Effects of Soda on Your Teeth

Jul 23rd, 2018
Easton Dentists Jul 23rd, 2018

Ever seen those videos where someone puts a baby tooth in a glass of soda and watches it decay? Well, the effect of soda in an actual mouth is a bit different.

You have your saliva to help wash away the sugar, you eat other things throughout the day, and brush at least twice a day to remove debris or plaque. Nevertheless, soda is not something we recommend you consume more often than a once-in-awhile treat. Here’s why:

 

1. Sugar

Soda has an extremely high sugar content. The bacteria that cause tooth decay feed off of sugar and excrete acid, which is what causes tooth decay. The more sugar our teeth have to interact with, the more prone to decay they will be.

 

2. Acid

Think diet soda is a better alternative? Even though it contains zero sugar, it can still contain acids such as phosphoric acid or citric acid. Acid eats away at a tooth’s enamel and leaves it prone to decay.

 

3. Colors

Caramel color, Yellow 5, etc. Any type of artificial coloring can cause tooth-staining. If you prefer your teeth sparkling white, it’s best to stay away from soda.

 

Alternatives!

Instead of soda, we recommend spicing up your daily beverages with other alternatives. How about some sparkling water or plain water infused with fresh fruit?

When you do drink soda, make sure to rinse with water afterwards. And, as always, keep up with regular brushing and flossing to protect those precious teeth!

What to Expect When Getting Your Wisdom Teeth Removed

Jul 9th, 2018
Easton Dentists Sep 4th, 2018

Wisdom teeth removal has become common in the dental field. It is mostly a preventive surgical procedure as wisdom teeth have been known to cause problems if left unremoved. Most people have their wisdom teeth removed as teenagers or young adults. If you need your wisdom teeth removed, go to the dental center and consult with an oral maxillofacial surgeon. After the procedure, you will need to rest up and give yourself time to recover. Below are what to expect during and after a wisdom teeth removal procedure.

1. Local Anesthetic

During the procedure, the dentist will need to use a local anesthetic. You won’t be conscious for the surgery. Have a friend drive you to the dental center as you won’t be able to drive yourself back home.

2. Recovery Time

After the procedure, the area swelling up is a natural reaction. The swelling will subside after 24 hours. Place a cold compact on the swollen area and keep your head up to control the swelling.

3. Rest Up

You will need a decent amount of time to recover from a wisdom teeth removal procedure. The Columbus dentist will give you a subscription for pain medication. Ensure you also rest up to speed up the healing process.

4. Soft Foods

For you to recover fast, make sure you stick to soft foods. Avoid eating anything that will aggregate the healing area. The foods you eat should not be too hot as this will slow down the healing process. Stick to warm soup dishes and foods that do not require chewing.

5. Brushing your Teeth

Even though keeping your mouth clean is good practice, refrain from brushing your teeth as this might undo your stitches. You should not even use mouthwash. You can use gauze to wipe your mouth, making sure not to make contact with the stitches.

Conclusion

Wisdom teeth removal is a preventive procedure that is recommended for everyone. In case your wisdom teeth cause damage to your jaws or other teeth, make an appointment at the dentist center and have them removed.

Root Canal Therapy: Nipping The Pain In The Bud

Jul 4th, 2018
Easton Dentists Sep 4th, 2018

Nothing comes close in terms of pain than a good old fashioned toothache. And while most of us devour pain killers -and sometimes even morphine- to lull the pain to sleep, a toothache always comes back, stronger, more unbearable than ever before. However, treating the root cause of the problem -and I mean that literally- is a surefire way to get rid of the pain for good, and that’s where root canal procedures come in. You may have heard about it before in passing, but what really is this miracle called root canal treatment after all.

Also known as endodontic therapy, root canal treatment is a dental procedure for eliminating infections from inside the tooth so as to prevent future infection. So, why root canal you may ask? Well, the pulp -the part of a tooth containing nerve tissue and blood vessels- is also referred to as the root canal.

A Few Fact About Root Canal Therapy

* The primary purpose of root canal therapy is to end the pain for good! Which is why it is used to eliminate the nerves located in the pulp -root canals- of the tooth. For your own information, nerves being the source of all bodily sensations, removing them has the obvious effect of making your gums and teeth insensitive to pain.

* Make no mistake about it, it’s a relatively painful pain relieving treatment. However, the flip-side to that is it’s a once off procedure that leaves you with a pain free root canal.

The stages in the dental procedure are pretty straightforward perhaps even a toddler can do better than a regular Columbus Dentist at The Dental Center.

It all starts with the cleaning of the root canal while your under anesthesia. The root canal is decontaminated and filled with dental cement, after which a crown is added to reinforce the brittle and fragile tooth.

 

Causes of Sensitive Teeth

Jun 9th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jul 9th, 2018

There’s nothing better on a hot summer’s day than a scoop of nice, cold ice cream. That is, unless you suffer from sensitive teeth. If you do, eating cold foods like ice cream can cause you a lot of pain. There are many causes of sensitive teeth. Below, we’ve outlined a few of the most common ones.

1. Brushing your teeth too hard

It may come as a surprise that you could be brushing your teeth too intensely. After all, we tend to think that the harder we brush, the cleaner our teeth. In actuality, however, brushing your teeth too hard can wear away the protective layers of your teeth. Over time, this will expose the tiny hollow tubes that lead to your dental nerves. Once this happens, you’ll likely experience sensitivity to extreme temperatures as well as acidic and sticky foods. Luckily, switching to a softer tooth brush and treating your teeth more gently can go a long way toward preventing increased sensitivity.

2. Grinding your teeth

Grinding your teeth causes sensitivity similarly to how brushing your teeth too hard causes sensitivity: you wear away the protective layers of your teeth until your nerves are easily triggered. If you suspect you grind your teeth, you should see a dentist right away. A mouth guard can help to prevent further damage.

3. Receding Gums

If your gums are receding, the sensitive roots of your teeth with be exposed. As a result, you’ll experience severe sensitivity. Receding gums can be caused by gum disease and grow more common with age. If you believe your gums are receding, you should see your dentist right away. He or she will develop a treatment plan to cure your gum disease and may also perform a procedure to seal your teeth.

If you’re suffering from sensitive teeth, be sure to mention it to your dentist. There may be fairly simple steps you can take to decrease your current sensitivity and to prevent further sensitivity in the future.

Don’t Overdo the Sports Drinks

Jun 9th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jul 9th, 2018

As the summer heats up, you may find that you’re tempted to load up on sports drinks like Gatorade and Powerade. These beverages taste great, but they shouldn’t be your go-to drink. In fact, if you’re not engaged in the strenuous physical activity for which these drinks were designed, you should avoid them entirely.

In addition to the fact that sports drinks often contain a lot of sugar and other not-so-healthy ingredients, they tend to be very acidic. The acid in these beverages can destroy the enamel on your teeth. In fact, just five consecutive days of drinking these acidic beverages can negatively affect your enamel.

As acid destroys your enamel, it makes your teeth more vulnerable to bacteria. As a result, you may experience increased tooth staining, decay, and hypersensitivity. The best way to avoid these dental issues is to do whatever you can to protect your enamel.

If you are set on drinking sports drinks, you should be sure to rinse your mouth with water after drinking them. Doing so will rinse some of the acid away from your teeth before it can do much damage. In addition, you should brush your teeth about an hour after drinking these beverages. It’s best not to brush your teeth immediately after drinking something acidic because the enamel on your teeth will be in a weakened state and could be brushed away.

We know a nice, cold sports drink is tempting on a hot day, but it’s best not to make a habit of drinking these beverages. Instead, try to primarily drink water.

If you believe your teeth have been damaged by excessive consumption of acidic beverages, give us a call today. We will examine your teeth and give you pointers for reversing damage if possible and preventing damage in the future. We hope you have a great, tooth-healthy summer!

What to Do When You Crack a Tooth

May 21st, 2018
Easton Dentists May 21st, 2018

Ouch!

Chomp on something your tooth didn’t like? Or get hit in the mouth with a hockey puck?

If you think you may have a cracked tooth, or if you’re holding a piece of your tooth in your
hand, follow these steps!

1. Give us a call to schedule an appointment at 614-414-0111. Let us know about your emergency and we will make our best effort to see you right away! We always try to hold some appointments open for these occasions.

2. If there are tooth fragments that have fallen out, preserve them in a clean container with a moist solution (cold mik, water, saliva), and bring them in to your appointment.

3. Apply a cold pack to your jaw to lessen any pain and swelling.

4. If bleeding, bite down on a gauze pad or a moist tea bag until bleeding stops.

It is also possible to have a cracked tooth and not know it.

If you have any pain when biting down, or when eating something hot or cold, it’s best to get it checked out.

In order to prevent further damage to the tooth or an infection, it’s very important to correct a cracked tooth immediately. Don’t wait until the pain is unbearable. Let us help right away!

Teaching Life-Long Dental Health

May 8th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jun 1st, 2018

Having children means you suddenly have a lot of responsibility. One of these responsibilities is maintaining their dental health. Even before your baby has teeth, there are steps you can take to prepare him or her for life-long dental health. Below, you’ll find some tips that will help you to protect your children’s teeth throughout their lives.

Birth to One Year

For the first six months of your baby’s life, all you need to do to promote dental health is to ensure he has plenty of nutrition. For a baby so young, that means plenty of breast milk or formula. In addition, you should avoid leaving the baby alone with his bottle as this can result in the baby sucking on the bottle long after it’s empty, which can cause teeth to come in crooked.

At about six months, your baby will start to get his first teeth. When this happens, you should schedule your first visit with a pediatric dentist. You should also begin to very gently brush the baby’s gums with a soft-bristle tooth brush that has just been dampened with water.

One Year to Six Years

Start teaching your baby about the importance of dental health from an early age. This can be as simple as picking up a few children’s books at your local library that will teach your child why healthy teeth matter.

During this time, you’ll also need to brush your child’s teeth for him while he watches you in the mirror. You should consult your pediatric dentist to determine what type of toothpaste and how much of it you should use. You should also be taking your child to the dentist for checkups about every six months as well as if you ever suspect a cavity has formed.

It’s also a good idea to brush your own teeth in front of your child so that he can see you care about the health of your own teeth.

Six Years to Eleven Years

During this time, your child should lose his baby teeth and they should be replaced by adult teeth. The exact timing of losing teeth and growing new ones is different for every child. By six years of age, your child should also be brushing his own teeth, although you may wish to supervise to be sure he is not missing any areas of his mouth. As your child grows, you should be able to trust him to brush his teeth well since you have been teaching him the importance of doing so since he was a child.

Eleven Years and Up

You should be able to trust your child to care for his own dental health independently. It is still important, however, to take him for dental checkups every six months. Once all of his adult teeth have come in, it may also be necessary to take him to an orthodontist for braces. You should also continue to have occasional conversations about the importance of dental health.

We hope these tips will help you to raise kids who are set up for life-long dental health. When it’s time for their dental checkups, be sure to give us a call!

What Does Smoking Do to Your Oral Health?

May 7th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jun 1st, 2018

We all know smoking is bad for our health. In fact, smoking is the number one cause of preventable disease and death in the United States and is linked to 480,000 deaths each year. Despite these stark statistics, about 17% of adults in the United States smoke. One thing smokers may not realize is that smoking can significantly damage their oral health.

Smoking and other forms of tobacco use can stain teeth and cause bad breath. In addition, smoking has been found to alter the microbiome of smokers’ mouths. Our oral microbiomes consist of carefully balanced levels of various bacteria. When these levels are altered, there can be serious health consequences.

Over time, the effects of smoking and tobacco use on oral health can grow more severe. In addition to cavities and gum disease, tobacco use can lead to increased rates of oral cancers.

As you can see, tobacco use is detrimental to your oral health in many ways. Luckily, quitting is always an option and the sooner you quit, the better. Scientists have ever found that your oral microbiome will return to its natural state after you quit smoking, although they have yet to determine exactly how long this takes.

If you’re ready to reclaim your health by quitting smoking, the Dental Center team is here to offer our support. Contact us today to learn more about how smoking can damage your oral health. We also recommend calling 1-800-QUIT-NOW for guidance regarding quitting tobacco usage. We know it will be difficult to quit, but we’re certain you have the strength to do it. Just keep reminding yourself that you deserve a long, healthy, and happy life!

The History of the Tooth Fairy

Apr 21st, 2018
Easton Dentists May 1st, 2018

As a dentist, the tooth fairy is particularly close to my heart. She makes the potentially scary event of losing a baby tooth something to look forward to and she encourages good dental hygiene because, after all, no fairy wants to dirty tooth. Recently, I started wondering about the origins of this fairy. How did we begin to tell our children that if they put a tooth beneath their pillow, a fairy would come in the night and take it in exchange for a tooth?

As it turns out, the tooth fairy is a relatively new addition to the folklore of childhood, but the ritualistic disposal of a child’s lost tooth has a long, interesting history. In some cultures, teeth were buried, burned, thrown over a house, or placed near a mouse hole. Over time, the role of the mouse in the disposal of baby teeth grew and, even today, Spanish children leave their teeth for a little rat to take.

In a French story called La Bonne Petite Souris, a good mouse rescues a queen by knocking out the evil king’s teeth. This good mouse then turns out to be a fairy. So, the tooth mouse has become a tooth fairy. It wasn’t until after World War II, however, that the tooth fairy became a part of most American children’s childhoods. This may be thanks, in part, to Tinkerbell and Cinderella, who made fairies a big part of the childhoods of children in the 1950s.

Today, the tooth fairy is an important part of many children’s childhoods. It can also be a great tool for parents who need to encourage better dental hygiene in their children. Just be sure to let them know the tooth fairy likes pearly white teeth!

How to Detect a Cavity

Apr 21st, 2018
Easton Dentists May 1st, 2018

It is important to have your cavities treated as soon as possible to prevent further deterioration. During your regular checkups, your dentist will alert you to any cavities that he or she sees. Between checkups, however, it is important for you to pay attention to signs of cavities. Below, we’ve outlined a few key symptoms to watch out for.

1. Bad Breath or Bad Taste

If your breath seems to have gotten much worse recently and the scent isn’t going away, even when you brush your teeth and tongue regularly, you could have a cavity. Bad breath is sometimes a sign of cavities because the bacteria that causes cavities can also cause bad breath. In addition to bad breath, this bacteria can also cause a bad taste in your mouth that no amount of mouthwash can rinse away.

2. Tooth Pain

This is usually the most obvious symptom of a cavity. The decay of your tooth that is caused by cavities can lead to serious pain. If you experience any tooth pain, see your dentist right away, because this could mean your cavity has been left untreated for a long time.

3. Dark Spots and Holes

If your cavity is left untreated for a long time, you will be able to see it. It may appear as a dark spot on your tooth or as a hole you can see or feel with your tongue. If you can see or feel your cavity, you need to visit your dentist right away.

4. Pus

This is the most serious symptom of a cavity as it means that you have an abscess. Abscesses are serious medical issues that can cause fevers, pain, and swollen glands. If there’s any possibility you have an abscess, see your dentist right away so you can get the antibiotics you need to kill the bacteria.

If you have any of the symptoms we mentioned above, see your dentist as soon as you can. The best way to keep a cavity from becoming something more serious is to treat it early. If you believe you may have an abscess, call us immediately to schedule an emergency visit.