they’re secretly eating away at their teeth – and fast.

Why Are Energy Drinks Such a Threat to Teeth?

The crux of the problem is the double-whammy that comes from an exceedingly high sugar content and citric acid pH that can be as low as 2.9. Now, we understand pH can be a tricky thing to understand, so to help put that number in perspective, a bit, consider this: battery acid has a pH of 0.0 (so, a lower number means a higher acid content). Stomach acid (which we can imagine as being quite acidic, at least!) has a pH that fluctuates between 1.0 and 3.0.  A lemon, in contrast, comes in at around 2.0, a grapefruit at 3.0, and tomato juice at 4.0.

The real distinction though is in knowing that with each increase in numerical value, the acid intensity increases 10-fold. So, in the example above, a lemon ends up being 10 times more acidic than a grapefruit, and 100 times more acidic than tomato juice – a sensation you can certainly taste if you bite into one!  In contrast, milk and water have a pH of 7.0, so, it’s easy to see the difference in the numbers – they’re huge.

The Science

What all this means to your child’s teeth is the real question, though, and precisely what researchers at Southern Illinois University set out to discover in 2012.  The results, which surprised even the research team, showed considerable damage to tooth enamel after only five days of steady consumption. Five days.

To determine the effect of these drinks on our teeth, the research team looked at 22 popular sports and energy drinks, and exposed artificial tooth enamel to the beverages for 15 minutes at a time, four times daily. This schedule was chosen because it mirrors the consumption habits of many users who drink these beverages every few hours – a particularly common habit among those who consume sports drinks, particularly when your kids are involved in sports.  After each 15-minute exposure, the enamel was then placed into an artificial saliva solution for two hours to mimic what would happen once consumption stopped.  After only five days on this schedule, the enamel showed a 1.5% loss with sports drinks, and a shocking 3% loss with energy drinks.

We have seen to many patients in their younger years already suffering from extensive enamel loss. One case was especially heartbreaking because the patient thought they were doing a great job simply by staying away from soda. The result: it gave that patient more perceived  freedom to consume these sport drinks at a higher rate because they were “better” than soda.

The Critics

While critics in the beverage industry suggest the time used to expose the enamel to the drinks may have been excessive, it’s widely known that snacking, as well as regular sipping of any beverage other than water, creates acidic activity in the mouth that promotes tooth decay. Of course, adults also need to be careful, and if you’re the weekend warrior type, or are pulling shifts and consuming these beverages throughout the day, the time of exposure might actually not be long enough.  The sweet spot is in the middle-ground, and that’s basically the advice we’re going to offer today.

There is no doubt that these beverages are not good for our teeth. They’re also not good for our stomach, and esophagus if one is prone to acid reflux.

The Middle Ground — It’s about being Informed

We’re not asking you to force your kids to give up their sports beverages and energy drinks. However, it is wise to know the risks, and to understand how you can help your kids combat some of their side-effects. Here are two quick tips that will help if they can’t shake the habit:

  • Have them keep water nearby so they sip on it to dilute the acid covering their teeth. This also increases saliva production to help protect tooth enamel.
  • Suggest that they don’t brush immediately after consuming such beverages.  Why? Because in the thirty minutes to an hour after consumption, tooth enamel will be slightly softer, and brushing in this window of time literally ends up spreading the acid around to other parts of the teeth. Not good.  If brushing is desired, save it for an hour or so after.

Lastly, here is the breakdown of most caustic to least caustic drinks as found by the researchers. Remember, the lower the number, the more harmful to your teeth!

Sports Drinks:

  • Filtered Ionozed Alkaline H2O – pH: 10.0
  • Water – pH: 7.o
  • Odwalla Carrot juice – pH: 6.2
  • Odwalla Vanilla Monster – pH: 5.8
  • Unflavored Pedialyte – pH: 5.4
  • Vita coco – pH: 5.2
  • Aquafina,Dasani, Smart water – pH: 4.0
  • GU2O – pH: 4.29
  • Powerade – pH: 3.89
  • Accelerade – pH: 3.86
  • Gatorade Endurance – pH:  3.22
  • Monster – pH:  2.7

Energy Drinks:

  • Red Bull – pH: 3.3
  • AMP Energy – pH: 2.7
  • Monster Energy – pH: 2.7
  • Full Throttle  – pH: 1.45
  • Rock Star – pH: 1.5

P.S. Don’t forget the mouthguard!

Healthy Halloween! Smart Ways To Combine Dental Health With Halloween

Oct 31st, 2016
Easton Dentists Oct 31st, 2016

halloween-candy-main

Halloween is here, this means fun time for the kids. They will eat lots of candy and probably stockpile sweets for the winter. This is perfectly normal behavior for kids. The only problem is that sweets and candy may not translate to healthy teeth and a bright smile. Now we cannot ban candy during the Halloween because we want to enforce strict standards of dental hygiene. However, we can give the kids tips on dental care so that candy will not lead to cavities. Below are some smart ways to ensure that our kids maintain Healthy Halloween.

Communicate with the kids

Children are not magicians so they cannot know what they have not been taught. Parents should explain the connection between sweets and cavities to the kids. Just teach the kids to brush their teeth immediately after eating candies and they will get the message.

Limit the sweets

After trick or treat night, limit how much candy your children consume for the night. Why?

  1. Sugary Snacks – Halloween favorites like candy corn contain a huge amount of sugar which leads to tooth decay.
  2. Chewy Sweets – Gummy candies are delicious but the remains get stuck in teeth and are a serious source of tooth decay.
  3. Sticky Sweets – Dried fruits may seem like a healthy choice to hand out for Halloween but as with chewy sweets, these fruits stick to your teeth and make it very hard for saliva to wash remains away.  Fresh fruits are the way to go if you’re going with the alternative route.
  4. Sour Candy – This may come as little surprise to you, however sour candy contain acid which erodes tooth enamel and helps foster tooth decay.

Show them a video or invite your dentist over

A picture is worth a thousand words and a movie is more effective than a lecture. Show the kids an interesting movie on proper dental care because this will make the right impression on them. In fact, this is a smart move because it will make Halloween a wonderful experience for the kids.

This is the perfect time to invite your family dentist to give an informal lecture to the kids. Make this a part of the Halloween festivities and it will have the right impact. Your family dentist or his representative should lecture the kids on proper dental hygiene, effective brushing techniques and flossing the teeth. For best results, the dental expert should join the kids in eating candy.

Healthy dental habits will keep kids’ teeth in great shape for years to come and will make dentist trips quick and painless.

 

This Halloween, remember that moderation is key.  Enjoy those sweets but make sure you’re taking good care of your teeth all year.  Schedule your cleaning appointment with Easton Dentist today and we’ll make sure you stay on track. The Dental Center is here for regular checkups and any emergencies that may arise. Contact us today to schedule an appointment for everyone in the family.

Best Foods To Eat To Keep a Healthy Mouth

Oct 31st, 2016
Easton Dentists Oct 31st, 2016

Best Foods To Eat To Keep a Healthy Mouth

food

Preventative health measures for a healthy mouth can start with your diet. Depending on the foods and snacks you eat can keep your teeth and gums healthy.

Calcium For Healthy Teeth

Two of the best products for healthy teeth are milk and cheese. While they both provide calcium, they provide additional benefits. The calcium in milk is absorbed faster because milk contains Vitamin D. Calcium-rich cheese destroys bacteria in your mouth.

Chewy Vegetables For Healthy Gums And Teeth

When you chew fresh vegetables, it will keep your teeth strong and your gums healthy. Carrots, onions, and celery provide important nutrition while keeping your mouth healthy. They reduce the bacteria in your mouth by increasing saliva. Carrots also contain beta-carotene for strong teeth.

Apples For A Healthy Mouth

When it comes to dental health, all fruits are not equal. You can have the healthiest mouth if you choose apples instead of citrus fruits. Citrus fruits are acidic, and can harm your tooth enamel.

Strawberries For White Teeth

You can eat strawberries for natural teeth whitening. With their nutritional benefits, strawberries can be an inexpensive alternative to over-the-counter whitening products.

Healthy Foods With Protein Contain Phosphorus

Some of the most common protein-rich foods provide phosphorus for healthy teeth. Eggs, fish, and meat contribute to strong, healthy tooth enamel.

Healthy Foods With Magnesium

Magnesium is also important for healthy tooth enamel. Some popular foods that are high in magnesium include bananas, spinach, and whole grains.

Shiitake Mushrooms For Dental Health

When you are looking for a different snack for yourself or your children, or want to add something special to a recipe, consider the dental health benefits of shiitake mushrooms. Not only will they destroy harmful bacteria in your mouth, they are a natural way to stop plaque from building up on your teeth. You will be less likely to develop cavities when you include the mushrooms in your diet.

 

Here at The Dental Center we recommend maintaining a balanced diet, and include some of these products every day. You can enjoy good nutrition, delicious food, and dental health.

For more information on preventative health measures and more information on some more of the best foods to eat to keep a healthy mouth, contact our Columbus office today and schedule your next cleaning!

 

 

Frequencies of Dental Issues Occurring Amongst Patients

Sep 29th, 2016
Easton Dentists Oct 4th, 2016

Every individual’s mouth is filled with bacteria. If regular brushing and regular visits to the dentist were ignored, the bacteria in your mouth will cause serious issues that dentists encounter on a daily basis. Some of these problems are very preventable and most times, do not require a dentist to fix.

Here are some of the most frequent dental issues that patients experience and how to prevent them:

Chipped Teeth

Chipped teeth occur when teeth experience extreme physical trauma. Fractures can be caused from eating hard foods, teeth grinding, playing a contact sport or activity, and more. Depending on how much of the tooth has been lost, you may experience pain in the tooth’s pulp and increased sensitivity. Rough edges may even occur when you run your tongue against the chipped edge. A dentist would be required to fix this fracture by putting a dental cap or crown over the fractured tooth—and in serious cases a dental implant.

To prevent chipped teeth, limit yourself from eating hard foods, wear a mouth guard when playing sports, rigorous activities, or even when you go to bed.

Teeth Grinding

Teeth grinding, also known as Bruxism, often occurs when you go to bed. Teeth grinding can lead to very serious problems such as fracturing, loosening, and loss of teeth.

To prevent your teeth from grinding, buy an over-the-counter mouth guard, or have your dentist fit you with a custom-made mouth guard. If your stress is causing your Bruxism; attend a stress and counseling program, start exercising, learn stress relieving techniques, and if you are aware of your clinching, train yourself not to clench.

Gingivitis

Gingivitis is the infection of the gums, or the Gingiva, caused by plaque. Plaque is a substance that is a biofilm of food and bacteria that accumulates over time. If dental plaque constantly builds up, gums may become swollen, red, bleed easily, and you may even experience bad breath.

Brushing your teeth for two to three minutes twice a day, eating healthy foods, avoiding acidic foods, going to your regular checkups, avoiding many forms of tobacco, and using mouth wash daily can prevent gingivitis from building up.

Cavities

According to the CDC, one in four adults have an untreated cavity, and nearly every adult will experience tooth decay at some point in their lives. Depending on the extent of the tooth decay, a dentist may either suggest a filling, a crown or in extreme cases, a root canal.

Preventing cavities from appearing is just like preventing Gingivitis, brush your teeth for two to three minutes a day, eat healthy foods, avoid acidic foods, visit your dentist regularly, avoid tobacco, and use mouth wash daily. Following these preventative measures can dramatically lower your risk for cavities and costly visits to the dentist.

If you are experiencing any of these problems, it is highly advised that you see a dental professional. Although these minor dental problems may not seem serious at first, as time progresses, these could become severe.

At The Dental Center at Easton Town Center, Dr. Glimer and our caring staff understand your dental concerns. We pride ourselves on providing the best care and attention you need to keep your smile healthy. If you have any questions regarding your oral health, make an appointment with us today!

What To Look For When Selecting a Dentist

Sep 17th, 2016
Easton Dentists Nov 29th, 2016

Dentists work with a lot of patients day in and day out. Just as in any profession, there are individual dentists who enjoy their job with a passion and excel at it, and there are others who just do the minimum to get by. When looking for a dentist, it is important to look for qualities that will make you feel welcomed.

If you are looking for a dentist, here are some traits and qualities that make great dentists:

Easy to Talk to

The best dentists try to learn about their patients on a more personal level before treating them to make them feel comfortable. This makes the patients less anxious and makes them feel like the dentist truly cares about them.

Trustworthiness

There are a lot of sharp and hazardous objects that dentists use every day: syringes, dental picks, drills, x-ray machines and other types of dental equipment. As a patient, you should be able to trust that your dentist is capable of making your experience pain-free and pleasant.

Passionate

There are a lot of dentists who become burnt out in their careers. It is very important to find a dentist that comes to work every day with passion, a smile, a great attitude, and leaves work the same way. These kinds of dentists are eager to constantly learn about new techniques and procedures in dentistry that make life easier for them and their patients.

Great Communicator

Successful dentists can convey their thoughts clearly and efficiently to their patients and staff. Whether it is a simple routine or a complex procedure, a dentist must be able to communicate this important information to you effectively.
At The Dental Center at Easton Town Center, we understand your thoughts and concerns. Visiting a dentist should never be uncomfortable or intimidating. Dr. Gilmer and his professional staff are committed to making every office visit a positive experience. We encourage you to ask questions; together we can make sound decisions about the dental and oral healthcare for you and your family. Schedule an appointment with us today!

The Perfect Road Map For Your Child’s Oral Health

Sep 15th, 2016
Easton Dentists Sep 15th, 2016

Kid Roadmap

On July 3rd, 1806, two years into their journey to chart the uncharted west of America, pioneer explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark reached a challenge of epic proportion – the Rocky Mountains. What next, they wondered? Without a map, they were forced to do what explorers do – explore, and hope for the best. So, that got us thinking. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a handy map you could use to chart your own dental health? With that in mind, and in honor of our explorers, we at The Dental Center at Easton wanted to share with you a few mile markers you can use to stay on top of your child’s health today, next year, and for years to come!

 

6 to 24 months

When you’re a new parent, life is a whirlwind, and the dental care of your newborn may not be top of mind when you look in their mouths and see no teeth! Here are some things to keep in mind:

Schedule your regular visit: As soon as that first tooth comes in, you’ll want to give us a call at (614) 414-0111 to schedule your regular visit so we can review your next steps and the steps for your child. Also, be aware the ADA recommends fluoridated toothpaste now for all children under the age of three. Don’t wait!

Ask us about:

  • Home hygiene basics: Things like, tips and tricks on brushing and other care. There’s nothing better than having our hygienists give brushing tutorials – they’re experts!
  • Preventative dentistry: The possible need for fluoride supplements
  • Dietary strategies: Achieving a balanced diet early in life for good oral health later
  • Feeding practice awareness: Bottle, breastfeeding, and no-spill training cups
  • Non-nutritive oral habits: Thumb sucking, pacifiers
  • Making Dental Visits Normal: Even from a young age, your child should be very comfortable visiting the dentists. He or she should build that regular habit while young to keep a strong sense of normalcy.

 

2 to 12 years old

Ah, the little ones are growing up. Teeth are coming in at all sorts of crazy angles, and you’re going crazy from the rise in obligations. Here’s a quick list of what to consider during this time frame:

  • Preventative dentistry: Pit and fissure sealants can do wonders for keeping your child’s dental bills down, and their teeth in their head until they’re ready to fall out naturally. Ask us about them. They’re affordable AND useful. And, super-fast, you’ll be in and out in no time.
  • Orthodontic Consultation: Visiting an orthodontist for an early consultation is best done around your child’s seventh birthday. With today’s technology, early intervention can reduce the cost and duration of braces when your child gets older.

 

The Teen Years

The years “everything” happens! As children start to come into their own, new habits and desires begin to unfold as well. You’ll have to address every imaginable concern during these years, from piercings, to calls for whitening, braces, and the need to refer yourself away from your pediatric dentist and to a general dentist for continuing oral care. So, speak with us about:

  • Cosmetic Dentistry: What solutions are advisable now, and what things should be avoided.
  • Teen social pressures: Smoking, alcohol, intraoral/perioral piercings and the like. Believe it or not, we can help a lot with this. Does your teen have a favorite Dental Center hygienist? We might be able to arrange for that person to help when your teen comes in so they can address these concerns with an intermediary they trust. Give us a call at (614) 414-0111 to see how we can help!
  • Orthodontics: Options for minimizing appearance and health problems later in life.
  • Home hygiene tips: Brushing, flossing, choosing the right mouthwash.
  • Craniofacial injury prevention: With your children’s possible participation in sports, you’ll want to get them a mouthguard. Hands down it’ll be one of your best investments in a healthy mouth. And we make great ones here at The Dental Center!
  • Positive Reinforcement: Your teen hears lots of feedback from every direction, but it can be very helpful to hear the benefits of good oral health from a different voice then they hear everything else. We will work hard to reinforce this necessary message with you to your teen!

Staying on top of your child’s oral health isn’t as hard as you think, and if you keep this schedule handy, you’ll be ahead of most of your neighbor’s kids when it comes to a healthy mouth and body. Come to think of it … why not share it with them as well? They’ll thank you for the help.

How to Become a Dentist

Sep 14th, 2016
Easton Dentists Oct 4th, 2016

“I wrote a song about dental floss, but did anyone’s teeth get cleaner?”  — Frank Zappa

Dentists are the medical professionals that specialize behind the most beautiful of smiles. Day after day, patient after patient, these medical individuals diagnose, treat, and prevent the most common and uncommon oral problems.  These problems can range from plaque build up to oral cancer.

But what does it take to be a dentist in the state of Ohio?

 

Enroll in a Bachelor’s Degree Program

Traditionally, those becoming aspiring dentists opt for a science-related or pre-dentistry majors to increase their chances of being accepted to dental school.  However, exceptions have been made for individuals who complete an undergraduate degree in an unrelated field.

 

Take the Dental Admissions Test

The Dental Admissions Test is an examination that grants a prospective dental school candidate admission to a college of dentistry.  The exam is five hours long, contains 280 multiple-choice questions, and its topics include natural sciences, mathematics, and perceptual ability.

 

Graduate from an Accredited Dental College

Upon completion of any pre-dentistry or science-related undergraduate programs and the Dental Admissions Test, a prospective dentist must graduate from an accredited dental college with either a Doctorate of Dental Surgery or a Doctorate of Dental Medicine.

The first 2 years of dental school encompasses a heavy general dental science curriculum. Upon the final 2 years of dental school, students must participate in clinical practicum and get hands-on experience in dental clinics under supervision.

 

Obtain Licensure

In the United States, all dentists must obtain a license to practice dentistry.  To obtain licensure, a dentist must take a 2-part exam covering dental science, ethics and clinical procedures given by the state.

 

Consider a Specialization

Finally, a prospective dentist must also declare a specialty with the American Dental Association (ADA) and the state in which they want to practice. The ADA recognizes 9 different specialty areas: Public Health Dentistry, Prosthodontics, Endodontics, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Orthodontics, Periodontics and Pediatric Dentistry.  Becoming a specialist in dentistry usually entails an additional 2-4 year education and residency (depending on the state’s requirements) to obtain a specialty license.

At The Dental Center at Easton Town Center, Dr. Brad Gilmer graduated successfully with honors from THE Ohio State University and is currently a member of The American Dental Association, The Ohio Dental Association, The Columbus Dental Society, and The Chicago Dental Society.  With years of practical experience under his belt, you can rest assured that you are in caring and more-than-qualified hands.

Our highly experienced and welcoming staff deeply care about our patients.  We provide only the best dental care at an affordable price for you and your family.  If you are due for a check-up, schedule an appointment with us, we would love to meet you; we want to make your visit as pleasant

Common Dental Problems Dentists Face

Sep 4th, 2016
Easton Dentists Oct 4th, 2016

Every day, Dentists face some common dental problems, some more common than others. At first, some of these problems may not be serious. If ignored and not addressed, eventually, they can lead to serious problems.

Here are some of the problems that dentists face daily:

Bad Breath

Bad breath, also technically known as Halitosis, is a common dental problem that many individuals have. Bad breath can be caused by dry mouth, cavities, gum disease, bacteria on the tongue, and even oral cancers.

Even though a majority of individuals use mouthwash to stop bad breath, mouthwash may just be masking the underlying problem. In rare cases, there may be a serious concern that needs to be addressed.

Cavities

There are different forms of tooth decay, but the most common form of decay that dentists face are cavities.

Cavities occur when a sticky and hard substance called Plaque produce acids that erode the tooth enamel. Plaque is formed by a combination of bacteria, sugar and starches. Depending on how advanced the cavity has spread, in most cases, a filling would be a proper procedure to fix a cavity. However, in more serious cases, a root canal would be the proper course of treatment.

Preventing cavities and tooth decay is relatively easy: brush your teeth at least twice a day, floss daily, go to your regular checkups and eat healthy by avoiding foods that are heavy in starches and sugars.

Gum Disease

Gingivitis and Periodontitis are infections of the gums and the soft tissue of the mouth. These infections are also one of the main causes of all tooth decay among adults.

On the surface, these infections may not be serious, but gum disease is strongly linked to heart disease and stroke.

To prevent gum diseases, it is critical to brush at least twice a day and floss.

 

Unattractive Smile

Although unattractive smiles are not considered a medical dental problem, they may be considered a problem to people who are unhappy with their smile. Unattractive smiles are a reason why individuals seek treatment to correct these problems.

A smile is important to an individual’s self-esteem. Fortunately, with advancements and techniques in dental sciences, virtually everyone can have a smile that they can be happy with. Through teeth whitening, dental implants, dental bridges, dental partials, or any other cosmetic work, your dentist can achieve your perfect smile.
If you believe that you have any of these common dental problems, it is highly advised that you see a dentist. Although these minor dental problems may not seem serious at first, as time progresses, these could become severe.

At The Dental Center at Easton Town Center, Dr. Glimer, an experienced board certified dentist, deeply cares and understands your dental concerns. Our staff wants you to know that we are highly trained and that we pride ourselves on providing the best care and attention you need to keep your smile healthy. If you believe you have any concerns above or questions regarding your oral health, make an appointment with us today!