Is the Future of Dentistry Silver?

Feb 26th, 2018
Easton Dentists Feb 26th, 2018

A recent scientific discovery could have big implications for dental practices around the world. This discovery was made by Dr. Carla Meledandri of the University of Otago’s Chemistry department. In fact, the discovery was so significant that Dr. Meledandri received the 2017 Prime Minister’s MacDiarmid Emerging Scientist Prize.

Dr. Meledandri’s discovery was that silver nanoparticles can be used to prevent and treat dental disease without staining the teeth. Nanoparticles are incredibly small parts of a substance. On the nanoscale, these particles look, react, and act differently than they do on a larger scale. Dr. Meledandri has been studying these nanoparticles to better understand how they interact with their surroundings and how they can be used to benefit the world. In addition to discovering their ability to treat and prevent dental disease, Dr. Meledandri found that these nanoparticles may be able to help to mitigate global warming by capturing carbon dioxide and removing it from the atmosphere. These small particles really can make a big impact on the world!

If silver nanoparticles become largely used to treat the bacterial source of tooth decay and infection, the prevalence of antibiotics used to treat this bacteria could be decreased. This could be a great step forward because, although antibiotic treatment often works quite well, it does pose the risk of creating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The silver nanoparticles, however, use a different mechanism to treat bacteria. This mechanism makes it impossible for bacteria to ever grow resistant to it.

At The Dental Center, we’re looking forward to seeing how these silver nanoparticles can benefit dental patients in our office and around the world. We’re always inspired to see the innovations that come from exploring our world and investigating new avenues of treatment. We can’t wait to see what new discoveries will improve dental treatment soon!

How to Brush your Teeth

Feb 26th, 2018
Easton Dentists Feb 26th, 2018

If you’re reading this, you’ve probably been brushing your teeth for many years. The question is, have you been brushing them the right way? Below, you’ll find some of the most important pointers for keeping your pearly whites healthy and looking good for the long term.

1. Take your time

Brushing your teeth should take at least two full minutes. This might not seem like a very long time, but, when you’re brushing, it will likely feel quite long. The best way to make sure you are brushing for long enough is to set a timer on your phone or listen to about half of an average-length song.

2. Use the right brush

Not all toothbrushes are created equally. The best choice in brush is a round-headed electric brush. If electric brushes aren’t for you, we recommend using a manual brush with soft bristles and a small head. The soft bristles are plenty strong enough to remove debris and plaque from your teeth without causing too much wear and tear on your enamel and the small head allows you to better clean hard-to-reach areas of your mouth.

3. Brush everywhere

We tend to brush our teeth where it shows. So, the fronts of our teeth often receive the bulk of our attention. In addition to brushing the fronts of our top and back teeth, however, it is also important to brush the inner surfaces of the teeth, the chewing surfaces, and the tongue. Brushing thoroughly can keep your teeth healthy and, as an added perk, your breath smelling minty fresh.

4. Use the right technique

Although it may make you feel that you’ve cleaned your teeth well, there is no need to furiously saw away at your teeth. Instead, the best approach is to tilt your brush at a 45-degree angle from the gumline and gently roll the brush away from the gumline. Then, gently brush every surface of each tooth using short back-and-forth strokes and, finally, brush your tongue to remove bacteria and freshen your breath.

We hope these toothbrushing tips will help you to keep your smile healthy and bright. In addition to brushing your teeth properly, it is important to visit your dentist for regular checkups. We’re looking forward to seeing you in our office soon!

Prevent Enamel Loss

Jan 30th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 30th, 2018

Enamel is the hard outer layer of your teeth that protects them from wear and tear and prevents them from feeling the temperature extremes of the foods and beverages you eat and drink. If you lose your enamel, your teeth will grow more sensitive and more prone to cavities. There is no way to replace lost enamel, but there are several precautions you can take to prevent enamel loss. By following the tips below, you’ll help to keep your smile healthy for years to come.

1. Avoid acid

By limiting your intake of acidic foods, you can help to prevent enamel erosion. Common acidic culprits include soda and other fizzy drinks, citrus fruits, and juices. When you do choose to consume these acidic items, try to keep them from settling on your teeth. Using a straw or rinsing your mouth with water as you eat or drink can help to keep the acid from eroding your enamel.

2. Be gentle

Brushing your teeth too firmly can lead to enamel erosion. Instead, try to brush gently with a soft toothbrush. You should also wait at least an hour after eating before you brush your teeth. Brushing too soon after a meal can increase your enamel erosion.

3. Assess your overall health

A number of medical conditions can cause enamel erosion. For example, alcoholism, bulimia, and GERD have all been found to result in enamel erosion. This is because each of these conditions causes acid to come into contact with your teeth. If you suffer from any of these conditions, see your doctor immediately.

4. Talk to your dentist

Your dentist can assess the current state of your enamel loss and can help you to develop a plan to prevent further erosion.

Protecting your enamel is an important aspect of maintaining your dental health. Once enamel has been lost, it cannot be replaced. With this in mind, be sure to take all of the precautions you can to prevent enamel erosion.

Avoid These Foods for a Healthier Smile

Jan 30th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 30th, 2018

A healthy smile starts with a healthy diet. In addition to making sure your diet contains plenty of nutritious and vitamin-heavy foods, there are a few foods and beverages you ought to avoid as much as possible. Below, you’ll find a list of some cavity-causing culprits and an explanation of why they cause so much damage to teeth.

1. Ice

This might seem like a strange item to top the list. After all, ice is just frozen water, right? That’s true and ice is totally harmless when used to cool a beverage. It only starts to cause problems when people chew on it. Ice is so hard that crunching on it can damage your enamel and leave your teeth susceptible to dental issues, such as chipped teeth and loosened crowns.

2. Alcohol

Drinking too much alcohol can lead to tooth decay and oral infections, such as gum disease. This is because an excess of alcohol can cause a decrease in the saliva flow to your mouth. Saliva washes away food particles and bacteria and provides protection to the soft tissues in your mouth. When you do not have enough saliva, your mouth becomes more prone to dental issues.

3. Bread

Bread might seem pretty harmless, but it can actually cause some real dental issues. The problem is that, as soon as we start chewing bread, our saliva breaks down the starches and almost immediately converts them to sugar. The sticky, sugary substance that bread becomes once we start to chew it can stick to teeth and provide fuel for cavity-causing bacteria.

4. Dried fruits

Although they often seem to be the healthy snack option, dried fruits can actually cause real damage to your teeth. This is because they are full of natural sugars and the juices that would normally work to quickly rinse this sugar from your teeth have been removed during the drying process. As a result extremely sugary dried fruits often stick to our teeth, where they quickly become food for cavity-causing bacteria.

Before you get too concerned, just remember that it all comes down to moderation. We’re not asking you to entirely give up any tooth-damaging food or beverage. Instead, we simply suggest that you limit your intake of these items and that you always follow them up with a thorough cleaning of your teeth. In addition, by following your meals and sweet beverages with water, you can rinse away food particles that could fuel cavity-causing bacteria.

Reasons You May Have A Dry Mouth

Jan 29th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 29th, 2018

We all know drinking enough water is good for our health. And when you’re feeling parched, there’s nothing better than a tall drink of ice-cold water to dampen that dry mouth of yours.

But what do you do when you find yourself constantly needing to wet your whistle?

There are numerous reasons you could be suffering from dry mouth. Below are the top five.

Sometimes having a dry mouth is just a normal part of life. Temporary anxiety, open-mouthed
breathing, mild dehydration, menopause, pregnancy, and decreased saliva due to sleep are all
normal causes of dry mouth.

Prescription medication
Sixty-three percent of the top 200 most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S. are known to cause dry mouth. And the higher the number of medications a person takes, the higher the chance of dry mouth. That’s why as we age, we tend to experience more instances of dry mouth. It’s not necessarily age-related, but our consumption of medication may cause this side effect.

Habitual use of alcohol and tobacco
Use of any of these products will dry out the oral cavity.
Please drink in moderation, and make sure to up your water intake when you imbibe. As for tobacco, we always recommend quitting as soon as possible.

Chronic Disease
Diabetes, Sjogren’s disease, Sarcoidosis, Hepatitic C can all cause dry mouth.

Psychogenic or Idiopathic
When symptoms are present without an identifiable cause (idiopathic), or because of psychological causes (psychogenic), they can be difficult to diagnose.

If you find yourself with a persistent, unidentifiable case of dry mouth, you should make an appointment. Call us at 614-414-0111 or request an appointment online.

Figuring out which one is causing your dry mouth is so important because a dry mouth has a big effect on your dental health. Saliva is so important for swishing away bacteria.

The dryer the mouth, the more prone you are to cavities, bad breath, and gingivitis. We recommend visiting us at 4030 Easton Station, Suite 250, Columbus, OH 43219 or your doctor for a consultation on why you may be experiencing a dry mouth.

How Often Should You See the Dentist

Jan 29th, 2018
Easton Dentists Jan 29th, 2018

We love our patients, so we’d be more than happy to see you every day! Alas, we realize that’s not really possible to visit Easton in Columbus, OH everyday, so here are some more realistic guidelines for making appointments.

In general, it all depends on your oral health status and your health history.

For most patients, the optimal frequency to visit the dentist is twice a year. In six months,
enough tartar and plaque can build up to require a dental check-up and cleaning, especially if your dental hygiene isn’t as rigorous as it should be.

For others with gum disease, a genetic predisposition for plaque build-up or cavities, or a
weakened immune system, you’ll need to visit more frequently for optimal care.

Depending on where you fall in those categories, we will prescribe the necessary frequency to keep your optimal health.

It’s important to keep your routine visits with us so that:
• We can check for problems that you might not see or feel.
• We can find early signs of decay (decay doesn’t become visible or cause pain until it reaches more advanced stages).
• We can treat any other oral health problems found (generally, the earlier a problem is found, the more manageable it is).

There you have it! Those are the brass tacks for how often you should schedule an appointment.

Remember, we offer a variety of different hours to make it the most convenient for you!  Mondays and Wednesdays we are here for late appointments, Tuesday and Fridays we start really early, and of course we have lunchtime appointments everyday! If you need to schedule, you can do that request an appointment now!

But if it is not time for your next appointment, don’t let it keep you from stopping in and saying hi whenever you’re in the neighborhood! We are really close to Gahanna, New Albany, Westerville, and all those Easton neighborhoods!  We love seeing your smile!

What Types of Sedation do Dentists Use?

Dec 3rd, 2017
Easton Dentists Jan 3rd, 2018

Sometimes, a patient may need to be sedated before undergoing a dental procedure. There are many different types of sedation that may be used. Below, you’ll find a list of some of the most common forms of sedation that are used in dental offices.

1. Nitrous Oxide

Nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, is delivered through a mask that is placed over the nose. For patients who are agitated or nervous, nitrous oxide may be administered to help them to feel more calm and relaxed. The effects of nitrous oxide are mild and it is safe and quickly eliminated from the body.

2. Oral Sedation

Oral sedation is a bit stronger than nitrous oxide. It should not render you unconscious, but it will make you feel quite tired. If you are going to receive oral sedation at a dental appointment, you should make sure you have a ride home as it may be unsafe for you to drive yourself for a few hours after you have received your oral sedation.

3. General anesthesia

Occasionally, it may be necessary for you to be completely unconscious during a dental procedure. If this is the case, you will be administered general anesthesia. Before receiving general anesthesia, you will need to pass a physical examination.

If you have any questions about what form of anesthesia you may receive prior to your dental procedure, give us a call. We’ll be happy to explain the full effects of each type of anesthesia to you. We can also discuss your anesthesia options when we meet for a consultation. Anesthesia is often an excellent means of decreasing the anxiety and pain that many patients tend to associate with visits to the dentist’s office.

What Does it Take To Become a Dentist?

Dec 3rd, 2017
Easton Dentists Jan 3rd, 2018

Are you looking for a career where you can really make a difference? If so, a career as a dentist may be right for you! Dentists have the privilege of helping individuals to maintain their health and of relieving pain that may be caused by their dental issues. Before you can begin a career as a dentist, however, you will need to obtain the proper education and training. Below, you’ll find the four keys steps you must take to launch your career as a dentist.

1. Earn a bachelor’s degree

There is no particular pre-dental bachelor’s degree you must earn before enrolling in dental school. You must, however, take certain courses during your undergraduate career if you hope to be admitted to dental school. These courses are: Biology, Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Physics and, for most dental schools, English. To ensure that you are a competitive candidate for dental school you should try your very best to maintain a high GPA throughout your undergraduate career.

2. Take the Dental Admission Test (DAT)

All Dental School applicants must take the DAT. This test consists of four multiple choice sections that cover natural sciences, reading comprehension, quantitative reasoning, and perceptual ability. Your score on this test will play an important role in your dental school application.

3. Earn a Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) or Doctor of Medicine (DDM) degree

You must earn your degree from an accredited dental school. Typically, earning one of these degrees takes four years.

4. Pass your licensing exams

All dentists must pass the National Board Dental Examination (NBDE) which focuses on the basic sciences. Some states also require additional examinations.

If you’re interested in learning more about a career as a dentist, you can find some helpful information here: Good luck as you pursue this rewarding career path!

A Dental Approach To Stem Cells

Nov 5th, 2017
Easton Dentists Dec 5th, 2017

Researchers at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas have developed a new method for extracting the pulp from the roots of teeth. This new method allows for the harvest of four times as many stem cells as compared to other pulp extraction methods.

Stem cells may be the key to developing new, more effective therapies and treatments for many chronic and terminal diseases. Stem cells can be extracted from nearly any living tissue, but gathering enough to work with and keeping them alive until they are needed often poses a serious challenge for researchers. One promising source of stem cells is the pulp of extracted teeth. When healthy teeth are extracted, such as during wisdom tooth surgery or orthodontic treatment, they contain viable pulp from which stem cells can be extracted.

The pulp of a tooth is home to two important types of stem cells. The first, called pluripotent stem cells, can become any cell within the organism from which they are extracted. The second kind, called multipotent stem cells, can become a specific type of cell within the organism from which they are extracted. These stem cells can, theoretically, be stored and used later in the life of the person to whom the tooth belongs if this person develops an illness that stem cells can cure. Currently, however, we are unsure how long-term storage might affect these cells.

As the researchers began their attempts to extract stem cells from the pulp of teeth, they found that their methods for reaching the pulp resulted in the destruction of many viable stem cells. So, they invented a device called the “Tooth Cracker 5000.” This device allows for the clean split of a tooth and, consequently, for the preservation of most of the pulp’s stem cells.

The researcher’s new-found ability to harvest comparatively large quantities of stem cells from the pulp of teeth offers a hopeful step toward future medical innovations and the development of life-saving cures.

The First Dentist

Nov 5th, 2017
Easton Dentists Dec 5th, 2017

Dentistry has been practiced for at least 9,000 years and tooth extraction and remedies for toothaches have likely been around in some form for much longer. The first dentist whose name we know is Hesi-Re. He lived during the Third dynasty of Egypt sometime around 1600 B.C. In recovered documents, he is referred to as “Chief of Dentists and Physicians” and “Doctor of the Tooth.” He is recognized as the first person to discover periodontal disease.

Even before Hesi-Re, however, the practice of dentistry was well under way. The earliest evidence of dentistry has been found in present-day Pakistan. The evidence shows that members of the Indus River Valley Civilization cured dental issues with the use of bow drills. Essentially, the bow drill was the ancient, hand-powered antecedent of today’s dental drills. These drills predate the invention of anesthesia, which means treatment with them would have been very painful.

By about 4,500 B.C., fillings were being used. The oldest evidence of the use of dental fillings was found in present-day Slovenia and was found to be about 6,500 years old. It is possible that fillings of one sort or another were used before this time, but evidence has yet to be discovered. The filling that was found was made of beeswax and was packed into a tooth with a deep cavity. This beeswax filling was likely effective in reducing the pain and swelling that the cavity caused.

In the dark ages, advances in dentistry, as in many other fields, were lost. Dentistry was, for a time, no longer considered a unique practice and dental work was performed in large part by barbers and, sometimes, medical doctors. Barbers primarily focused on extracting teeth.

In 1723, modern dentistry was born with the publication of Pierre Fauchard’s The Surgeon Dentist: A Treatise on Teeth. This treatise offered a comprehensive approach to the care and treatment of teeth.

The dentists of today owe their knowledge to the innovators of 9,000 years ago and of yesterday, who did not settle with the status quo of dental care and who made today’s treatments possible. If you’re in need of today’s finest dental treatment, visit The Dental Center at Easton Town Center today.